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Full text of "Carpenter"

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Accidents involving ladders kill or maim 3,000 workers every 
year. Make sure you are not one of them. Observe the following 
simple rules to avoid a ladder accident: 



Never allow the horizontal distance from the wall to exceed one- 
quarter of the length of the ladder. 

Always place ladder on a secure footing. 

Replace, do not repair, broken cleats or side rails. 

Ladder should extend at least three feet above top landing to pro- 
vide a safe handhold. 

Portable ladders more than 30 feet in length should never be used. 
Use non-slip cleats on all hard or slippery surfaces. 



TREAT A 

LADDER 

LIKE AN 

ADDER'' 





THE COVER 

The cover photograph shows a view of the Hutcheson 
Memorial Forest at Rutgers University. Photo inset on 
cover is entrance to forest. A detailed feature with 
additional color and black and white photographs 
appears in a special center section in this issue 
pages 23-26. 



^UlfXIPfGA 



ERITAGE FOR TOMORROW 



'"PHIS is a sample issue showing 
what the new journal will 
look like, beginning in January, 
when printing is transferred to 
Merkle Press, Inc., Washington, 
D. C. Because the journal will be 
run off the presses in two or three 
days, it will be possible to run a 
great deal more spot news con- 
cerning activities of Local Unions 
and Councils. There will be more 
room for technical information 
and new developments in materi- 
als and techniques. More features 
can be planned and a more diver- 
sified range of departments can 
be provided for every issue. 

, THE CARPENTER has been 
operating on a per capita tax allo- 
cation of five cents since the year 
1914. Printing costs have more 
than quadrupled in the past 46 
years, but the journal still is 
operating on the same per capita 
tax basis that existed at the start 
of World War I. 

It is the hope of the General 
Office that the journal can be 
made into a magazine that sets 
the pace for the entire labor press 
field. With the support and co- 
operation of the membership, it 
can and will be. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

4 The Age Demands Loyalty, Dedication, .by M. A. Hutcheson 
Chicago Welcomes Carpenters Mayor Richard J. Daley 

10 Chicago — Yesterday and Today 

The Challenge Facing Apprenticeship. . .by John R. Stevenson 

20 Memorable Milestones 

23 Hutcheson Memorial Forest 

28 The Future Belongs to the Prepared. . . .by William O. Blaier 

32 Brotherhood Belongs in Our Name .... by Richard E. Livingston 

38 Strong Hands at the Helm 

40 80 Years of the Carpenter 

43 Joblessness No. 1 Problem in Canada 



DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 
17 Editorials 

Progress Report 

Official Information 

Ammunition for the Budget Battle 

47 Local Union News 

48 Short Cuts 



17 awt" --"' .'-"■" 17 




WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



BOTH PARTIES 
GET BLAMED 



One of the biggest noises in the current political 
campaign — and noise that promises to become louder as the 
oratorical decibels pick up — concerns the praise and/or 
blame for accomplishment and/or lack of same at the recent 
short session of Congress. 

Republicans are blaming the Democrats for not enacting 
more of the Eisenhower program. The "approval score" of 
the Presidential proposals fell to an all-time low since 
General Eisenhower has been in the White House. The score 
on Ike's record fell to 30.6 or little more than 30 per 
cent of his recommendations for the short session. His best 
year was his first, 1953, when Congress approved 72.7 per 
cent of his recommendations. 

Democrats, on the other hand, blame the coalition of 
Republicans and conservative Democrats (Dixiecrats) for 
blocking many of the progressive measures which the majority 
party in Congress hoped to see enacted. The House Rules 
Committee, say the Democrats, must share blame as a legisla- 
tive roadblock in the post convention session. 



NO SITUS BILL 
THIS YEAR 



Construction unions were disheartened that progress on 
the situs picketing bill came to a dead halt after leaders 
of both parties had promised their best efforts toward 
enactment in the 1960 session. This issue of situs 
picketing is not a partisan matter since reform steps have 
been recommended by the President and by both parties. 
Somehow, the conservative members of Congress have been able 
to waylay matters so that we will have to wait until the 
new Congress and new session convenes next January. 

Situs picketing is a big item on the construction man's 
agenda, but there were other pieces of legislative 
shortchanging which made all labor unhappy. The minimum 
wage bill got bogged down and was a casualty to legislative 
and political differences between both Houses of Congress. 
Federal aid to education which could have meant a great deal 
to construction got lost since the bills from each house 
were different and efforts to adjust failed. Housing is 
another area in which construction people had a big stake ; 
final results were a greatly modified bill. Most of 
labor was likewise disappointed in the medical care for 

the aged measure finally passed it was called a 

"pauper's" bill since claimants have to show economic need. 



REGISTRATION 
DRIVES PUSHED 



The bobtail 
Washington obse 
both ways, but 
looking to 1960 

First of al 
out a full labo 
trying to get i 
1960 as they di 
issue in '58. 
all-out vote fo 
friends — —lots 
and in Congress 



ed session had bobtailed results, 

rvers agree, and the blame will be assessed 

while this is going on labor is 

1, strong efforts are being made to get 
r family registration. Secondly, labor is 
ts people to work as energetically in 
d in the states where right-to-work was an 
Thirdly, labor is trying to mobilize an 
r its friends. And labor will need 

of friends in the state legislatures 

next year. 



THE CARPENTER 



LANDRUM-GRIFFIN 
LAW RAPPED 



Registration drives are being pushed by both major 
parties and by industry and such organizations as the 
League of Women Voters, women's clubs, etc. Women will be 
a big factor in 1960 since there may well be more female 
voters at the polls than male. 

Labor is looking toward the new Congress and will have 
a real bill of particulars to present. This will mean 
situs picketing, minimum wage, housing and related matters. 
Labor may seek reform of the Landrum-Grif fin law 
particularly since the American Bar Association report this 
month gave the measure such a verbal shellacking. The 
ABA Labor Relations Section called the first year under 
Landrum-Grif fin one of "confusion and irritation." The 
Section called the reporting requirements a 
"most burdensome task" and indicated the section "could 
be unconstitutional." The bonding requirements were seen 
to "contain a bramble of ambiguities which threaten to 
make it unworkable if not unbearable." High surety rates 
have been fixed and "the costs to unions have been 
extremely heavy, in some cases six times that prior to 
the statute." The ABA Section blasted the investigating 
practices of the Government under L-G. 

With the authority of the professionals who have to 
deal with Landrum-Grif fin behind them, labor people may 
push for a clarification and easing of some 
of L-G burdens. 



NEW RULES ON 
RADIATION 



A little known change has been made by the Atomic 
Energy Commission in reducing by two-thirds the so-called 
"safe limits of radiation." The new limits, effective 
January 1, will hold radiation exposure to 5 roentgens 
a year whereas the old rules allowed as much as 15. 
Organized labor has been campaigning for more radiation 
safety and the new rules are part of the answer. 
Labor's role in getting closer attention to radiation 
limits was probably decisive although the 
general press did not so indicate. 



LABOR IMPROVES 
NLRB RECORD 



Labor seems to be doing a little better in the NLRB 
collective bargaining elections, according to the report 
for the 1960 second quarter. This report shows that these 
elections reached an eight-year high and unions scored a 
60 per cent mark in victories, which was slightly over the 
58.6 figure covering the fiscal year ending June 30. The 
report also shows that union representation was chosen by 
62 per cent of those voting. This figure is somewhat higher 
than has prevailed recently. Incidentally, figures for in- 
junctions show a 112 per cent increase during the April- 
June period. Also during the period the NLRB general 
counsel issued 249 formal complaints alleging unfair labor 
practices by employers, another 93 against unions and an even 
two dozen against both employers and managements. 



MISHAPS 
PREVENTABLE 



The U.S. Public Health Service comes up with some useful 
advice in "The Anatomy of an Accident" in its publication, 
"Public Health Reports." Dr. Albert L. Chapman, Assistant 
Surgeon General, stresses the fact that accidents don't 
"just happen". They "are caused by what people do or by 
what they fail to do. Acceptance of this truth means that 
one must admit that since human action can be modified, 
accidents — with rare exceptions — are preventable 
occurrences. " This sounds like useful doctrine for both 
labor and management in the construction industry. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



ft 





By Maurice A. Hutcheson 

General President 

POLITICAL and financial writers 
have named the era we live in 
the "Space Age." To some extent 
the name is appropriate. We indeed 
are living in a period when the con- 
quest of space is a foregone conclu- 
sion, awaiting only the big break- 
through in scientific development. 

Most of us will live long enough 
to see the day when interplanetary 
travel is as thoroughly mastered as 
intercity travel is today. As the teen- 
agers put it, "Space is our oyster." 

However, I believe our slice of 
human history is dominated by an- 
other factor that, in the long run, may 
be as soberly important as the con- 
quering of space. This factor is the 
inability of man to live peacefully with 
his fellow man, on a basis of equality, 
brotherhood, and human concern. 

This is the factor that may yet earn 
for our era the title, "Age of Uncer- 
tainty." Uncertainty has become the 
hallmark of twentieth century living. 

The major uncertainty is that a 
world engaged in a perpetual cold war 
can stave off a shooting war indefi- 
nitely. 

A concurrent uncertainty is that 



ands ldyalty, dedication 



man can master the machines and 
gadgets he is perpetually inventing, 
rather than allowing himself to be- 
come their victim. 

This is the climate facing our 1960 
convention. 

The threat of a nuclear war is never 
far from our thoughts, because total 
extinction can be the only end result. 

Similarly, the waking hours of most 
of us are haunted by the prospect 
of a new machine capable of making 
our skills and experience obsolete 
overnight — a fate that already has 
befallen many. 

All this places new emphasis on 
clear thinking and adds to the respon- 
sibilities each citizen must carry, par- 
ticularly when in a position of leader- 
ship. 

No person is entirely free of these 
two major fears. The atom bomb can 
reach the palaces as well as the tene- 
ments. And technology can eliminate 
the superintendent as surely as it can 
the sweeper. 

All this is merely by way of observa- 
tion. The uncertainties that hang over 
the orderly world we knew cloud the 
background constantly. But life must 
go on. And the day-to-day challenges 
of discharging our responsibilities, 
meeting our obligations, and solving 




THE CARPENTER 



■ : m.li 



ur problems diminish not a whit 

ecause human extinction has become 

distinct possibility. 

As a labor organization — one of 
le oldest and most respected in the 
orld, I may add — our task is to de- 
ise and adhere to policies that will 
ermit us not only to survive but to 
row and prosper as well. The 1960 
onvention must play the architect in 
hie shaping of these policies. 

It is hardly necessary for me to 
oint out that these are troubled times 
or organized labor. Every member 
fho has the slightest interest in the 
ffairs of his union knows that there 
re well-organized and well-financed 
roups in existence that have as their 
rimary aim the crippling of the labor 
lovement. The names they go under 
re numerous and varied. The meas- 
res they advocate range from right- 
o-work to Landrum-Griffin. But es- 
entially they all seek the same end — 
he elimination of organized labor as 
n effective force in American eco- 
omic and political life. 

'ffor/s Pay Off 

That their efforts are paying off 
attested to by the fact that the 
;rowth of organized labor has failed 
o keep pace with the growth in our 
vorking force. In the past 10 years 
>ur total labor force has increased by 
ome 10 or 11 million workers. Dur- 
ng this same period the labor move- 
nent has grown very little. In fact, 
here is good reason to suspect that 
t even decreased in the past 10 years. 

The restrictive laws which have been 
>assed since 1947 contributed sub- 
tantially to this decline in labor's 
lercentage of the total work force 
>rganized. But another factor played 
i very important part. In the last 8 
'ears, production of durable goods 
las increased by nearly 30 per cent. 
>ut the number of workers required 
o turn out these goods decreased by 
> 11,000. In the same period, the 
production of non-durable goods grew 
jy better than a third. But the num- 
ber of workers producing them fell by 
188,000. 

Most of these displaced workers 
vere union members, since the pro- 
duction industries are the best organ- 
zed. Up until 3 years ago, the num- 
ber of production workers always 
exceeded the number of service work- 
ers in the United States. But not any 
■nore. 

As far back as 1910, a trend of 
: ewer production workers and more 
service workers began to make itself 
elt. The pace accelerated over the 
^ears. And about 1957, the service 




General President M. A. Hutcheson 



employment actually passed the pro- 
duction employment for the first time 
in history. 

As of now, there are some 32Vi 
million people employed in the service 
industries — ll'i million in trade, 8 
million in government, 4 million in 
transportation and public utilities, IVi 
million in finance, insurance, and real 
estate, and dVi million in all others. 

By contrast, there are only 26 mil- 
lion employed in the production of 
goods — 16 million in manufacturing, 
6 million in agriculture, 3 million in 
construction, and about 1 million in 
mining. 

Since organization has been most 
complete in production industries, and 
lightest in service industries, the trend 
has reflected itself in total union mem- 
bership records. 

A recent study by the Department 
of Labor entitled. "Manpower: Chal- 
lenge of the 'Sixties", foresees a con- 
tinuation of this trend away from 
production employment and toward 
service industry employment. 



The Department of Labor study 
visualizes a growth of 20 million 
workers in the labor force during the 
decade of the 1960's. By some mys- 
terious alchemy it also foresees a total 
increase of about 20 million in jobs 
between now and 1970. This, of 
course, makes a neat package, with 
the number of people entering the 
labor market and the number of new 
jobs cancelling each other out. 

However, there is one questionable 
factor in the Labor Department's pro- 
jections. These projections are based 
on the last decade's technology. But 
technology is moving ahead faster 
than anything else. As technology in- 
creases, fewer and fewer workers are 
needed to produce the goods we re- 
quire. Even the service industries are 
not immune from this constant trend 
toward automation. 

If technology did not increase any 
in the next 10 years, the projections 
of the Department of Labor might 
have real validity. But the constant 
improvement and expansion of auto- 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



"CARPENTEniONEERS" 




ELEVEN DELEGATES OF THE 36 ATTENDING 
THE FIRST CONVENTION IN 1881 







Above is an old building at Nineteenth and Wright streets in 
St. Louis, Mo. where a group of St. Louis carpenters met to 
arrange to call a national conference of carpenters to organize 
an international union. At left is the entrance to 2912 Nine- 
teenth street through which carpenters entered to reach the 
meeting hall on the second floor where they arranged to send 
notices for the Chicago conference to be held August 8, 1881. 



matic machinery and equipment con- 
stantly tend to shrink the number of 
obs available. Hence there is cause 
for skepticism regarding the optimistic 
findings of the manpower study. 

The Department of Labor visualizes 
instruction employment growing at 
i much faster pace than industry gen- 
erally. As far as it goes, this predic- 
ion probably is based on solid facts. 
But the truth of the matter is that the 
lollar volume of construction needed 
o provide a day's work for a con- 
truction worker is constantly going 
ip. The growing population insures 
hat there will be an expanding de- 
nand for schools, churches, office 
buildings, factories, etc. But the total 
effect on construction employment will 
tot keep pace simply because fewer 
workers turn out more dollars' worth 
)f work each year. To assume that 
because 40 billion-dollar volume today 
provides three million jobs, that 80 
jillion in 1970 will provide six million 
obs is to ignore the pace at which 
echnology is advancing. 

Furthermore, the Department study 
ails to give consideration to the fact 
hat construction, more than any other 
ndustry, is sensitive to interest rates 
ind the availability of money. Interest 
ates have skyrocketed at an alarming 
ate over the past 10 years. This 
rend is not likely to reverse itself very 
oon. Every time interest rates in- 
:rease by a small percentage, the effect 
s immediately felt by the construc- 
ion industry. 

Tight money (and the high interest 
ites it induces) already have applied 
i substantial brake on home construc- 
ion as well as industrial and com- 
nercial building. In too many in- 



stances, construction is an item that 
can be postponed for a reasonable 
length of time. The family that needs 
a new home, the church that needs a 
bigger structure, the factory that would 
like to have a larger plant — all can 
postpone their building plans for a 
considerable length of time if they 
entertain the hope interest rates may 
go down. 

.This means that every increase in 
interest rates will shrink the construc- 
tion market by a sizeable percentage. 

Consequently, there may be some 
wishful thinking included in the Labor 
Department's analysis of building pros- 
pects for the next 10 years unless the 
tight money policy is eased. 

On the other hand, there is a de- 
velopment in construction which lends 
considerable optimism to the picture 
for the 1960's. 

The very trend toward automation 
which is shrinking factory jobs rapidly 
is contributing to the demand for new 
buildings. Automated factories re- 
quire buildings especially designed and 
erected to fit the production process 
involved. Technology is changing so 
rapidly that durability is no longer an 
important factor in factory structures. 
In 20 years or less, the average factory 
(and the structure that houses it) both 
will become obsolete. New machinery 
will require a new building. This 
process will repeat itself every 15 or 
20 years. The factory built to last 
100 years is a thing of the past. 

In office buildings the same trend 
away from permanency prevails. Land 
is growing so valuable, bigger and 
higher buildings must be erected each 
generation to make the land pay. This 
means that construction will have 



heavy demands made on it for a long 
time to come. 

I sincerely hope that the matter of 
a shorter work week will be given 
greater attention by all workers in the 
days ahead. 

Ever since the end of World War II, 
there has been a good deal of talk 
about a 32- or a 30-hour week. But 
to date, specific action along this line 
has been quite spotty. The truth of 
the matter is that most of the talk 
about a shorter work week comes 
from union officials. There seems to 
be very little agitation on the part of 
the rank and file for such a move. 

In this day and age of inflated prices 
and increasing pressures for more and 
more luxury goods, it is understand- 
able that men are driven to seek maxi- 
mum earnings. 

But principles cannot be ignored 
forever. The 8-hour day has been 
in existence since the United Brother- 
hood spearheaded a drive for the en- 
tire labor movement to establish it 
away back in 1896. The 5-day week 
is at least 35 years old. I believe it is 
high time for organized labor to con- 
sider taking a part of its rewards for 
increased productivity in the form of 
greater leisure time. 

It is obvious that the first step in 
insuring ample employment opportuni- 
ties during the 1960's rests on our 
ability to organize a far greater per- 
centage of our craft. Certainly, it 
will not be possible to decrease the 
work week until such time as a much 
more substantial percentage of our 
trade is unionized. 

Similiarly, it will be increasingly 
difficult to maintain full employment 
in our industry if a great many work- 



5EPTEMBER, 1960 




Since World War II America has been engaged in a national defense program which 
has included a wide range of installations. This one above in an isolated area of the 
West is typical of those under way in the last 15 years. Carpenters are making 
important construction contributions in missile base construction work. 



ers are subject to the whims of non- 
union employers. 

Therefore, it seems that our chal- 
lenge for the next 10 years is to greatly 
increase our effectiveness in the field 
of organizing on the construction site 
and in the industrial plant. 

I want you to know that we have 
the largest and best organizing staff 
in our history working in the field. 
However, organizing is a matter that 
takes initiative and cooperation at the 
local level. The best organizer in the 
world cannot make progress very fast 
if the local unions and district council 
in the area in which he is operating 
do not lend him wholehearted assist- 
ance and undergird his efforts with 
some effort of their own. 

Whether the problem is maintaining 
high employment, cutting hours, fight- 
ing anti-labor legislation, or making 
gains in the area of social legislation, 
organizing is the key. 

With the overwhelming majority of 
our trade organized, there is no limit 
to the progress we could make. But 
we operate under a handicap when 
only a part of the people in our trade 
are organized. 

Organizing has been made doubly 
difficult by the anti-labor laws passed 
during the past 12 years. One of our 
most important goals must be to get 
these laws amended or repealed. 

But in this field, too, we are slowed 
down because too large a percentage 
of workers in our trade is outside the 
union fold. Our political effectiveness 



will never be what it should be until 
such time as we have the vast bulk 
of the people who rightfully belong 
in our organization carrying Brother- 
hood books. 

From all this you should be able to 
deduce that I consider organizing the 



key to most of our problems. This is 
so. Whether you consider ample em- 
ployment, shorter work week, higher 
wages, or better labor legislation the 
No. 1 problem, organizing the unor- 
ganized is the first big step toward the 
solution. 

Therefore I hope all of us — at the 
local level, as well as the General 
Office — can give much greater em- 
phasis to organizing activities in the 
years ahead. And I want to assure 
you that the General Office will lend 
every possible effort to the cause. 

In this era of turmoil it is hardly 
necessary for me to emphasize that 
we are citizens of the United States 
or Canada first and Brotherhood mem- 
bers second. We want a chance to 
solve our problems, but the problems 
of national survival deserve and will 
get priority. 

From the very beginning we have 
operated on the theory that free men 
have a responsibility to protect and 
nurture the institutions and processes 
of government that make them free, 
even though personal sacrifices may be 
entailed. We have no intention of 
changing at this late date. 

In the final analysis, loyalty and 
dedication will solve all our problems, 
both those that face us as United States 
and Canadian citizens, and those that 
face us as members of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America. 





This photograph of a space age missile typifies current problems and challenges. 
The construction program incident to missile support requires the skills of many 
trades and in this work Carpenters are called upon for exacting and diversified tasks. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




CHICAGO 




CARPENTERS 




RICHARD J. DALEY 



OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 
CITY OF CHICAGO 



Mr. M. A. Hutcheson, General President 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters & 
Joiners of America 
222 East Michigan Street 
Indianapolis I4, Indiana 



Dear Mr, Hutcheson: 



As Chief Executive of the City of Chicago, It 
gives me great pleasure to officially welcome the Special 
Convention of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America to our exciting city. 

It is a happy circumstance that brings this 
convention to Chicago. The United Brotherhood was born 
here nearly 80 years ago. The first convention represented 
barely 2,000 members . I understand the i960 convention 
will be speaking for a membership of 800,000. This Is 
sol id progress . 



prospered 



Like the United Brotherhood , Chicago also has 
In l88l the population of the entire State of 



prospered. in 1001 ine popuidi ion 01 liic enure oidie c 
Illinois was considerably sma 1 ler than the present popu- 
lation of Chicago. We consider this real progress too . 

Under such circumstances, It is no exaggeration 
to say that the United Brotherhood and the City of Chicago 
grew up together. In fact, they helped to build each other. 
The skyscrapers, factories, and homes that stretch out in 
all d irect ions were built by Brotherhood members . And the 
growing city provided Jobs for thousands of building crafts- 
men year in and year out. Chicago and the United Brother- 
hood weathered many political and economic storms together 
over the past three-quarters of a century. 

For all these reasons 1 am extremely happy to 
be able to say "We lcome Home" to the United Brotherhood for 
the brief period of this Convent ion. Chicago is a hospitable 
and warm-hearted city. I know your stay will be a pleasant 
one because we have the facilities for gratifying every 
taste and meeting every need. Knowing most of your 
General Officers as I do, 1 cannot conceive of your 
Convention being anything but a productive and reward ing 
one . 

Thanks again for coming to Chicago. 








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CHICAGO 



CHICAGO, one of the most in- 
teresting and exciting cities in the 
world where the natives proudly boast 
that "there's something happening 
every minute", is host to the 1960 
Special Convention of the United 
Brotherhood. 

Something seems to have been hap- 
pening every minute in Chicago since 
it first became one of a chain of fur 
trading posts back in 1673 when 
French explorers and traders founded 
the port city. The names of these 
early explorers are still familiar to 
Chicagoans in names of streets, build- 
ings, sections, etc. — LaSalle, Joliet, 
Marquette. 

Traffic tangle of 1908 at right. This snarl of 
horsedrawn vehicles appears to have tied up 
things at the corner of Randolph and Dearborn. 



^uhiih\ od Tohi 




This is an 1898 view of the City Hall and County Building 
and at right is a ferris wheel at the World's Fair of 1893. 



10 




Above is a view of the spectacular Chicago skyline. At right is a photograph of 
the Hotel Morrison which will be the headquarters hotel for the 1960 convention. 



The portage possibilities of transit 
from the Great Lakes to the Missis- 
sippi System was early recognized by 
the French and has been a source of 
transportation and economic impor- 
tance since the days of the fur traders. 
Transportation has been of primary 
importance to Chicago and it became 
one of the early centers of railroading. 
The location of the city made it ideal 
for redistribution of goods — from the 
lakes southward, from the Northwest 
to the East, from the East to all points 
in the West. It is today the rail capital 
of the nation, a distinction it has en- 
joyed for decades. 

Just ten years before the founding 
of the Carpenters in Chicago the great 
lake city suffered its gravest disaster, 
the Great Chicago Fire of October 8, 
1871. The fire broke out in the lumber 
area on the West Side and before the 
fire was subdued 27 hours later two- 
thirds of the city was destroyed and 
100,000 were homeless. The U.S. and 
foreign countries rallied to aid in a 
relief campaign of magnificent pro- 
portions with gifts of money, food, 
clothing, medicine supplies. 

Chicago, lusty and dynamic then as 



now, rebuilt its business section in a 
year and in three years most of the 
scars of the holocaust had been 
obliterated. 

Chicago became a great industrial 
center and construction was an im- 
portant industry in the growth of new 
industries, housing and public service 
buildings — schools, churches, clubs, 
meeting halls, etc. As the industry 
grew labor unionism developed and 
Chicago lays proud claim today to 
being one of the greatest training 
grounds in America for union leaders, 
particularly in the building and con- 
struction trades. 

Chicago has drawn visitors as if it 
were a great magnet and many have 
come to stay. The city is one of the 
greatest centers of immigrant strains 
in America with names which remind 
the visitor of practicallv every country 
of the Old World. 

The city is a strong one for exposi- 
tions and has for decades been a great 
convention city. It leans heavily to 
national and international expositions 
going back to the great Columbian 
Exposition of 1892 and coming on 
down to the Century of Progress. 



Twin towers will be erected in Chicago by the Building Service 
Employes Union. This is one of the more spectacular projects 
to be planned and started in the Chicago area in many years. 





Since 1881. when the Carpenters 
Union was founded when Chicago was 
a city of 503. 1S5 until today as the 
organization meets in Special Conven- 
tion, Chicago has shown remarkable 
growth. It now has 3,511,648 and is 
America's second city in size. 

The city is strongly represented in 
many industries such as meat packing 
— Carl Sandburg called it "hog butcher 
for the world" — food products, iron 
and steel, machinery, electrical ap- 
(Continued on page 46) 



Points of Interest 

• "The Loop", downtown business sec- 
tion of stores, shops, offices. 
Chicago Stockyards, world's largest. 
Merchandise Mart 
Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Art Institute 
Buckingham Fountain 
Gold Coast 

Lincoln Park, Zoo, Conservatory 
Elks' National Memorial 
Adler Planetarium 
Shedd Aquarium 
Soldier Field 
Chinatown 
Oriental Institute 
Museum of Science and Industry 

11 



the challenge facing apprenticeship 




By John R. Stevenson 

First General Vice President 

FROM the beginning of the indus- 
trial age in the United States and 
Canada, the importance of good equip- 
ment, properly housed, has been 
known to management. When man- 
agers needed a piece of new equipment 
they bought it. When they needed a 
larger building they made arrange- 
ments to erect it. One way or another, 






they took care of the costs because 
they realized that over the long haul 
the advantages would out-weigh the 
expense. 

However, only in relatively recent 
years has there been recognition of 
the fact that skilled manpower is an 
important ingredient in industrial prog- 
ress, and that properly trained man- 
power can come only through invest- 
ment in effective training programs. 
Only recently have employers recog- 
nized that training young men for 
skilled trades is an investment as surely 
as the purchase of new equipment is. 

Although apprenticeship training 
literally is as old as the pyramids, the 
formalized program we follow today 
dates back only a few generations. In 
that short time it has come a long way, 
but it also has a long way to go. I 
say this as a member of the National 
Committee on Carpentry Apprentice- 
ship, a position that puts me in an 
advantageous spot to assess the 
strengths and weaknesses of the whole 
apprenticeship training effort. From 
this vantage point I would like to 
briefly discuss the status of apprentice- 
ship training as I see it. 

If forecasts of the Department of 
Labor are correct, a million new con- 
struction workers will need to be re- 
cruited and trained between now and 
1 970. This is an increase of one- 
third in the present supply of building 
tradesmen. The Department considers 
there are 3 million workers engaged 
in the construction industry today. 
This figure must climb to 4 million 
by 1970, the Department believes. I 
sincerely hope the forecasts of the 
Labor Department's statisticians are 
true. 




The Department of Labor predic- 
tions quoted above are set forth in a 
recent pamphlet entitled "Manpower 
— Challenge of the Sixties." The ulti- 
mate conclusion which the Department 
of Labor statisticians reach in this 
pamphlet is that the United States 
will be hard pressed to fill the demands 
for skilled labor in 1970. 

To be a little more specific, here is 
the way the pamphlet visualizes 
changes coming in the next 10 years. 
Best estimates are that the population 
of the United States will increase from 
the present 180 million people to 208 
million by 1970. This represents an 
increase of 28 million, or 15 per cent. 
Young workers will account for a 
major share of the increase in the 
working population. Even though 
there is a trend for young people to 
stay in school longer, workers under 
25 years of age will account for a 
large part of the labor force during 
the 1970's. 

On the other hand, the number of 
workers between 35 and 44 will actu- 
ally decrease. This is the generation 
that was born during the Great De- 
pression of the 1930's. Accidents, 
death and retirement will gradually 
thin the ranks. 

While the population itself is grow- 
ing 15 per cent, the demand for 
skilled workers will increase by ap- 
proximately 40 per cent. So the per- 
centage of skilled workers will go up 
steadily even as the population itself 
grows. 

This naturally means that the train- 
ing efforts of all groups employing 
skilled mechanics will have to be 
stepped up considerably. The way the 
Department of Labor sees things, total 



12 



THE CARPENTER 




First General Vice President John R. Stevenson 



employment will rise about 20 per 
cent in the next 10 years. However, 
construction employment will increase 
much faster than employment in gen- 
eral. On the other hand, semi-skilled 
employment will increase less than 
employment in general during the 
period. 

I think there are some serious im- 
plications for our organization in these 
figures. If a larger percentage of the 
work force is to be made up of 
younger workers, it follows that our 
organization will be required to help 
train them. 

Our Brotherhood has maintained a 
continuing interest in apprenticeship 
training from the day it was born. In 
fact, the lack of any formalized plan 
for passing on skills was one of the 
unhealthy conditions prevailing in 
1881 that prompted the carpenters of 
that era to form a national union. In 
the original convention call that was 
issued in May of 1881, the following 
sentence was included: 



"And for want of a strict apprentice 
system and through lack of union 
among mechanics, the trade literally 
swarms with unskilled men." 

By 1886, after the Brotherhood be- 
came the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
efforts to inaugurate an effective ap- 
prenticeship program were already 
under way. The constitution of that 
day set forth that 'Any apprentice 
... of good moral character, may be 
admitted and have voice and vote in 
the union." 

This demonstrates. I think, that our 
organization has always had a keen 
and continuing interest in good ap- 
prenticeship training. Over the years, 
we have spent a great deal of time, 
effort and money promoting sound 
apprenticeship training. 

The 1946 Convention, in line with 
a recommendation contained in Gen- 
eral President William L. Hutcheson's 
report, authorized the establishment of 
a standing committee on apprentices 



and the compilation of a standard 
apprenticeship training manual. The 
committee did its job well and the 
standard Brotherhood manual is widely 
used throughout the United States and 
Canada. 

This manual is made up of units 
numbered from one to 12. Also in- 
cluded are blueprints — 15 to a set. 
The latest units off the press deal with 
the all-important matters of safety 
and mathematics for carpenters. These 
units are as useful for journeymen 
as they are for apprentices. I highly 
recommend them to all members who 
want to work without getting hurt or 
to brush up on their mathematics. 

In 1937 the Federal government set 
up the Bureau of Apprenticeship 
Training within the Department of 
Labor. The services of the Bureau 
have been a tremendous help in setting 
up joint committees and in coordi- 
nating the efforts of employers and 
unions in apprenticeship matters. As 
the result of all this cooperation and 
effort, a fine system of apprenticeship 
training has been created. We now 
have the machinery for doing the 
necessary job; all that is needed is a 
greater awareness of the size of the 
task facing us. 

Apprenticeship Sags 

Despite the challenge clearly out- 
lined in the Department of Labor's 
new pamphlet, apprenticeship enroll- 
ments registered with the government 
have been sagging. Engineering News 
Record last year reported that the 
total number of registered apprentices 
in building construction had fallen off 
steadily over the three preceding years. 
The total 1959 figure stood at 105,523 
compared to 112,619 registered ap- 
prentices three years previously. 

All this adds up to one thing — 
apprenticeship training faces a great 
challenge if the Department of Labor 
forecasts are valid. All building trades- 
men have a stake in the outcome. 
When sufficient skilled workers are 
not available, employers tend to break 
down trades into simple components 
that can be taught quickly. This down- 
grades the whole stature of the trade 
and produces an army of half-trained 
workers who are capable of doing 
only one thing. These half-baked op- 
eratives clutter up the industry. Being 
neither fish nor fowl, they cannot 
command decent wages because their 
usefulness is limited. So they hold 
back the whole trade. 

The only way properly trained men 
can be developed is through good 
apprenticeship training. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



13 



I am happy to say that our efforts 
along this line are setting the pace 
for the building industry. Our records 
show that we have had between 30,000 
and 40,000 young men undergoing 
apprenticeship training every year 
since the end of World War II. And 
I believe the quality of the training 
we are providing is among the best 
in the industry. 

Admittedly, our apprentice pro- 
grams are not equally effective 
throughout all parts of the United 
States and Canada. Some areas do a 
first rate job, while others dawdle 
along. There are some areas where 
beefing up of our program needs to 
be achieved. 

Screening Necessary 

First, I believe we need to develop 
good screening programs for weeding 
out applicants who have neither the 
flair nor the proper mental attitude 
for becoming good craftsmen. Every 
misfit who stumbles into apprentice- 
ship training gives a black eye to our 
trade. Either he drops out somewhere 
along the line or becomes a mediocre 
craftsman. In either case, he is no 
asset to our organization or to our 
industry. So it seems to me that a 
good screening program can save us 
considerable grief along this line. 

The employer who uses an appren- 
tice as a source of cheap labor rather 
than treating him as a learner whose 
training should encompass all facets 
of the trade, does a disservice to the 
entire industry. Similarly, the union 
that does not police apprenticeship 
training sufficiently to eliminate this 
sort of thing is doing a similar dis- 
service. 

I believe, too, that we need to ex- 
pand our sponsorship of refresher 
courses for journeymen who have 
been working at the trade for years. 
Techniques and materials are chang- 
ing so rapidly that new understand- 
ing and new know-how often become 
necessary. A piece of plastic substi- 
tuted for a piece of wood must be 
laid out in the same way. But the 
techniques for cutting plastics and the 
techniques for installing them may 
require treatment unrelated to han- 
dling wood. The topnotch mechanic 
of 5 years or 1 years from now may 
have to have some understanding of 
the properties of various building ma- 
terials — their tensile strength, elas- 
ticity, compressibility, etc. 

Coupled with this is the certainty 
that the recruitment of competent 
supervisory personnel is going to be- 
come an increasingly important prob- 









^^^^^^^^ 


Jj; 




UNITED 


BROTHERHOOD APPRENTICE 










^-^^^^^ 




RANKING CHART I 






No. of 


%of 


mm 


AREA 


1 APPRENTICES! 


JOURNEYMAt 


l ! m\ jo 


ALABAMA 


! 436 


7.1 % 


MANITOBA 1 


ALASKA 


88 


4.1 % 


NEW BRUNSWICK ?| 


ARIZONA 


! 604 


9.7% 


YUKON TERRITORY j| 


ARKANSAS 


119 


4.4% 


PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND^ 


CALIFORNIA 


6744 


7.7% 


QUEBEC ] 


COLORADO 


283 


5.0% 


MAINE i 


CONNECTICUT 


! 472 


6.8% 


ONTARIO 


DELAWARE 


122 


8.9% 


CANAL ZONE i 


FLORIDA 


! 875 


5.8% 


NEWFOUNDLAND \ 


GEORGIA 
HAWAII 


328 
92 


6.3% 


NORTH CAROLINA |« 


7.8% 


NEW HAMPSHIRE !.:] 


IDAHO 


! 155 


7.1 % 


SOUTH CAROLINA !<S 


ILLINOIS 


2393 


5.0% 


ALBERTA \U 


INDIANA 


641 


4.7% 


MARYLAND \S 


IOWA 


i 402 


8.2% 


ALASKA '] 


KANSAS 


344 


7.4% 


ARKANSAS 3 


KENTUCKY 


! 297 


6.1 % 


TENNESSEE '■■$ 


LOUISIANA 


1 706 


7.9% 


INDIANA il 


MAINE 


! 45 


2.5% 


SASKATCHEWAN A 


MARYLAND 


142 


3.9% 


VIRGINIA 4 


MASSACHUSETTS 


834 


6.4% 


COLORADO jj 


MICHIGAN 


1177 


■•Yw'V 


! ILLINOIS i« 


MINNESOTA 


977 


'■ 7.3% 


OREGON |J 


MISSISSIPPI 


295 


7.8% 


WASHINGTON ,.| 


MISSOURI 


1165 


6.9% 


NEW JERSEY ; J 


MONTANA 


275 


6 4% 


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
BRITISH COLUMBIA iJ 


NEBRASKA 


187 


6.8% 


NEVADA 


146 


6.7% 


NOVA SCOTIA [2 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


78 


3.6% 


RHODE ISLAND i'J 


NEW JERSEY 


639 


5.2% 


UTAH ;3 


new "Mexico 


212 


9.5% 


WISCONSIN i'j 


NEW YORK 


4148 


9.6% 


FLORIDA ,Jj 


NORTH CAROLINA 


41 


3.2% 


KENTUCKY ^ 


NORTH DAKOTA 


123 


9.6% 


PENNSYLVANIA | 


OHIO 


1741 


7.0% 


GEORGIA 1 


OKLAHOMA 


318 


6.9% 


MICHIGAN % 


OREGON 


388 


5.0% 


MASSACHUSETTS ^ 


PENNSYLVANIA 


1342 


6.2% 


MONTANA M 


RHODE ISLAND 


147 


5.5% 


NEVADA } 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


45 


3.8%^ 


TEXAS m 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


68 


6.9% 


CONNECTICUT J 


TENNESSEE 


329 


4.6% 


NEBRASKA ffl 


TEXAS 


1127 


6.7% 


MISSOURI ,<< 


UTAH 


121 


5.5% 


OKLAHOMA i 


VERMONT 


43 




SOUTH DAKOTA '" 


VIRGINIA 


147 


4.9% 


mrerm^ 


WASHINGTON 


933 


c 10/ 


OHIO i 


O.I /o 


WEST VIRGINIA 


238 


8.5% 


ALABAMA ' j 


WISCONSIN 


616 


5.6% 


IDAHO j 


WYOMING 


155 | 


10.2% 


MINNESOTA ' \ 


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


194 ! 


5.2% 


KANSAS j 1 


CANAL ZONE 


i ! 


2.9% 


CALIFORNIA j ' : 


PUERTO RICO 







HAWAII ;' ! 
MISSISSIPPI ■ 


ALBERTA 


138 i 


3.9% 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


296 { 


5.3% 


LOUISIANA | ! 


MANITOBA 


19 


1.3% 


IOWA | | 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


13 


1.4% 


WEST VIRGINIA ; 


NEWFOUNDLAND 


44 


3.2% 


DELAWARE fl 


NOVA SCOTIA 


88 


5.5% 


NEW MEXICO ' ' 


ONTARIO 


396 1 


2.7% 


VERMONT 


PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 


3 ! 


2.1% 


NEW YORK 


QUEBEC 


124 


2.1% 


NORTH DAKOTA j : 


SASKATCHEWAN 


47 


4.7% 


ARIZONA I 


YUKON TERRITORY 


2 


1.8% 


WYOMING £ 



lem in the years ahead. Only men who 
know their industry thoroughly can 
supervise others effectively. Good 
supervision also demands some knowl- 
edge of human psychology and the 
ability to get along with people. These 
things cannot be taught to an unre- 
sponsive individual, but the man who 
is perceptive and interested in people 
can sharpen his skills for leadership 
through good training. 

For all these reasons, I think that 
all of us should be looking toward a 
substantial broadening of our training 
courses for journeymen. 

The whole aspect of our trade is 
changing rapidly. But the adequately 
trained mechanics have little to fear. 
Our industry has never stood still. It 
was in a process of change from the 
day it was born. In my own time I 
saw the transition from the handsaw 
to the power saw take place. This 
was as radical a change as any we are 
facing today. But the men who had 
the proper training made the transition 
without too much difficulty. And I 
am sure that those who enter our 
trade today after completing appren- 
ticeship training and those journeymen 
who keep up their interest in learning 
more about their jobs will have little 
difficulty in adjusting to the changes 
ahead. 

I believe everybody gains from ap- 
prenticeship training. The trainee ac- 
quires a skill that can command for 
him a decent living standard and the 
respect of his fellow citizens. The em- 
ployer acquires an employe who 
knows his business and can turn out 
an acceptable day's work with a mini- 
mum of waste material or motion. 
The community gains because a 
trained and adequately paid citizen is a 
stable citizen. The nation gains be- 
cause skilled workers are the back- 
bone of the economic race against 
Communism. 

The nation is greatly disturbed be- 
cause our supply of scientists is too 
small. This, indeed, is cause for alarm. 
But a shortage of skilled mechanics 
can be just as dangerous. 

The scientists dream up new gadgets 
and weapons; but it takes skilled men 
to produce them. Unless there are 
enough skilled men to take the draw- 
ings of the scientists and translate 
them into working models of wood, 
metal, and ceramics, the dreams of the 
scientists come to nothing. 

I do not discount the importance 
of training more scientists, but I feel 
that the battle for survival against 
the Reds may, in the long run, hinge as 
much on adequate supplies of trained 



mechanics as it does on more scien- 
tists. 

Consequently, all of us who are in- 
volved in apprenticeship training in 
any way have a grave responsibility to 
recognize the challenge as it exists. 
Loyalty to our country, our union, 
and our industry demands as much. 

Presented herewith are two charts, 
setting forth various information con- 
cerning United Brotherhood appren- 
tices. This information is based upon 
the membership study, ending First 
Quarter, 1960, and agreements on file 
and current as of luly 1, 1960. 

Chart No. I sets forth the number 
of apprentices in each state and pro- 
vince and expresses their number as 
a per cent of journeymen. Also con- 
tained in this chart is a ranking table, 
listing the various areas according to 
their number of apprentices as a per 
cent of journeymen. This range is 
from 1.3% in Manitoba to 10.2% in 
Wyoming. The Brotherhood average 
is 7%, and 18 of the 63 areas have 
7% or more. 

Chart No. II sets forth the number 
of apprentices in each state and pro- 
vince and indicates apprentice wage 
schedule information. For various 
reasons, it would be impossible to 
obtain the absolute apprentice wage 
rate information for the various states 
and provinces; therefore, we have 
selected a particular District Council 
or Local Union in each of the states 
and provinces which would indicate 



the general practice in the state or 
province. The District Council or Lo- 
cal Union selected is shown under the 
column headed "Indicative L. U. or 
D. C." The "Starting Per Cent" col- 
umn indicates that of the 57 areas, 
only 12 areas established their starting 
rate on a dollars-and-cents basis, rather 
than as a per cent of journeyman- 
wage-rate; that the starting rate as a 
per cent of journeyman rate ranges 
from 32% in Massachusetts to 80% 
in Vermont; that 18 areas provide 
for a starting rate of 50% or less; and 
22 for a rate between 51% and 60% 
of the journeyman wage rate; 12 for a 
rate between 61% and 70% of the 
journeyman wage rate; and 5 pro- 
vide for a starting rate of 7 1 % or 
greater. The most frequent starting 
rate, however, is 60% of the journey- 
man wage rate. 

The "Starting Rate" column shows 
the dollars-and-cents starting rate in 
the various areas; it ranges from $1.05 
in Quebec to $3.04 in Alaska. Taking 
into account the starting wage rate and 
the number of apprentices in the vari- 
ous areas, the weighted average start- 
ing rate is $2.01. 

The "Interval" column shows the 
interval used for periodic advance- 
ment; the great majority (31) provide 
for an interval of 6 months; 18 pro- 
vide for annual periods; 4 provide for 
intervals based on number of hours, 
and 2 provide for periods of 3 months 
and 4 months. 




Two Carpenter apprentices work on an apprenticeship 
class problem. Training of Carpenters of the future 
is an important element in guaranteeing the nation 
needed manpower for the needs of a growing population. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



15 

















H 




UNITED 


BROTHERHOOD APPRENTICES 


^^^n^^H 


No. of 


INDICATIVE 


START- 


START- j 


. 1 


JOURNEY- 


AREA 1 


IPPRENTICES 


L.U. OR D.C. 


ING % 


ING RATE | 


HHJliiiil^HMAN RATE 


ALABAMA 


436 


TRI-STATE DC 


60% 


$1.98 


1 YR. 1 


$3.30 




ALASKA 


88 


ALASKA DC 


64% 


3.04 


1000 HRS. j 


4.75 




ARIZONA 


604 


(STATEWIDE) 


67%' 


2.525 


6 MOS. J 


3.775 




ARKANSAS 


119 


#690, LITTLE ROCK 


56% 


1.79 


6 MOS. 1 


3.20 




CALIFORNIA 


6774 


BAY COUNTIES DC 


60% 


2.235 


6 MOS. \ 


3.725 




COLORADO 


283 


DENVER DC 


60% 


2.16 


6 MOS. j 


3.60 




CONNECTICUT 


472 


BRIDGEPORT DC 


45% 


1.665 


6 MOS. | 


3.70 




DELAWARE 


122 


#626, WILMINGTON 


35% 


1.33 


6 MOS. 1 


3.80 




FLORIDA- 


875 


MIAMI DC 


52% 


1.81 


6 MOS. 


3.45 




GEORGIA 


328 


#225, ATLANTA 


58%* 


1.93 


6 MOS. j 


3.35 




HAWAII 


92 


#745, HONOLULU 


50% 


1.55 


6 MOS. 


3.10 




IDAHO 


155 


ROCKY MOUNTAIN DC 


50% 


1 .625 


6 MOS. 


3.25 




ILLINOIS 


2393 


CHICAGO DC 


50%* 


1.95 


1 YR. 


3.91 




INDIANA 


641 


CENTRAL INDIANA DC 


72 % 2 


2.55 


6 MOS. 


3.55 




IOWA 


402 


TRI-CITY DC 


60% 


2.02 


1 YR. 


3.37 




KANSAS 


344 


#1445, TOPEKA 


65% 


x 2.11 


6 MOS. 


3.25 




KENTUCKY 


297 


FALLS CITIES DC 


60% 


2.145 


1 YR. 


3.575 




LOUISIANA 


706 


NEW ORLEANS DC 


57% 


1.85 


1 YR. 


3.25 




MAINE 


45 


#621, BANGOR 


70% 


1.855 


6 MOS. 


2.65 




MARYLAND 


142 


#101, BALTIMORE 


63%* 


2.02 


6 MOS. 


3.50 




MASSACHUSETTS 


834 


BOSTON DC 


32%** 


1.15 


3 MOS. 


3.65 




MICHIGAN 


1177 


DETROIT DC 


50% 


1.81 


4 MOS. 


3.63 




MINNESOTA 


977 


TWIN CITY DC 


50% 


1.725 


1000 HRS. 


3.45 




MISSISSIPPI 


295 


SOUTH MISSISSIPPI DC 


60% 


1.80 


1 YR. 


3.00 




MISSOURI 


1165 


ST. LOUIS DC 


50% 


1.91 


1 YR. 


3.825 




MONTANA 


275 


SOUTH CENTRAL DC 


79%* 


2.60 


1 YR. 


3.30 




NEBRASKA 


187 


OMAHA DC 


65% 


2.31 


6 MOS. 


3.55 




NEVADA 


146 


#971, RENO 


65% 


2.535 


6 MOS. 


3.90 




NEW HAMPSHIRE 


78 


#921, PORTSMOUTH 


60% 


2.055 


1 YR. 


3.425 




NEW JERSEY 


639 


ESSEX COUNTY DC 


35% 


1.575 


6 MOS. 


4.50 




NEW MEXICO 


212 


NEW MEXICO DC 


60% 


2.09 


6 MOS. 


3.49 




NEW YORK 


4148 


NEW YORK DC 


50% 


2.275 


1 YR. 


4.55 




NO. CAROLINA 


41 


#1469, CHARLOTTE 


60%* 


1.50 


6 MOS. 


2.50 




NO. DAKOTA 


123 


#1091 BISMARCK-MANDAN 


70%* 


1.87 


6 MOS. 


2.67 




OHIO 


1741 


CUYAHOGA DC 


49% 


2.01 


6 MOS. 


4.11 




OKLAHOMA 


318 


#1585, LAWTON 


60% 


1.74 


1 YR. 


2.90 




OREGON 


388 


(STATEWIDE) 


65% 


2.25 


6 MOS. 


3.46 




PENNSYLVANIA 


1342 


METROPOLITAN DC 


33 Vz 


1.295 


6 MOS. 


3.885 




RHODE ISLAND 


147 


PROVIDENCE DC 


50% 


1.70 


6 MOS. 


3.40 




SO. CAROLINA 


45 


#1907, ANDERSON 


57Vi% 


1.29 


6 MOS. 


2.25 




SO. DAKOTA 


68 


#587, PIERRE 


58% 


1.74 


6 MOS. 


3.00 




TENNESSEE 


329 


MIDDLE TENNESSEE DC 


60% 


1.92 


1 YR. 


3.20 




TEXAS 


1127 


HOUSTON DC 
(STATEWIDE) 


60% 


2.14 


6 MOS. 


3.565 




UTAH 


121 


65% 


2.145 


6 MOS. 


3.30 




VERMONT 


43 


#2256, WHITE RIVER JUCT. 


80% 


2.48 


1 YR. 


3.10 




VIRGINIA 


147 


EASTERN DC 


60% 


1.74 


1 YR. 


2.90 




WASHINGTON 


933 


SPOKANE DC 


70% 


2.44 


'< 1 YR. 


3.48 




W. VIRGINIA 


238 


#1207, CHARLESTON 


75%* 


2.85 


1 YR. 


3.775 




WISCONSIN 


616 


MILWAUKEE DC 


35% 


1.25 


780 HRS. 


3.57 




WYOMING 


155 


#469, CHEYENNE 


60% 


'1 .88 


1 YR. 


3.14 




DIST. OF COLUMBIA 


194 


WASHINGTON DC 


56% 


2.10 


6 MOS. 


3.75 




CANAL ZONE 


1 




Not Available 




4fe 






ALBERTA 


138 




Not Available 










BRITISH COLUMBIA 


296 


BR. COL. PROV. COUNCIL 


40% 


1.17 


6 MOS. 


2.92 




MANITOBA 


20 


#343, WINNIPEG 3 


Not Available 










NEW BRUNSWICK 


13 




Not Available 










NEWFOUNDLAND 


44 


#579, ST.. JOHNS 


50% 


.91 


| 6 MOS. 


1.82 




NOVA SCOTIA 


88 


CAPE BRETON ISLAND DC 


65%* 


1.52 


| 1000 HRS. 


2.35 




ONTARIO 


396 


CENTRAL ONTARIO DC 


60% 


1.47 


6 MOS. 


2.45 




PRINCE EDWARD ISL. 


3 




Not Available 










QUEBEC 


124 


MONTREAL DC 


50% 


1.05 


1 YR. 


2.10 




SASKATCHEWAN 


S & 


#1867, REGINA 


79% 


1.78 


N.A. 


2.25 




YUKON TERRITORY 


1 2 




Not Available 






^^^^ 




* Starting rate state 


d in dollars 


and cents; starting % calcula 


ted. 








** Starting rate inc 


reases to $ 


1.91 (52%) after 6 weeks. 










' Starting rate $1 .2 


5 less than 


Journeyman rate; starting % 


calculated. 








2 Starting rate $1.C 


less than 


Journeyman rate; starting % 


calculated. 








3 Per Apprenticeship 


Board of M 


anitoba. 











IBM TO MAIL 



WHAT HAPPENED TO THE 
SPIRIT OF NATHAN HALE? 

LAST month the bones of Nathan Hale must have 
turned over in their grave. Every school boy knows 
the story of Nathan Hale, who, when captured and con- 
victed of spying by the British during the struggle for 
independence, told his captors, "/ am sorry I have but one 
life to give for my country." 

By way of contrast — and a very sorry con- 
trast it is, indeed — Francis Powers, the U-2 
pilot who found himself in similar straits before 
a Russian court a few weeks ago, bartered his 
birthright for a light sentence. 

In effect, he said: "Look, I am just a poor country 
boy doing what I was told to do. The fault lies with 
my country. What I did was wrong, but the guys 
who sent me are to blame. If anybody is to be con- 
demned, condemn them, not me." 

Between the attitude of Nathan Hale and that of 
Francis Powers a hundred and eighty years of history 
stretch. In the time of Nathan Hale the United States did 
not even exist. But at the time of Francis Powers, 180 
million people were trying to keep the torch of liberty 
aflame in a world shot through with totalitarianism in 
divers forms. 

The United States is not perfect. But it 
comes closer to perfection than any other form 
of government ever conceived by the mind of 
man. There is poverty in America — and we 
have spoken out against it many, many times. 
But it is not hopeless, grinding poverty with 
roots deeply imbedded in caste, class, or birth- 
right. It is poverty based on happenstance 
rather than circumstance. It is poverty that can 
be cured and for that matter is being cured by 
leaps and bounds. 

There is discrimination in America. But the people 
who are discriminated against feel no compunction to flee 
to climates that lure them with rosy promises. In fact, 
the blacks, browns and reds who berate us most loudly 
for discrimination cast longing eyes toward our shores. 
But for the immigration restrictions that exist, millions 
of them would gladly migrate to our small portion of the 
world. We need no laws to keep our citizens from 
emigrating, but we do need rigid immigration laws to 
keep ourselves from being swamped by floods of new- 
comers of every race, creed, and color. Surely this indi- 
cates that what discrimination still exists is neither as 
evil nor as hopeless as our enemies picture it. And dis- 
crimination, too, is being eliminated by slow degrees. 

There is materialism in America, materalism that 
dilutes the spiritual values of life and obscures the 
things of lasting consequence. But the rest of the 




world is desperately endeavoring to achieve a 
meager approximation of our living standards, and 
we are spending billions annually endeavoring to 
help them achieve this end. 

Never before in human history has one nation been so 
generous and open-handed with friend and foe alike. It 
is difficult to establish a firm figure, but common sense 
indicates that the average American family must have 
contributed several thousand dollars in taxes to keep the 
foreign-aid program in effect since the end of World 
War II. If that is materialism, it is the kind the world 
needs more of everywhere. 

In the final analysis, it is clear that the United States 
and Canada have achieved the kind of glory Nathan Hale 
visualized as worth dying for. The question is, have 
enough of the spirit and dedication of Nathan Hale sur- 
vived through the centuries to keep the dream alive in 
an age when totalitarianism batters at our gates on all 
sides? 

This is a question each of us must answer for 
himself. Few of us will ever find ourselves 
facing foreign courts as Francis Powers did, but 
we all are required to answer the question in 
countless little ways every day. The question 
confronts us on election day, because register- 
ing and voting are vital parts of true citizenship. 
It plagues us when we drive a car, fill out an 
income tax blank, or hear disrespectful words 
spoken of our President, Congressmen or 
courts. It is there when the Khrushchevs and 
Castros (either the home-grown variety or the 
real thing) attack us and berate us with weasel 
words. 

On too many sides we see people giving Francis 
Powers' answer rather than Nathan Hale's. In this direc- 
tion lies little hope for the future. 



A PROUD RECORD 

A CONVENTION is a time for laying future plans. 
However, before new courses can be charted it is 
essential to know what pathways have been traveled and 
how much progress has been made. Therefore, a brief 
review of our efforts over the last couple of years is in 
order. 

As a free and independent labor organization, we have 
many responsibilities in addition to improving wages and 
bettering working conditions. However, wage rates are 
a matter of prime importance. They constitute the best 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



17 



measuring stick for gauging the progress a union is 
making. 

Using wage scales as a measuring stick, 
what kind of progress has our Brotherhood 
made since the 28th General Convention? 

The answer is to be found in statistics com- 
piled by the Department of Labor. Each quar- 
ter the Department surveys wage rates for seven 
basic building trades in 100 major cities. Car- 
pentry is one of the trades included. 
When the Department concluded its 1959 survey, the 
figures showed that our members headed the wage parade 
during the all-important second quarter, when the vast 
bulk of building trades contracts are renewed. A release 
issued by the Department of Labor on August 3, 1959, 
summed up the situation as follows: 



"Reflecting numerous spring and early sum- 
mer contract reopenings, wage increases at the 
quarter raised the average scale 9.94. Gains 
for individual trades varied from 4.24 for paint- 
ers to 11.94 FOR CARPENTERS. Higher 
wage scales were reported for two of three con- 
struction workers included in the Bureau's 
quarterly survey of seven major building trades 
in 100 major cities. Rates advanced for 79% 
OF THE CARPENTERS, 75% of the brick- 
layers, 73%> of building laborers, and from 
55% to 67% of the workers in each of the 
other trades." 



The figures speak for themselves. They show that our 
members received the greatest average wage increase in 
the building trades. And they also show that a larger per- 
centage of our members got wage increases than was the 
case in any other group. That was in 1959. 

What is the story for the second quarter of 
this year? Let us again quote a news release 
from the Department of Labor. This one is 
dated August 8, 1960. 



"Wage negotiations in numerous spring and 
early summer contract reopenings advanced the 
hourly wage scale for all building construction 
workers 9.84 during the second quarter of 
1960. Among the individual trades studied, 
the increases ranged from 6.34 for plasterers, 
to 10.94 FOR CARPENTERS. For bricklayers 
and electricians the advances were 104. 

"Pay scales were increased for two-thirds of 
the building trades workers surveyed. Rates ad- 
vanced for 76% of THE CARPENTERS and 
for 56%o to 66%> of the workers in each of the 
other trades." 



So in 1960, as in 1959, our organization secured the 
largest average wage increase in the building trades dur- 
ing the all-important second quarter. Similarly, a larger 
percentage of our members received increases than was 
the case in any other union. 

No comment is needed because the statis- 
tics tell the whole story. 



"When X-113 
learned that the 
union had suc- 
ceeded in replac- 
ing him with a 
man, he went all 
to pieces!". 




Sz%wS 



Jurisdiction is another important aspect of our opera- 
tions. How well we protect our jurisdiction reflects itself 
in how steadily our members work. How did we do in 
maintaining our jurisdiction? 

A breakdown of cases before the Joint Board 
for the Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes in 
which we were involved last year shows that 
we did very well indeed. 

In 1959 our Brotherhood processed some 238 cases 
before the Joint Board. Figures show that we were suc- 
cessful in gaining favorable decisions in 229 of these. 
In nine instances our position was not upheld. 

By an odd coincidence, other trades also processed 238 
cases involving us. In these, we gained favorable deci- 
sions in 67 instances. Totaling up all cases involving our 
organization, we gained 296 favorable decisions during 
the year and failed to carry our point in only 180. 

These figures, too, hardly necessitate editorializing. 



Another extremely important aspect of our responsibil- 
ities is organizing. In this area, too, our progress has 
been consistently good. Last year, a year in which the 
1958 depression was still making its effects felt, figures 
show that we initiated 97,065 new members. Unfortu- 
nately, nearly as many members (89,874) dropped out 
of our organization for various reasons. The result was 
only a nominal membership gain, but in an era when 
many international unions are actually losing ground 
due to higher productivity per man, the record of 97,000 
initiations is a very good one. 

Adding it all up, our progress under a 
capable and dedicated set of officers has been 
outstanding. Under their leadership we have 
forged ahead in spite of an anti-labor climate 
and spotty economic conditions. Building on 
this firm foundation, we can chart bold new 
courses with confidence. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



LABOR HAS ALWAYS BEEN IN 
POLITICS 

ANY idea that "Labor in Politics" is something new 
in the American political scene is overwhelmingly 
refuted in an AFL-CIO pamphlet just published with the 
striking title, "Union Political Activity Spans 230 Years 
of U. S. History." 

The pamphlet lists many highly constructive laws 
which have been enacted through the political 
activities of organized labor — laws which have aided 
enormously in the growth of America's high stand- 
ard of living and today are accepted as basic parts 
of American life. 

The pamphlet is based on a legal brief, which has been 
submitted to the Supreme Court in a Georgia case in- 
volving the use of union dues under a union shop con- 
tract for political and legislative activities. It helps to 
explain why reactionary business and interest groups have 
been waging a bitter campaign to drive labor "out of 
politics" at any cost. 

"American labor went into politics as early 
as the 1730's," says the pamphlet, which then 
traces step by step the activities of workers not 
only on the collective bargaining front but on 
the political front, where democracies determine 
the social and economic lives of their people. 



Here are some of the outstanding achievements on the 
legislative front that have been scored with labor help 
over the years: 

• Unceasing advances in the fight for civil liberties. 

• The early Nineteenth Century fight for the 
10-hour day in a world that toiled from sun- 
rise to sunset. 

• The fight for public education that opened the 
way for American workers to climb from the 
bottom of the economic ladder to the very top. 

• The fight for child labor laws to protect our 
children from cruel exploitation. 

• The fight for the 8-hour day, won, at least for 
government employees, as early as 1866. 

• The fight for currency reforms, national and 
state bureaus of labor statistics, the prohibi- 
tion of convict labor and the suspension of 
the importation of servile labor. 

• The fight to make collective bargaining accepted 
as American policy in labor-management rela- 
tions, to make the 8-hour day universal, to banish 
sweat-shop labor and the exploitation of women, 
factory and mine safety. 

• The great reform measures of the New and 
Fair Deals, strongly supported by labor, giv- 
ing us the social security system, public works 
programs, the 40-hour, five-day week, un- 
employment compensation, the minimum 
wage. 



All these are milestones in American history, fought 



for by organized labor in the political arena, sometimes 
against overwhelming odds. 

They represent immense accomplish- 
ments in the interest of the welfare of all 
the American people and raise the legiti- 
mate question of whether they would ever 
have been enacted had the country's 
Chambers of Commerce and National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers succeeded in 
driving labor "out of politics," as they are 
now trying to do. — PAI. 




VICTORY IN DEFEAT 

IN its closing hours, the bobtailed, midsummer session 
of Congress passed a medical aid bill for senior 
citizens. It may be stretching the imagination a bit to 
dignify this hodgepodge measure with the title, "Medical 
Aid Bill for Aged Citizens," because it does not even 
scratch the surface of the problem, but at least it is a 
start in the right direction. 

It actually gives senior citizens nothing, be- 
cause any aid they get through the measure is 
dependent on action by individual states. Any- 
one conversant with the reluctance of states to 
enact good social legislation knows that only a 
handful of truly progressive states can be 
counted on to do anything about implementing 
the medical aid bill. 

Despite this fact, however, passage of the bill was a 
tremendous victory. Weak as it is, the medical aid bill 
is the first really new piece of social legislation passed 
since New Deal days. Nearly every recent session of 
Congress has enacted some social legislation, but until 
the medical aid bill was adopted last month it was always 
an expansion or liberalization of a bill born during the 
FDR era. 

What makes the medical aid bill important is the fact 
that it puts the Federal government on record as recogniz- 
ing an obligation toward helping older citizens solve their 
medical problems. Once a social reform is entered on 
the statute books it usually is there to stay. Subsequent 
sessions of Congress usually improve it from time to 
time so that eventually it does the kind of a job that 
needs doing. 

Getting medical aid for senior citizens recognized 
as a legitimate responsibility of the Federal govern- 
ment constituted a real achievement. 

The ideal bill is one which integrates medical aid into 
the existing Social Security system. This important end 
was not achieved this time. But it is a foregone conclu- 
sion that sooner or later it will be, because that is where 
medical aid belongs. 

It is already time to start working to- 
ward this end. It may take several sessions 
of Congress to get the job done, but Rome 
was not built in a day. The more pressure 
that is exerted on Congress, the sooner 
will a real medical aid bill be enacted. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



19 




MEMORABLE MILESTONES 



Pre-Organization Period 



1660- 



172 



1620 — More carpenters on Mayflower than any other 
vocation. 

-Carpenters in Colony of Massachusetts have 
specific wage scale set at two shillings a day. 
Law provides: "nor shall any man give more 
under pain of a fairly heavy fine." 
-One of first labor organizations in America is 
"Ship Carpenters and Caulkers Club" of Boston. 
Idea of a Boston tea party is first promulgated 
in meeting of carpenters and caulkers. 

1724 — Carpenters Company of Philadelphia is organized, 
and includes master and journeymen carpenters. 

1771 — Meetings of Colonial Congress prior to Declara- 
tion of Independence are held in meeting hall of 
the Carpenters Company. 

1791 — Journeymen carpenters' unions set up in Phila- 
delphia. 

1795 — Unions established in New York, Carlisle, Pa., 
Halifax, N. S., Savannah, Ga., and Boston, Mass. 

1831 — Sept. 22 — Journeymen Carpenters' Union of Pitts- 



burgh, Pa., hold meeting to protest long work day. 
Early in the nineteenth century, Seth Luther, 
carpenter organizer and vigorous advocate of a 
free public school system, sparked program for 
ten-hour day for trade. 

1836 — October 24 — National Convention of Carpenters 
is held, promoted by the Philadelphia Association 
of Journeymen House Carpenters. Ten-hour day 
is chief topic. Other locals are organized in this 
period: Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Greenpoint, L. I., and St. Louis. 

1853 — Ship Caulkers Association of San Francisco is 
formed. 

1854 — Effort is made to organize a National Carpenters 
Union of America, but fails. 

1865 — Similar effort fails. 

1872 — A National Woodworkers' Union meets in 
Syracuse, N. Y., but this is apparently only step 
taken. Efforts to form a national union fail to jell. 



Events Since Brotherhood's Establishment 



1881 — August 8 — 36 delegates meet in Chicago from 14 
locals in 1 1 cities to organize Brotherhood of 




: . '": 



1 






Carpenters and Joiners of America. Gabriel Ed- 
monston, Washington, D. C, a Civil War veteran, 
is named general president, and Peter J. McGuire, 
St. Louis, Mo., general secretary; he is editor of 
publication. The Carpenter. McGuire is called the 
"Father of Labor Day." 

1882 — January 30 — Brotherhood of Carpenters issues 
first charter to Local Union No. 1 in Washington, 
D. C; 29 charters in 22 cities issued first year. 

1882 — March — Financial balance sheet of new national 
union shows a surplus of $4, but locals are re- 
porting success in organizing and in securing 
better wages and hours. 

1882 — August 1 — Second annual convention held in 
Philadelphia. Convention adds two pages to The 
Carpenter (for German language use); endorses 
9-hour day, urges locals to take active part in 
building trades councils. 

1883 — May — San Francisco establishes 9-hour day; fol- 
lowed by similar success in Oakland, Alameda, 
San Rafael and other coastal cities; movement 
spreads eastward. 

1883 — By mail ballot union members through The Car- 
penter vote to forego convention this year. Dues 
are being increased to 50 cents monthly and 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



initiation fee generally $2; many locals introduce 
sick and accidents benefits. 

Edmonston introduces in Federation of Labor 
Convention series of resolutions calling for 8-hour 
day to take effect May, 1886. 
August 5 — Fourth annual convention held at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and adopts official emblem; rule, 
compass, jack plane within shield; headquarters 
moved to Cleveland; 8-hour day a lively issue. 
1886 — American Federation of Labor is founded with 
Carpenters participating; Carpenter headquarters 
moved to Philadelphia about this time. 



188^ 




1886-1888 — Executive Board adopts basic policy 
governing apprenticeship training. Basic rule 
states: "Any boy or person hereafter engaging 
himself to learn the trade of carpentry shall be 
required to serve a regular apprenticeship of four 
consecutive years, and shall not be considered a 
journeyman unless he has complied with this 
rule and is 21 years of age at completion of his 
apprenticeship." 

1888 — Fifth convention in Detroit, Mich., 100 delegates 
from 78 locals present. United Order of Car- 
penters is amalgamated with Brotherhood of Car- 
penters. (United, founded in 1872, had 5,000 
members.) New organization called "United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America." Brotherhood jurisdiction divided into 
seven districts and with seven vice presidents. 
Wages reported from $2.25 to $3.00 per day. 

1889 — AFL Executive Council selects the Carpenters to 
spearhead fight for 8-hour day because they are 
best organized. 

1894 — Eighth general convention held in Indianapolis; 
panic of '93 still affecting economy; tight money, 
unemployment, wage cuts and political action are 
prime topics. 

1896 — Ninth general convention held in Cleveland. 

1873-1898 — United Order of Boxmakers and Sawyers 
was very active in Chicago over this period. 
Negotiations for merger went on for many years. 
Not until 1918 did this organization finally be- 
come a part of the United Brotherhood. Women 
members given first recognition. 



1899 — Major agreement is made in Chicago between 
Carpenters Executive Council of Chicago and 
contracting carpenters and builders, providing for 
closed shop and wage and hour benefits. 

1900 — Following above agreement in Chicago an em- 
ployers' lockout took place which required great 
financial resources and aid and 13 months struggle 
to break. 

1900 — Eleventh general convention held in Scranton, Pa., 
in which general secretary reports "wondrous in- 
crease in membership and marvelous growth in 
local unions." A Brotherhood label for use on all 
union-made products is adopted. 

1901- — July 23 — General Secretary-treasurer Peter Mc- 
Guire is retired, taking from scene one of grand 
old men of labor. Retirement made permanent 
April 30, 1902. Frank Duffy, New York, suc- 
ceeds him, beginning official career lasting next 
47 years. 

1902 — October 15 — Union referendum approves union 
label. 

1902 — Atlanta, Ga., convention decides to move head- 
quarters to Indianapolis, Ind., and that general 
officers of United Brotherhood include president, 
two vice presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, plus 
a General Executive Board of seven members. 
Headquarters is in seven rooms in Stevenson 
Building in Indianapolis. 

1904 — September 19 — Thirteenth general convention 
held at Milwaukee, Wis., 497 delegates present 
and 25 cents monthly tax voted for general office. 

1906 — September general convention held in Niagara 
Falls, N. Y.; delegates vote to buy site and erect 
own building. 

1908 — September 21 — Fifteenth general convention 
meets in Salt Lake City, Utah, with only 284 dele- 
gates present; several financial proposals are 
vetoed in referendum. 

1909 — July 22 — New headquarters building is dedicated 
at 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, a 60 by 
1 00 foot structure. 

1910 — September 19 — Sixteenth general convention 
meets in Des Moines, Iowa, and union is honored 
by Governor, various public officials in big parade 
and pageant. 




SEPTEMBER, 1960 



21 



1912 — September 16 — Samuel Gompers gives chief 
speech at seventeenth general convention in Wash- 
ington, D. C. About this time General President 
William D. Huber resigns after almost 13 years, 
saying, "The salary you pay your general officers 
is insufficient. I have been a pauper for 12 years. 
That is long enough for me. I have been on the 
road about two-thirds of the time and allowed 
only $1.50 a day spending money, and I have 
met Presidents, Congressmen, from the highest to 
the lowest." 

1912 — -Amalgamated Woodworkers International Union, 
which competed with the United Brotherhood for 
25 years, is absorbed by the United Brotherhood. 
The same year, the charter of the Amalgamated 
Society of Carpenters, a union made up largely 
of English immigrants, is revoked by AFL. 

1915 — October 8 — First Vice President William L. 
Hutcheson becomes General President upon the 
death of President James Kirby. Hutcheson be- 
gins career extending to 1952. 



. :_i: :: .:;::.r :e:: 



^■■■■■■i 




1920- 
1920- 



-September 20 — Twentieth general convention held 
in Indianapolis with 636 delegates present. 
1923 — Problem of a Home for Aged Carpenters 
and an Old Age Pension Program resolved during 
this period. Membership approves idea of a 
home and the pension program. A suitable site 
is bought in Lake County, Florida (1,684 acres). 
Contract signed and payment of $100,000, Decem- 
ber 15, 1923. Construction completed March 1, 
1928, at cost of $1,494,000. 

1928 — October 1 — Twenty-second general convention 
held at the Carpenters Home; official dedication 
takes place. 

1929 — January 1 — Home is opened. 

1929 — April 1 — Payment of pensions under new pro- 
gram begins. 

1931 — Fiftieth anniversary year. Many celebrations held 
throughout United States and Canada. 

1932 — Due to depression conditions, the general con- 
vention scheduled for this year is postponed. 

1935 — AFL Executive Council awards jurisdiction of 
Lumber, Timber and Sawmill Workers, Veneer 
Workers, Shingle Weavers and similar branches 



of the trade to our Brotherhood. These are 
chartered as non-beneficial local unions; later 
these become semi-beneficial, and finally beneficial 
members. 

1941 — August 18 — Sixtieth anniversary of founding is 
celebrated in Chicago Stadium with President 
William Green and Secretary-Treasurer George 
Meany appearing. General President Hutcheson 
relates story of the union during a special 30- 
minute NBC broadcast. 

1941 — United Brotherhood wins Supreme Court case 
quashing efforts of Justice Department to bring 
unions under Sherman Anti-Trust Act. A tre- 
mendous victory for all labor. 

1941 — December 7 — War breaks out and General Presi- 
dent William L. Hutcheson pledges all-out support 
from United Brotherhood; 75,000 members serve 
in armed forces during conflict. 

1942 — June — Membership passes 500,000 mark. 

1942 — Wage stabilization goes into effect. 

1942 — Brotherhood initiates a program that provides a 
million free cigarettes a month to servicemen for 
the duration. 

1943 — Seabees organized and many Brotherhood mem- 
bers serve in this unit which makes outstanding 
war record. 

1946 — April 22 — Twenty-fifth general convention — first 
post-war convention — held at Lakeland, Fla. 

1948 — General President William L. Hutcheson ap- 
pointed member of 12-man Labor-Management 
panel by President Truman. 

1948 — United Brotherhood participates in formation of 
National Joint Board for Settlement of Jurisdic- 
tional Disputes. 

1948 — July 31 — General Secretary Frank Duffy retires 
after 47 years of outstanding service. 

1950 — Sept. 5 — Twenty-sixth General Convention held at 
Cincinnati. 

1951 — December — Membership reaches 800,000 mark. 

1952 — January 1 — First General Vice President Maurice 
A. Hutcheson becomes General President by terms 
of our Constitution when William L. Hutcheson 
resigns to become General President Emeritus. 

1952 — August 9 — Memorial to Peter J. McGuire dedi- 
cated on 100th anniversary of his birth. 

1953 — October 20 — William L. Hutcheson, General 
President Emeritus, dies in Indianapolis. 

1954 — November 15 — Twenty-seventh General Conven- 
tion held at Cincinnati. 

1955 — January — AFL and CIO merge after twenty years 
of conflict. 

1955 — August 3 — Executive Board approves purchase of 
Mettler's Woods, 65-acre island of primeval forest 
50 miles from New York City, as memorial to 
William L. Hutcheson. Under trusteeship of Rut- 
gers University, the woods are to be a perpetual 
forest laboratory. 
October 15 — Formal dedication of Memorial. 

1955 — July 1 1 — General Secretary Emeritus Frank Duffy 
passes away at age 94 after 70 years in Carpenters 
Union. 

1956 — October 23 — Twelve hundred attend seventy-fifth 
anniversary dinner at Washington, D. C. 

1958 — October 17 — Building site in Washington, D. C, 
purchased. 

1959 — December — Construction begins on Headquarters 
Building. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



The 



' • M 



WILLIAM L. 






..♦•' 



• ',■%.- 



HUTCHESON 
MEMORIAL 



FOREST 



«n 



at Rutgers 



fi the State University 



'-;- ' 







yiMt "*% 




THE William L. Hutcheson Me- 
morial Forest is bearing impor- 
tant scientific fruit. Scientists at Rut- 
gers University are reaping a plentiful 
harvest as they use the forest as a 
living laboratory for a variety of proj- 
ects designed to unlock the mysteries 
of the woods and forest ecology. 

Dedicated five years ago in memory 
of the beloved president of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America, the 136-acre tract 
near East Millstone, N. J., is one of 
the few hardwood forests of the east- 
ern United States which has remained 
practically undisturbed since the time 
of the Indians. 

A woodland sector of 65 acres is 
surrounded by fields which are now 



being allowed to grow back into their 
natural state. The area is thus an in- 
valuable study aid for scientists in- 
vestigating the methods and processes 
used by nature in developing and 
maintaining a forest free from human 
interference. 

According to Dr. Murray F. Buell, 
professor of botany at Rutgers and 
director of the forest, research activi- 
ties are currently being conducted in 
many phases of forest ecology. The 
most recently inaugurated projects 
deal with rainfall interception, bird 
population, flowers and insects. Many 
other studies are in various stages of 
completion. 

This summer's bird census is under 
the direction of Dr. Jeff Swinebroad, 
ornithologist at Douglass College, 
women's division of Rutgers. Dr. 
Swinebroad employs fine nets which 
provide a painless method of catch- 
ing, banding, counting and finally re- 
leasing the birds. 

Dr. Swinebroad's counting method 
has been introduced in an effort to 
check the accuracy of the traditional 
"singing male count." Researchers 



employing the latter system count the 
birds according to prevalent songs in 
particular areas of the forest. 

Dr. Swinebroad and other scientists 
have conducted various studies of the 
forest's bird population in the past. 
These are important since birds play 
a vital role in the life and regenera- 
tion of the forest. 

Another census is being conducted 
by Miss Karen Frei, teaching assistant 
in botany. Miss Frei is recording the 
various species of flowers in the forest 
and their habitats. 

William Reiners, teaching assistant 
in botany, is heading the rainfall in- 
terception project. He is searching for 
a method of studying rainfall inter- 
ception and stem flow. Such knowl- 
edge is valuable since it enables the 
scientist to record the amount of rain- 
fall which finds its way into the 
ground for use in plant root systems 
and in water reservoirs. 

A study of the population density 
of the insects in the forest litter is be- 
ing directed by Paul Shubeck, a grad- 
uate student. This study differs from 
another insect project, begun two 





years ago, which involves an insect 
census of the entire memorial forest. 

Projects which have been continued 
from other years are exploring the re- 
lationships of plants, animals and the 
general forest environment. Some of 
these studies are nearing completion; 
others could conceivably continue for 
years to come. 



Dr. John A. Small, associate pro- 
fessor of botany, is investigating the 
effect of drought on the trees. The 
study was prompted by a severe dry 
period in 1957 and has continued as 
the scientist attempts to discover 
which trees are killed by drought and 
which can escape into dormancy and 
subsequently resume normal growth. 



The fungi of the forests are being 
studied by Dr. Small. Fungi play a 
key role in the decomposition of forest 
plants and the return to the soil of 
nutritive material. 

Dr. Small has joined with Dr. and 
Mrs. Buell in a study of the growth 
and periodicity of the woods. The 
scientists continuously record various 
aspects of tree growth such as annual 
inception and termination, date of leaf- 
ing out, flowering and leaf fall. The 
project is, therefore, of a long-term 
nature. 

Although the more than 8,000 trees 
are the forest's most conspicuous fea- 
ture, considerable attention is also be- 
ing given the animals who make their 
homes on the forest floor. Typical 
of this research is a study of the forest 
mammals which is being conducted 
by Dr. Paul G. Pearson, associate pro- 
fessor of zoology. Dr. Pearson has 
observed the relationship between oc- 
currence of mammals and different 
types of vegetation within the forest 
and has also compared the population 
of the woodland area to that of the 
surrounding fields. 

These research programs and the 
many others which are in progress 
might well be said to have had their 



Carpenters at work on a com- 
bination caretaker's home and 
laboratory which they volun- 
teered to build at the William 
L. Hutcheson Memorial Forest. 
The efforts of these New Jer- 
sey volunteers are making it 
possible to protect the me- 
morial forest from vandalism. 




~-\ 



flS* 





beginning on October 11, 1955. It 
was on that date that the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers turned over the deed of the forest 
to Rutgers, thus preserving a priceless 
natural shrine. 

Before the Brotherhood entered the 
picture, it appeared that the forest 
would fall victim to the woodsman's 
ax. In fact, many of the trees had 
already been marked in preparation 
for their destruction. 

The forest, originally known as 
Mettler's Woods, had been occupied 
by white settlers as early as 1701. 
Fire scars indicated that Indians had 
deliberately set fire to the area at the 
beginning of the 17th century. There 
was evidence that the 65 acres in the 
forest's easternmost sector had re- 
mained undisturbed since the Ice Age. 
But, in 1955, it seemed that this long 
history was about to be brought to 
a close. 

The only sizeable natural disturb- 
ance ever recorded in the forest al- 
most sounded its death knell. A se- 
vere storm in November, 1950, felled 
many trees and led to some consider- 
able salvaging operations. It was the 
human invasion for salvaging pur- 
poses, rather than the loss of trees, 
which assumed near-tragic propor- 
tions. 

As prospective buyers became 
aware of the economic value of the 
fallen lumber, they began to covet 
the entire forest, healthy trees not- 
withstanding. By 1954, the increasing 
real estate potential of the area had 
combined with the lumber factor to 
induce Thomas Mettler, the most re- 
cent owner, to relinquish the property. 

Recognizing the fact that Rutgers 
had been conducting research in the 
woods for some 20 years, Metier 
offered to sell the tract to the Univer- 



Douglass College students with instructor, Dr. John Small, collect insect 
specimens at edge of the Hutcheson Memorial Forest, Rutgers University. 



sity at a price far below its actual 
value. But neither Rutgers nor the 
State of New Jersey could raise the 
necessary money. 

At this point, a group of ctitizens 
formed a Commitee for the Preserva- 
tion of Mettler's Woods. Almost 1 500 
individuals and numerous organiza- 
tions aided the committee as it at- 
tempted to raise the $100,000 needed 
for the purchase of the tract and the 
establishment of study programs. 
Gifts were received from 38 states and 
from seven foreign countries. 

But by June of 1955, the commit- 



tee had raised only slightly more than 
half of the required amount. The 
effort, heroic though it was, seemed 
doomed to failure. 

It was then that the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners liter- 
ally rescued the forest from the exe- 
cutioner's block. Stimulated by its 
New Jersey membership and by a fine 
article in LIFE Magazine, the Brother- 
hood decided to provide the funds 
needed to save the forest and to turn 
it over to Rutgers for research and 
study by experts in various fields. 

Not only did the Brotherhood's 





promise better forests in the future 
receive the carpenter's support. 

These words were once more con- 
verted into deeds in 1959 when car- 
penters again came to the aid of the 
forest. In the preceding spring, van- 
dals had stolen the newly-planted 
shrubs from the base of the forest's 
magnificent redwood entrance arch. 
To prevent similar occurrences in the 
future, the New Jersey State Council 
of Carpenters rounded up volunteers 
from local unions in central and 
northern New Jersey and produced a 
$20,000 six-room caretaker's house, 
complete with garage and basement 
laboratory. 

The unselfish action of these car- 
penters, who gave up their weekends 
to build this house, was lauded in 
newspapers throughout the state. 
They had once again proved that 
"whatever happens in the woodlands 
of America is close to the carpenter's 
heart." 



generous gift of $75,000 guarantee the 
preservation of a natural shrine; it 
also freed the sum previously collected 
by the citizens' committee and enabled 
Rutgers to establish a research fund 
with this money. 

On October 11, 1955, dedication 
day, the woods were officially re- 
named The William L. Hutcheson 
Memorial Forest. It was fiting that 
the beloved president of the Brother- 
hood should be so honored. Huche- 
son, who grew up in the woods of 
Michigan, worked for wise manage- 
ment and conservation of natural re- 
sources throughout his lifetime. 

In another sense, it was fitting that 
the Brotherhood should have come to 
the rescue of the forest. As President 
Maurice A. Hutcheson pointed out in 
a speech at the dedication ceremonies: 

"As a whole, carpenters have, I be- 
lieve, a greater interest in our forests 
and woods than any other branch of 
society. The kinship between car- 
penter and wood is as old as man- 
kind." 

Hutcheson added that whatever 
happens in the woodlands of America 
is close to the carpenter's heart and 
that scientific advancements which 



Dr. Murray F. Buell, Rutgers 
University botanist, measures 
one of the largest trees in the 
65-acre Hutcheson Forest tract. 










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BKm .■/ ? ^B 




MB J 


J^^^-^tB ^^, 'f'SJUiP? ggpP'* | B-U" "*. *l'i_JP 


PROGRESS REPORT 


■; 


■ 1 ' jj 






/ 









By O. William Blaier 

Second General Vice President 

YOU cannot work in Washington 
for years — as I have done — with- 
out learning something of the tugging, 
hauling, and political in-fighting that 
go on constantly in the Halls of Con- 
gress and the inner rooms of the 
White House, as pressure groups en- 
deavor to impose their wishes on the 
nation. 

Whether we like it or not, our form 
of government more and more is be- 
coming a contest of pressure groups. 
Lobbying has become a lucrative and 
highly specialized profession. There 
are men in Washington who draw 
fabulous salaries from Big Business 
for doing nothing more strenuous 
than trying to influence the votes of 
Congressmen; with favors if possible; 
with threats after all else fails. 



Lobbying is a 24-hour-a-day, year- 
around proposition. Some of the work 
is done in the offices and halls of 
government buildings. But it carries 
over into cocktail parties, dinners, 
sporting events, etc. 

All this buttering-up and kowtowing 
do not add to the stature of democ- 
racy. But that's the way things are. 
Since nothing short of a major up- 
heaval can change the situation, the 
only alternative open to labor is to 
accept the climate as it exists and 
to operate within it as effectively as 
possible. 

Against the polished and highly 
paid, professional lobbyist of Big Busi- 
ness, labor's efforts seem relatively 
puny — until the story of David and 
Goliath is recalled. Other than the 
representation which organized labor 
provides him, the working man has 
little or no voice in the legislative halls 



the future belongs 
to the prepared 



of the capital. Yet nearly everything 
that goes on in Washington affects 
him to greater or lesser degree. With- 
out the strong labor voice speaking 
in his behalf, his job, his home, and 
his whole future would be consider- 
ably less secure. 

He is well aware of the fact that 
the enemies of labor are on the march 
once again. Much has already been 
said about the new laws which have 
been enacted placing unfair restrictions 
on unions with, it is feared, the ulti- 
mate end being to fetter organized 
labor and silence its united voice. 

The enemies of organized labor are 
smarter today than they were a hun- 
dred years ago. And they now have 
at their command a whole new arsenal 
of anti-union weapons. Madison Ave- 
nue is headquarters, with a vast major- 
ity of the nation's newspapers, radio 
and television stations strategically 
placed in key posts. 

To conquer this will be a long and 
arduous task, but we must realize that 
our basic strength rests in people, and 
we must arouse our people and enlist 
their support in behalf of progressive 
trade unionism. We must have unity 
of purpose and unity of effort to pre- 
vail. 

Unfortunately, at a time when there 
is a movement of anti-labor conserva- 
tism threatening to undercut the foun- 
dations of our free and independent 
labor movement, there are also hidden 
and subtle threats which might lead to 
the destruction of the construction in- 
dustry. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



We have made many and mighty 
gains in the living and working stand- 
ards of the membership through united 
efforts, but these will be of no avail 
if the day comes when there are no 
jobs, no projects to be constructed 
with building trades craftsmen. 

The construction industry itself 
faces a serious challenge to its con- 
tinued independence and its capacity 
to serve the public. The contract 
method under which the country has 
been built to its present high state of 
development is being undermined by 
"do-it-yourself" construction on a 
grand scale. When the contract method 
goes, so go the construction contrac- 
tors and the flexible and mobile pool 
of highly skilled craftsmen. 

At various missile sites there has 
been a warning signal raised whereby 
huge production companies are mak- 
ing a determined drive to degrade the 
building operation normally performed 
by the construction industry to the 
status of a minor service which they, 
themselves, think can be done with 
little effort. The aircraft manufac- 
turers, faced with a disappearing 
market for militay aircrafts, now main- 
tain that they can be responsible for 
the production, construction and mod- 
ification of all facilities for use in 
the research, development and manu- 
facture of weapons, plus the alarm- 
ing argument that they can also design 
and construct the necessary launching 
sites, modify, maintain and service a 
building project. 

An additional threat on these missile 
project sites is the use of force ac- 
count and conscript labor (military 
personnel) and the repressive and in- 
equitable administrative procedures 
in the handling of contracts. The 
construction worker is faced with com- 
petition from so-called "technicians" 
and production workers and govern- 
ment-paid, on-the-site military men. 

We Must Unite 

The construction industry, in whole 
and in part, will have to unite to com- 
bat this threat, but the relatively new 
field of missile installations and the 
coming "Space Age" should and will, 
if we are successful, provide many 
heretofore unknown avenues of em- 
ployment for members of the organ- 
ized labor unions. 

Another immediate cause for alarm 
confronting us is the flight of many 
major American industries to foreign 
countries to take advantage of low 
wages, tariffs and taxes. This move- 
ment has accelerated to the extreme 
in the past twelve months, and this 
migration affects almost every key 




Second General Vice President William Blaier 



industry in this country as well as large 
and small communities which depend 
upon manufacturers for employment, 
wages, purchasing power and taxes. 
Besides causing a direct loss of jobs in 
the United States, these industrial 
exiles ship their low-cost products back 
to the United States under favorable 
tariffs to undersell the labor and prod- 
ucts of the stay-at-home workers and 
firms. 

These run-away manufacturers have 
located in England, France, Germany, 
Japan, Italy, Scotland, Switzerland and 
Brazil. In these foreign countries 
former "Made in America" products 
such as automobiles, tires, farm equip- 
ment, machine tools, business ma- 
chines, office furniture, kitchen equip- 
ment, toys, fountain pens, barbed wire 
and even the nails you pound in wood 
every day are produced for less and 
sell for less in your own stores. 

In addition to the adverse impact 
on employment, wages, jobs, purchas- 
ing power, savings and investments 
throughout the United States, this im- 



balance has meant a serious loss of 
Fort Knox gold, a lower value of the 
dollar abroad and a decline of interna- 
tional prestige. 

To give you a figure, it is estimated 
that at least two billion dollars' worth 
of a yearly total of imported manu- 
factured goods was produced in over- 
seas plants owned fully or partially by 
American interests. On this basis, it 
is estimated further that these Ameri- 
can-financed imports were responsible 
for the loss of between 500,000 and 
600,000 jobs in this country. In addi- 
tion to factory workers displaced by 
this unfair competition, the producers 
of raw materials, clerical help, truckers 
and those who would normally con- 
struct these plants were adversely af- 
fected. Taking into consideration the 
fact that we have a working force of 
65 million, the loss of 600,000 jobs 
might not seem disastrous, but its 
effects are far-reaching. An authority 
on finances, industrial trends, tariffs 
and taxes has shown that it deprives a 
single community of $300,000 in an- 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



29 



nual sales, $270,000 in bank deposits, 
107 automobile sales, the purchasing 
power of 112 households, 74 jobs in 
other industries and four retail estab- 
lishments. In addition to the fore- 
going, there is an appreciable loss in 
payments to Social Security, Unem- 
ployment Compensation, Health & 
Welfare funds, pension plans and Fed- 
eral, state and local taxes through the 
loss of employment hours being af- 
forded the American worker, which 
imposes an additional financial burden 
on the stay-at-home industrial and 
construction workers. 

America was responsible for the 
invention of the sewing machine, the 
modern typewriter, barbed wire and 
wire nails. With these products today, 
we are importing fifty times as much 
as we sent to other countries. Nails 
are a West Germany monopoly and 
can be sold at Cleveland for $40 a 
ton less than nails made in other Ohio 
cities. 

The American free enterprise sys- 
tem is in danger of being overwhelmed 
by the mounting weight of foreign 
competition. They can undersell us 
in foreign markets. How long can we 
survive, economically, if United States 
firms transfer more and more of their 
productive facilities overseas? 

To ease this problem of industrial 
migration, it is obvious that labor and 
management must cooperate. They 
must increase productivity without in- 
flating the cost of exportable products: 
if labor shows restraint with respect 
to wages, management must also ex- 
hibit a similar restraint with respect 
to profits. It would also follow that a 
boycott of these American-produced, 
foreign-imported products might pro- 
duce the desired results. 

You have been alerted to the threats 
on hand, and if they are conquered, I 
can give you a promise of bright 
horizons to come within a short period. 

We should see, within the next 
decade, the beginning of the greatest 
building project of all time. The addi- 
tional population expected will require 
millions of new dwelling units and 
provisions must be made for replace- 
ment of existing structures. Highway 
construction will be expanded far be- 
yond the present program as traffic 
grows. Everything you can name will 
have to keep up with population 
growth and technological change. 

In the construction field, our rate 
of replacement of existing houses in 
recent years has been extremely low. 
Despite some opinions to the contrary, 
it seems most likely that we have been 
underbuilding rather than overbuilding 
in relation to our housing needs. There 




A dramatic view in a diversion tunnel on one of the great reclamation projects 
of the West. Below is one of the major dams under construction. Carpenters have 
played an important role in the many projects which have marked the growth of 
Western reclamation. Construction has been basic to Western expansion. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



were high levels of construction in 
1959, but this represents catching up 
with the past rather than borrowing 
from the future. 

With the ever-increasing popularity 
of air travel and the need for expanded 
facilities to handle jet planes, airport 
construction will also move ahead. 

The market for construction ma- 
terials and services in 1960 alone will 
be among the very largest in history 
and the forerunner of even more pros- 
perous years ahead. 

Ours is an economy that thrives on 
expansion. Its possibilities are limitless 
if men are permitted to maintain the 
freedom to forge their own destinies 
as they always have, particularly if 
they retain the right to voluntarily 
join together in democratic societies 
for the purpose of making tomorrow 
better than today. How much of our 
progress stems from the existence of 
that right in years gone by cannot be 







:iflKj 


• -j- -J3H8I 



Public construction projects are 
sources of construction jobs. 

over-estimated. That we are in such 
a position is due largely to the never- 
'ending struggle of organized labor for 
constantly improving today and to- 
morrow. 

Therein lies the secret of a bound- 
less prosperity for years to come. 
More and more of the good things 
of life must be made available to more 
and more people. The luxuries of to- 
day are the necessities of tomorrow. 

The constant union pressure for 
better living standards makes way for 
a constant and prosperous growth for 
all American industry and a better 
way of life for all. Unions played a 
vital role in making today better than 
yesterday, and tomorrow can be made 
better than today if the threats outlined 
above are met courageously and with 
a determined effort on the part of all. 

From all that 1 have said I think 



it is obvious that the kind of growing 
economy we need and can have de- 
pends on forward looking administra- 
tions in Washington and Ottawa. We 
need men in high office who under- 
stand that no nation can grow and 
prosper unless its working popula- 
tion has the purchasing power to main- 
tain an expanding living standard. 



This is a simple statement but one 
that is the basic truth of all economics. 
Our challenge, then, is to increase 
our political effectiveness. This we can 
do only by devoting the same high 
degree of energy and dedication to 
political activity that we traditionally 
have devoted to matters concerning 
wages and working conditions. 



REGISTRATION DEADLINES FOR 1960 

Alabama Oct. 28 

Alaska No Reg. 

Arkansas No Reg. 

24 
15 
15 
8 
18 
5 
10 
10 

Iowa Oct. 29 

28 

18 

8 



Colorado Oct. 

Connecticut Oct. 

Delaware Oct. 

Florida Oct. 

Hawaii Oct. 

Idaho Nov. 

Illinois Oct. 

Indiana Oct. 



Kansas Oct. 

(Topeka, Kansas City and Wichita) Oct. 

Louisiana Oct. 

Maine Varies by city 

Massachusetts Oct. 7 

Michigan Oct. 10 

Minnesota Oct. 18 

Missouri Varies by county 

Nebraska Oct. 29 

(Lincoln and Omaha) Oct. 28 

Nevada Oct. 8 

New Hampshire Oct. 29 

(Variations) 

New Jersey Sept. 29 

New Mexico Oct. 8 

New York Oct. 15 

North Carolina Oct. 29 

North Dakota No Reg. 

Oklahoma Oct. 28 

Oregon Oct. 8 

South Carolina Oct. 8 

South Dakota Oct. 

Tennessee (larger counties) Oct. 

(smaller counties) Oct. 

Texas No Reg. 

Utah Nov. 2 

Vermont Nov. 

Virginia Oct. 

Washington Oct. 

West Virginia Oct. 

Wisconsin Oct. 

Wyoming Oct. 



31 
19 
29 



5 
8 
8 
8 
26 
24 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



31 




By Richard E. Livingston 

General Secretary 




brotherhood 
belongs 



in our 

name 



General Secretary Richard E. Livingston 



SOMEWHERE in the archives at 
the General Office there is a pic- 
ture of Peter J. McGuire, first General 
Secretary, sitting at a battered desk 
conducting the business of his office 
with a single hand. 

Some days, when the incoming mail 
is particularly heavy, I think of that 
picture and the tremendous changes 
that have taken place from his time 
to mine. The great satisfaction I get 
out of the situation is to realize that 
the United Brotherhood today is ful- 
filling most of the dreams that Peter 
J. McGuire dreamed when he spear- 
headed the drive to form our inter- 
national union. We have come a long 
way, indeed, since 1881. And we are 
going much farther. 

I have only been in office three 
years and I am frank to say they have 
been three years of constant learning. 
The task of maintaining records of an 
organization as large and as complex 
as ours is a challenging job, and the 
task has not been made any easier 
by passage of the Landrum-Griffin 
Bill, with all its demands for endless 
reports and complicated bonding pro- 
visions. But with the aid of a dedi- 
cated staff and the constant addition 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



of the latest in office equipment, I 
believe I can say, in all humility, the 
General Secretary's Department is 
being conducted with efficiency and 
faithfulness of purpose. Our constant 
aim is to do a better job. 

To emphasize the point that the 
office of General Secretary has in- 
creased tremendously in complexity 
and responsibility, I cite the fact that 
245,322 pieces of mail were received 
during the years of 1958 and 1959, 
and 47,260 letters were mailed from 
the office. This, I think, pinpoints our 
progress more effectively than any- 
thing I could say. 

In keeping with the growing com- 
plexity of the office, it has become 
necessary once more to update and 
modernize our financial and statistical 
accounting procedures. This, in itself, 
has posed a tremendous challenge. 

Until the year 1946, membership 
records were kept in longhand on 
handwritten cards. By 1946, the 
system became bogged down by the 
sheer weight of the workload. In 
that year the General Executive Board 
authorized, and General Secretary 
Fischer supervised, a complete 
modernization of our accounting 
procedures by the installation of an 
IBM system with punch cards and 
the quarterly account sheet. It was 
a tremendous step forward and in- 
volved a great deal of planning and 
coordinating. Thanks to the untiring 
effort of General Secretary Fischer 
and the fine cooperation of Local 
Unions, it became an unqualified 
success. 

Since that time it has served our 
organization well. But technology in 
accounting is advancing faster than 
practically any other field. Better ways 
of doing things are cropping up con- 
stantly. Therefore, a new system — 
arrived at as a result of a great deal of 
study and research — has been in- 
stituted to update our record-keeping 
procedures. 

Changes Approved 

In October, 1958, a national firm of 
accountants and auditors, after a 
survey of our present auditing and 
record-keeping system, reported to the 
General Executive Board and recom- 
mended certain changes to modernize 
our record-keeping, accounting con- 
trols and financial reporting activities. 
Their changes were approved by the 
General Executive Board with the 
objective that our activities be effec- 
tively and efficiently performed; that 
the financial reporting conform to 
generally accepted accounting princi- 
ples, and that the Brotherhood fully 
discharge its responsibility for financial 




PER CAPITA PAID 
TO AFFILIATED UNIONS 

BY YEAR OR 
CONVENTION PERIOD 



TOTAL $7,195,159.67 




R a 5 s s « 5 



$63.05 



e «t m o o m 

JC o-. o« o* o o 

g o oo r> c-j ■» o - « _ ■ ■ m 

— M IN r* rs *s is * _ ■ 




1666 '88 •90 12 '94 '96 '98 1 900 02 06 '08 '10 12 '14 '16 '20 '24 '28 '36 '40 '45 '49 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58. '59 



SOURCE OF INCOME 1958-1959 



OTHER SOURCES 

.88% 

SALE OF FRUIT 

4.07% 

SAIE OF REAL ESTATE 
2J9% 

INTEREST t DIVIDENDS 
2.60% 

PRINTING PLANT 

5.51% 

INITIATIONS 
4.46% 




SUMMARY 
80.09'. 



5.51% 



IHI'lltlO*! 

4.46% 



Uil or nun 
4.07% 



imtttlT I BmSIHBI 
2.60% 



emit louidi 
.88% 



reporting and control to its mem- 
bership. 

This has resulted in a complete new 
bookkeeping system, mechanized to 
conform with modern, up-to-date 
standards and a new billing system to 
all Local Unions, which will relieve 



the Financial Secretaries of the neces- 
sity of figuring the quarterly account 
sheets. 

A statement will be sent to each 
Local Union every month, detailing all 
transactions received by the General 
Office during the previous month. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



33 



This statement will show the net 
amount due the General Office as of 
the end of the month, the name of 
each Local Union member involved 
in an activity changing his status as 
a paid-up member of the Local Union, 
together with the charge or credit 
caused by that activity. Their activity 
charges will be added to (or subtracted 
from) the per capita tax amount which 
would ordinarily be due on the basis 
of the Local Union's membership 
count at the end of the previous 
month. For example: 

If your Local Union had ten bene- 
ficial members at the end of one 
month, the tax would be 10 x $1.50 
or $15.00. If three new members were 
initiated during the following month, 
and the General Office received their 
applications, each new member would 
be listed on your statement along with 
the tax and fee amounts due. In this 
case, the total tax due would be $1 5.00 
plus 3 x $1.50 or $19.50. The semi- 
beneficial Local Union per capita tax 
rate would be $0.60 instead of $1.50. 
The initiation fees would be listed in 
a separate column and included in the 
total amount due. 

New System Helpful 

Under the new system it will no 
longer be necessary for the Local 
secretary to enter the dollar amounts 
of per capita tax and fees for mem- 
bers in good standing on the quarterly 
account sheets. These amounts will 
be developed mechanically by the 
equipment at the General Office. 
Remittances received from Local 
Unions during the month will be sub- 
tracted from the total charged against 
the Local Union, to arrive at the net 
amount due the General Office at the 
end of the month. Any items re- 
ceived after the end of the month will 
be included in the next month's state- 
ment. 

Each Local Union will receive two 
copies of its monthly statement. One 
copy, marked "Return with Remit- 
tances," is to be mailed to the General 
Office with the check for the exact 
amount shown in the box marked 
"Amount Due This Month." The 
other copy is to be retained by the 
Local Union for its own checking 
purposes. 

The advantages of the new system 
will be many. First, it will be possible 
for the General Office to keep ac- 
counts with Local Unions on a current 
month by month basis. Second, the 
load of the financial secretary will be 
reduced considerably, since he will 
not be required to do as much writing. 



YEAR 

1886 
1888 
1890 
1892 
1894 
1896 
1898 
1900 
1902 
1 904 lo 1 906 

1906 to 1908 



1908 to 1910 



1910to 1912 



191 2 to 1914 



1914to 1916 



YEAR 

1916to 1920 



1920 to 1924 



1924 to 1928 



1928 to 1936 



1936 to 1940 



PER CAPITA TAX — 1881-1959 
TO AFFILIATES 

AMOUNT OF 
AFFILIATE TAX PAID 

Federation of Trades $ 63.05 

A. F. of L 1 ,099.70 

A. F. of L . 2,058.94 

A. F. of L 2,834.95 

A. F. of L 2,779.90 

A. F. ofL 2,267.00 

A. F. of 1 2,422.03 

A. F. of L 2,000.02 

A. F. of L 4,733,33 

A. F. of L 17,275.92 

Structural Building Trades Alliance 7,578.24 

A. F. of L 22,377.90 

A. F. of L. Assessment 4,020.00 

Building Trades Dept 10,747.25 

Canadian Labor Congress 1,041.00 

A. F. of L 20,593.70 

A. F. of L. Assessment 8,494.00 

Building Trades Dept 9,829.10 

Building Trades Assessment 3,457.80 

Canadian Labor Congress 1,548.15 

A. F. of L 24,537.67 

Building Trades Dept 4,417.50 

Canadian Labor Congress 2,050.65 

A. F. of L 33,358.83 

A. F. of L. Assessment 4,308.00 

Building Trades Dept 13,411.70 

Canadian Labor Congress 3,013.38 

A. F. ofL 32,393.24 

A. F. of L. Assessment 4,045.00 

Building Trades Dept 3,228.68 

Canadian Labor Congress 2,088.36 



AMOUNT OF 
AFFILIATE TAX PAID 

A. F. of I $ 118,400.58 

A. F. of L. Special Assessment 3,120.51 

Building Trades Dept ' 45,671.20 

Union Label Trades 1 ,451 .00 

Canadian Labor Congress 6,831.35 

A. F. ofL 151,908.17 

Building Trades Dept 1 1,738.25 

Canadian Labor Trades 7,973.13 

Union Label Trades Dept 5,775.00 

A. F. of L 1 56,690.00 

Building Trades Dept 18,000.00 

Union Label Trades Dept 6,1 25.00 

Canadian Labor Congress 5,215.02 

International Wood Workers 5,000.00 

A. F. of L 255,430.00 

Building Trades Dept 60,187.50 

Canadian Labor Congress 8,021.39 

Union Label Trades Dept 8,325.00 

International Wood Workers 7,500.00 

Amalgamated Builders Council 43.70 

A. F. of L 144,000.00 

A. F. of L. Special Assessment 102,000.00 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



1940 to 1945 



1946 to 1949 



YEAR 

1 950 to 1 953 



1954 



1955 



1956 



1957 



1958 



YEAR 

1959 



Building Trades Dept 54,000.00 

Canadian Labor Congress 3,419.10 

Union Label Trades 2,400.00 

A. F. of L 425,000.00 

A. F. of L. Special Assessment 18,000.00 

Building Trades Dept 11 7,750.00 

Canadian Labor Congress 11 ,263.50 

Union Label Trades Dept 4,016.82 

International Labor Press 24.00 

A. F. of L 621 ,000.00 

Building Trades Dept 108,000.00 

Canadian Labor Congress 17,750.00 

Union Label Trades Dept 3,533.46 

Allied Organizations 2,565.00 



AMOUNT OF 

AFFILIATE TAX PAID 

(CONVENTION) 

A. F. of L $1,080,000.00 

Building Trades 1 12,500.00 

A. F. of L. Labor League for Political Education 20,000.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 37,750.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 5,600.00 

International Labor Press 96.00 

A. F. of L 360,000.00 

Building and Construction Trades 27,000.00 

Union label and Service Trades 2,250.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 16,800.00 

A. F. of L 360,000.00 

Building and Construction Trades 27,000.00 

Industrial Union Dept 7,000.00 

Metal Trades Dept 600.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 3,600.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 19,200.00 

A. F. of L 360,000.00 

A. F. of L. Assessment 37,500.00 

Building and Construction Trades 36,000.00 

Building Trades Co-ordinating Committee Fund 10,000.00 

Industrial Union Dept 84,000.00 

Metal Trades Dept 3,600.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 3,600.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 28,800.00 

A. F. of L 360,000.00 

A. F. of L. Assessment 97,500.00 

Building and Construction Trades 48,000.00 

Industrial Union Dept 56,000.00 

Metal Trades Dept 3,600.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 3,600.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 33,600.00 

A. F. of L 412,500.00 

Building and Construction Trades 72,000.00 

Maritime Trades Dept 2,200.00 

Metal Trades Dept 3,600.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 3,600.00 

Union Label Trades Dept. of C.L.C. Canada 400.00 

Canadian Trades and Labor Congress 33,600.00 

Government Employees Council of AFL-CIO 480.00 

AMOUNT OF 

AFFILIATE TAX PAID 

A. F. of L $ 487,500.00 

A. F. of L. 6-month Assessment 45,000.00 

Building and Construction Trades 72,000.00 

Maritime Trade Dept 2,400.00 

Metal Trades Dept 3,600.00 

Union Label and Service Trades 3,600.00 

Union Label Trades Dept. of C.L.C. Canada 1,200.00 

Labor Congress 33,600.00 

Government Employees Council of AFL-CIO 480.00 



When all the "bugs" are ironed out, 
both the General Office and the Local 
Union will have a better and more 
up-to-date record of membership 
status. 

Changing over to the new system 
may involve some problems of adjust- 
ment for the financial secretary. But 
with patience and willingness to adapt, 
there are none that cannot be solved. 
Cooperation is the essential ingredient. 
For my own part, I pledge that the 
General Secretary's office will do 
everything in its power to assist finan- 
cial secretaries in familiarizing them- 
selves with the new system, and I 
sincerely hope that the Local Unions 
will cooperate in making the necessary 
changes as smoothly as possible. 

It is my desire and the aim of the 
General Secretary's Department that 
by the use of the revised accounting 
procedures, through mechanization 
and modernization, we will be of even 
more service to the members of the 
United Brotherhood. 

New Legal Obligations 

The passage of the Landrum-Griffin 
Bill has added new responsibilities to 
the General Secretary's Department — 
the filing of LM-1-2-3 forms, termina- 
tion reports upon the disbanding or 
consolidation of Local Unions, and 
the bonding provisions contained in 
Section 502 of the Act, of which you 
have been notified in Current Informa- 
tion Bulletins No. 106 and 109. The 
bonding arrangement was accom- 
plished only after endless hours of 
negotiations with the surety company, 
but misinterpretation and reinterpreta- 
tion by the Department of Labor 
caused endless confusion. However, 
by diligent effort on the part of Gen- 
eral President M. A. Hutcheson and 
your officers, this has resulted in a 
bonding procedure that will save the 
Local Unions, District and State Coun- 
cils thousands of dollars. Also, we 
were able through a Canadian surety 
company to pass this saving on to our 
Canadian Local Unions, District and 
Provincial Councils, providing only a 
minimum bond with the privilege of 
increasing same if they so desired. 

The office of General Secretary is 
further complicated by the pending 
move to Washington. There are 
truckloads of records that must be 
moved, and the moving must be done 
in such a way as to preclude any 
suspension of services. This involves 
a great deal of pre-planning; and the 
department has already make a signif- 
icant start in this direction. 

At the time the actual move is made, 
the cooperation of Local Unions and 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



35 



Councils will again be necessary. The 
way things are now planned, there 
should be no interruption of mail 
service. But in the event that hitches 
do develop, I hope that all subordinate 
bodies will maintain a patient attitude 
and tender the high degree of coopera- 
tion we have always received in the 
past. 

All in all, I am sure that once the 
new accounting procedure has been 
firmly established and our head- 
quarters have been moved to Wash- 
ington, that we will be in a position 
to serve our Local Unions and 
Councils at the highest possible level 
of efficiency. 

Union Held Ifs Own 

In this era of widespread unemploy- 
ment in depressed areas, and constant 
shrinking of jobs through automatic 
machinery, many international unions 
are losing ground steadily. I am happy 
to say that our Brotherhood more 
than held its own during 1959. Dur- 
ing the year we initiated 97,065 new 
members. However, 89,874 members 
were suspended during the same 
period — largely for non-payment of 
dues. I think it is very much to the 
credit of our Local Unions, Councils, 
and organizing staff that nearly 
100,000 men were initiated last year. 
Unfortunately, drop-outs came within 
a few thousand of balancing out 
initiations. But this is something over 
which we have very little control. In 
this day of swiftly changing tech- 
nology, people are constantly on the 
move. 

As of December 31, 1959, our 
Brotherhood was made up of 2,899 
Local Unions with a total membership 
of 806,640. Total income for 1959 
exceeded $13,000,000. 

Presented herewith are charts that 
should be of considerable interest to 
our members since they present a gen- 
eral picture of our operations for the 
years 1958 and 1959. 

The first chart analyzes our receipts 
for the years 1958-1959 by source of 
revenue. As the chart indicates, the 
vast bulk of our income is derived 
from per capita tax. 

The second chart breaks down the 
distribution of income. It is interesting 
to note that 53.50% of our income 
is earmarked to go back to members 
directly in the form of death and 
disability donations, pensions, and 
maintenance of the Home for Aged 
Members. I think this dramatically 
emphasizes the fact that the word 
"brotherhood" belongs in our name, 
because the benefits paid represent a 



DISTRIBUTION OF INCOME 1958-1959 




UNEXPENDED RECEIPTS 

1.92% 

STRIKE DONATION 



AFFILIATES 
4.17% 



real helping hand to members who 
have suffered a tragedy through death 
or disability, or have become too old 
to work. 

I think it is also of interest to note 
that 4.17% of our income was de- 
voted to maintaining our affiliations 
with other organizations, namely, the 
AFL-CIO, Building Trades, Metal 
Trades, Union Label Trades, etc. The 
labor movement is fighting many bat- 
tles on many fronts. This makes neces- 
sary the maintenance of numerous or- 



ganizations and departments with 
specialized responsibilities. The fact 
that we contributed over $640,000 
last year to support these organiza- 
tions certainly indicates that we are 
doing our part all the way along the 
line. 

From these charts it is obvious that 
our Brotherhood has maintained a 
high level of service to its members. 
It has been a great privilege to be a 
member of the team which made it 
all possible. 



Providence Local Has New Headquarters Building 




L.U. 94, Providence, R. I., is completing construction of a new union building. 
The above illustration is an architect's drawing of the new building scheduled for 
completion and dedication sometime this month. 



When completed it will be one of 
the showplaces of the city. It is the 
fulfillment of a long-cherished dream 
of the officers and members of Local 
Union No. 94. 

As the photograph shows, the new 
headquarters of the Providence Local 
is as modern as tomorrow. It will 
provide a meeting hall large enough to 
accommodate all of the Local's needs, 



plus ample office space for carrying 
on all necessary business. It is de- 
signed primarily to fit the special needs 
of the organization. 

Parking space, too, is provided for 
in sufficient quantity to meet all ordi- 
nary demands. Members and officers 
alike are looking forward to the day 
the union takes up residence in its 
new headquarters. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis. Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. Hutcheson 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Frank Chapman 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 

3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14. Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd.. S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District. J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd.. San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson. Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



The Constitution and Laws of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America spell out in detail the responsibilities 
of the Member, the Financial Secretary, and 
the General Secretary regarding a member's 
dues. Every member should understand these 
provisions thoroughly, since it is his member- 
ship, his right to benefits, and his union record 
that are at stake when dues are not kept paid 



in accordance with the Constitutional terms 
laid down by successive conventions. 

Dues are a prime obligation of union mem- 
bership. The ultimate responsibility for keep- 
ing dues properly paid — and thereby remain- 
ing in benefit standing — rests with the individ- 
ual member. The initiative must come from 
him. Let us keep our dues paid up properly 
and thereby avoid misunderstandings and the 
risk of arrearage and suspension. 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



37 







strong! 

HANDS 
HELM 




GENERAL OFFICERS 





JOHN R. STEVENSON 
First General Vice President 

R. E. LIVINGSTON 
General Secretary 



O. WILLIAM BLAIER 
Second Genera/ Vice President 

FRANK CHAPMAN 
Genera/ Treasurer 







CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
First District 

RALEIGH RAJOPPI 
Second District 




GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 




HARRY SCHWARZER 


HENERY W. CHANDLER 


LEON W. GREENE 


J. O. MACK 


Third District 


Fourth District 


Fifth District 


Sixth District 


LYLE J. HILLER 


J. F. CAMBIANO 


ANDREW V. COOPER 


GEORGE BENGOUGH 


Seventh District 


Eighth District 


Ninth District 


Tenth District 




m 







^tfJiB***' 



Vol*'* 15 i- 

si 



I 



-ft"' 1 






»T. 



1J»l»* 



».o* 



V»»\ 



ISSUE COVERSisTt. 

wis 8 * 

1885-1955 



•"•ST** 

'l^** — "I 




ADOPTS NEW DRESS 

THE JOURNAL MODERNIZES FOR 
TIME IN 81 YEARS OF PUBLICATION 



AT a rough estimate, THE CAR- 
PENTER, over the past 80 years, 
probably has published 10.000 articles 
dealing with the problems of the 
working man — particularly on the 
need for maintaining strong, dedicated 
unions. Yet it is doubtful if a single 
article appearing in the magazine car- 
ried more impact or stated the case 
for militant unionism stronger than 
one that appeared in the very first 
issue. The title of this particular article 
was "Organize A National Union." 

Written by the immortal Peter J. 
McGuire. the recognized founder of 
our Brotherhood, the article set forth 
the need for establishing a national 
union to tie together the independent 
and scattered local =un ions of carpen- 
ters that existed at the time (1881). 
Probably this article had more to do 
with inspiring 14 of these unions to 
send delegates to the founding con- 
vention than any other one thing. In 
his plea for unity and singleness of 
purpose. Brother McGuire said: 

"In the present age there is no hope 
for -workingmen outside of organiza- 
tion. Without a trades union, the work- 
man meets the employer at a great 
disadvantage. The capitalist has the 
advantage of past accumulations; the 
laborer, unassisted by combination, 
has not. Knowing this, the capitalist 
can wait, while his men. without 
funds, have no other alternative but 
to submit. But with organization the 
case is altered; and the more wide- 
spread the organization, the better. 
Then the workman is able to meet the 
employer on equal terms. No longer 



8®"5$£5l 




helpless and without resources, he has 
not only his union treasury, but the 
moneys of sister unions to support 
him in his demands. 

"The learned professions have their 
unions, for the avowed purpose of 
elevating their calling. Manufacturers 
have also discovered the benefits of 
united, in place of divided, action, and 
they have numberless unions, local 
and national. In various cities we find 
mechanics' exchanges composed of 
boss builders. They look to each 
other's common interests. Shall we 
not profit by these lessons? If the 
strong combine, why should not the 
weak?" 

How could the case for militant 
unionism be stated more eloquently 
or more effectively? The whole es- 
sence of union philosophy is embodied 
in the above paragraphs. And the 
words are as true and as meaningful 
today as they were in 1881 when they 
were written. 

THE CARPENTER was born in 
St. Louis in May of 1881. It was the 
brainchild of Peter J. McGuire who 
recognized that a medium of commu- 
nication was needed to inform and 
educate the officers and members of 
the scattered independent unions be- 
fore a successful national organization 
could be established. Several previous 
efforts to form a national union failed 
because there was no means of keep- 
ing affiliated unions adequately posted. 
Brother McGuire made up his mind 
that the new national union he 
dreamed of would not suffer from 
this shortcoming. So in May of 1881 



IBBBBWED"^ " ' 



CARPENTER 




jc^ 



iVRPEXTER 




.zn 



MPENTER 






the first issue of THE CARPENTER 
rolled off the presses. 

From May to August the publica- 
tion concentrated on developing the 
reasons why a strong national union 
was needed. When the founding con- 
vention was called to order in Chicago 
on August 10, 1881, 36 delegates 
representing 14 independent unions in 
11 cities were on hand in answer to 
Brother McGuire's persistent pleas for 
national organization. 

Priority Attention 

The rest is history. The 36 dele- 
gates instituted the Brotherhood of 
Carpenters which eventually became 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. One of their 
first actions was to make THE CAR- 
PENTER the official publication of 
the new organization. In all the years 
since, THE CARPENTER has been 
keeping members posted regarding 
union affairs. It has fought the battle 
of Brotherhood members on the 
political as well as the economic front. 
Today it is striving to perpetuate and 
enhance the principles of unionism 
laid down by Peter J. McGuire. 

In the beginning, THE CARPEN- 
TER was really a tab-sized newspaper. 
It contained eight pages. Most of the 
material summarized the organizing 
efforts which were being carried on 
from border to border and coast to 
coast. The whole heroic effort of the 
carpenters of the 1880's to organize 
an effective and permanent national 
union is contained in these first issues 
of the magazine. 

For the first 7 months THE CAR- 
PENTER was published out of the 
provisional headquarters of the union 
in St. Louis. But in December of 
1881 the General Office moved to 
New York, and the publication moved 
with the office. The General Office 
was located at 184 Williams Street, 
New York City. 

Apparently it stayed in New York 
until the year 1884. The November 
issue of that year carried a notice an- 
nouncing that the Brotherhood head- 
quarters had been moved to Cleve- 
land. The only address given was 
"Lock Box 180, Cleveland." For some 
three years THE CARPENTER was 
printed in the Ohio Metropolis, for 
the January, 1887, issue carried an 
announcement that Brotherhood head- 
quarters had been moved to 476 
North Sixth Street, Philadelphia. 

The following year, the masthead of 
THE CARPENTER listed the head- 
quarters address as "124 North Ninth 



Street, Philadelphia." This was in the 
October, 1888, issue. 

Eleven years later, the organization 
moved to still another address in 
Philadelphia. The May, 1899, issue 
listed the "Lippincott Building, 46 
North Twelfth Street" as the official 
address of our Brotherhood. 

A few years later, the Atlantic City 
Convention voted to move the head- 
quarters to Indianapolis, Indiana. In 
January of 1903, the move was made 
to Indianapolis, the population center 
of the nation at the time. The organi- 
zation set up shop on the fifth floor of 
the Stevenson Building. The next year 
(1904) our Brotherhood changed its 
address without moving, inasmuch as 
the name of the Stevenson Building 
was changed to the State Life Building. 

By now our Brotherhood was 
determined to have a headquarters 
building of its own. The next con- 
vention authorized the officers to in- 
vestigate the feasibility of buying 
ground and erecting a building in 
Indianapolis. After a good deal of 
study, the officers determined that the 
property at 222 East Michigan Street 
was ideal for the organization's pur- 
pose. During the next five years the 
site was purchased and the contract 
for the building let. 

Move fo Indianapolis 

In May of 1909, our Brotherhood 
officially moved into its present head- 
quarters at 222 East Michigan Street, 
Indianapolis. 

For the first dozen years the print- 
ing of THE CARPENTER was farm- 
ed out to an Indianapolis firm. But 
the Brotherhood determined that it 
could do its own printing more 
cheaply. By action of the 18th 
General Convention, the officers were 
authorized to establish a printing plant 
of our own. A separate building was 
erected behind the headquarters build- 
ing in Indianapolis, and in the year 
1915 the Carpenters Printing Plant 
went into operation. In the 45 years 
since, the magazine has been printed 
in our own plant. 

Over the years the nature of THE 
CARPENTER has changed consider- 
ably. From 1881 until 1890 the pub- 
lication operated as an eight-page 
newspaper. During the 1890's it went 
to 16 pages. Then in February, 1905, 
it was changed to magazine format, a 
form it has maintained ever since. 

Now the magazine is to move once 
more — this time to the Capital of the 
United States. Beginning with the 
January, 1960, issue, THE CARPEN- 



TER will adopt the size and dress of 
this special convention issue. 

Once more the printing of the 
magazine will be contracted out to a 
commercial firm. The vast techno- 
logical changes in the printing industry 
make it impractical for a single or- 
ganization to invest in a modern high- 
speed plant. A high-speed press that 
can do color work costs the better part 
of a million dollars. But such a press 
is so efficient it could run off our pub- 
lication in a single week. This would 
mean a very expensive piece of equip- 
ment sitting idle three-fourths of the 
time. 

After giving the matter a great deal 
of study, the General Executive Board 
decided that the printing of the maga- 
zine should be farmed out. A large 
number of printing establishments 
were invited to submit preliminary 
bids. When the bids were all in, it 
was found some half-dozen bidders 
were qualified. These were invited to 
submit detailed bids. After careful 
scrutiny, the contract was awarded to 
Merkle Press, one of the biggest 
printers in Washington, already print- 
ing a great many labor publications. 

This special issue is a sample of 
what the new magazine will look like 
next year. More departments — includ- 
ing a Canadian section — more pic- 
tures, more art work, more features, 
and more color will be included in 
the new format. Every effort will be 
made to transform THE CARPEN- 
TER into a model publication for the 
whole labor press. 

Gels Some Allocation 

Oddly enough, THE CARPENTER 

still receives the same allocation of 
per capita tax today that it received 
45 years ago. Away back in 1915 the 
Brotherhood decided that five cents 
of the per capita tax should go toward 
publishing THE CARPENTER. That 
figure has never been changed, despite 
the fact printing costs have multiplied 
many times over in the intervening 
years. Five cents per month scarcely 
seems logical under the circumstances, 
especially since the new magazine will 
be bigger, fancier, and filled with ad- 
ditional features. 

Operating from our fine new head- 
quarters building in Washington, and 
printing in a very modern printing 
plant, THE CARPENTER next year 
is stepping into a new era of impor- 
tance and service to Brotherhood 
members. An organization with a 
history as proud as ours deserves a 
publication of which it can be proud. 



42 



THE CARPENTER 




JOBLESSNESS NO. 1 CANADIAN PROBLEM 




THE Carpenters Union in Canada 
continues to show progress in a 
number of important directions but 
the present situation is not unclouded. 
Organized drives are making good 
headway, health and welfare plans are 
being slowly but surely incorporated 
in the Brotherhood's agreements, an 
imaginative and concentrated drive to 
organize immigrant workers in the 
metropolitan Toronto area is succeed- 
ing. But the overall picture is over- 
shadowed by heavy unemployment 
from coast to coast. 

"There is a lot of unemployment on 
the west coast," according to E. T. 
Staley, Secretary of the B. C. Provin- 



cial Council, "In fact this is the worst 
I've known since I joined the Carpen- 
ters in this province in 1946." 

Brother Staley is a member of Local 
1598, Victoria, and held office in that 
local, first as financial secretary and 
then as president, for a period of ten 
years until his other duties in the 
union forced him to relinquish local 
office. He is now first vice-president 
of the Victoria Labour Council and a 
member of the executive council of 
the B.C. Federation of Labour as well 
as executive secretary of the B. C. 
Carpenters' Council. 

President of the B. C. Provincial 
Council is Howard Taft who used to 



be business agent of Local 1251, New 
Westminster. He is also financial 
secretary of the Vancouver Building 
Trades Council. Vice-president of the 
Provincial Council is Jack Mobley, 
one of the veterans of trade union 
activity in the province. The Council 
is holding its 18th annual convention 
in Vancouver, October 17, 18 and 19th 
and Brother Mobley will be attending 
for the 18th time. 

The B. C. Provincial Council is, 
of course, part of the new all-Cana- 
dian District Ten under guidance of 
George Bengough, formerly business 
agent of Vancouver Local 452, past 
president of the Council, and formerly 



These two photographs are from unemployment protest meet- 
ings held recently in British Columbia. Construction trades 
were hit in the economic decline. Note Carpenter sign at right. 









NOT 
CHAO 

At left is a breadline in Vancouver, B.C. at a religious mis- 
sion where the jobless are being given food. Above the un- 
employed display some of the banners used at a protest 
meeting. 



special representative appointed in 
1946. He was elected executive board 
member at the last general conven- 
tion. 

Brother Staley points with some 
pride to the fact that a leader of the 
official opposition party in the B. C. 
Legislature is a carpenter, Robert Stra- 
chan. Brother Strachan, a member of 
Local 527, Nanaimo, led his party in 
a provincial election fight in that prov- 
ince September 12th. 

The B. C. Council represents about 
9000 members and a good third of 
this number are jobless. 

The employment situation in other 
parts of the country is no better, ac- 
cording to William Stefanovitch, re- 
gional director of organization for On- 
tario. Almost every local in the region 
has reported heavy unemployment. 
Windsor has about 300 out of work in 
a membership of 800; Port Arthur 
reported almost 500 jobless out of 
1500 members; Toronto has 800 out 
of work in a total membership of just 
under 3,000; Hamilton 200 unem- 
ployed out of a thousand membership 
total. Ottawa is not the worst of the 
areas hit but Kingston, London, Chat- 
ham and other centres all reported 
high unemployment levels. 

Brightening this gloomy picture 
somewhat is the progress being made 
in unorganized areas including north- 
ern Manitoba and Quebec. The re- 
cently-instituted drive in Manitoba has 
already resulted in a certification at 
the big Abitibi Pulp and Paper Com- 
pany in Pine Falls. The Manitoba 
Labour Relations Board recognized a 
unit of 550 members. 

The Ontario region has been assist- 
ing the Manitoba area in their drive. 

In Quebec an effective job is being 
done at Sept Isles and the North 
Shore mining and industrial develop- 
ments, hundreds of miles east of 
Montreal. The campaign in this area 
is under the direction of the Quebec 
international representative, Edward 

44 



Larose. One of the chief obstacles to 
successful organizing in this province 
is the archaic labour laws. Brother 
Larose is first vice-president of the 
Quebec Federation of Labour. 

The annual convention of the Que- 
bec Council was held in July. It had 
a record attendance. 

Bill Stefanovitch is working out of 
his new office on Toronto's Melinda 
Street, the first regional office estab- 
lished in Canada. The thirty-six-year- 
old union leader got his start in Local 
494 Windsor, where he was secretary 
of the Building Trades Council. Ap- 
pointed business agent in 1951, he 
became vice-president of the Ontario 



Provincial Council of Carpenters in 
1952, international representative in 
1954 and regional director in 1957. 
He is chairman of the Provincial Mill- 
wrights Negotiating Committee. 

The organizing effort in Ontario has 
been instrumental in achieving the re- 
markable figure of one-fifth of all cer- 
tifications coming before the Ontario 
Labour Relations Board in the past 
three years. An immediate objective 
is a province-wide agreement for pile- 
drivers. The province-wide agreement 
for millwrights has been in effect for 
three years. 

(Continued on page 46) 



One of the Parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canadian capital. 








BtotyetBaftk 



Only the battle of the budget prob- 
ably rivals the cold war in intensity 
and duration. The working man's 
wife who does not have to plan, 
scheme, and improvise in order to 
make the OPC (old pay check) go all 
the way round is a rarity. 

In this new section of THE CAR- 
PENTER we will feature recipes that 
are long on nutrition but easy on 
butter, eggs, and other expensive in- 
gredients. Those who are interested in 
recipes for fixing truffles, partridge 
breasts, and sturgeon eggs can consult 
the slick women's magazines. Those 
who want to feed their families good, 
wholesome and tasty food at a rock- 
bottom price would do well to follow 
these pages. 

In addition to low-cost recipes, we 
will publish shopping tips, tips on 
evaluating materials, patterns that 
combine simplicity with smartness, 
and any other items that can add 
some muscle to the OPC. 

In these days of greatly inflated 
food costs, it is not only prudent but 
necessary to plan meals with an eye 
toward using economy foods that are 
high in nutrition. 

High on the list of these foods are 
potatoes which contain as much as 
one-fourth of your vitamin C quota, 
iron and other important minerals and 
starch. Penny for penny they have 



more energy-giving value than any 
other vegetable. And they need not 
be fattening. One medium-sized po- 
tato has about 100 calories, no more 
than an apple or banana. It's the 
gravy, butter or other fat that piles on 
the calories. 

Best way to get the most food value 
from potatoes is to cook them in their 
jackets. And of the two ways of 
cooking potatoes in their jackets, boil- 
ing conserves more vitamins than bak- 
ing. So start with potatoes boiled in 
their jackets whether you're serving 
them parslied, mashed, creamed, hash- 
browned or in salad. When raw po- 
tatoes are called for, peel the potatoes 
(keep those peelings thin) just before 
you cook them. Don't let them soak. 
If you must peel them ahead of time, 
put them in salted water. 

Quick-cooked and steaming hot is 
the best way to serve all potatoes, for 
the longer they stand exposed to the 
air, the more vitamin C they lose. 
Keep leftovers covered and store in 
a cold place. 



Potato Pancakes 

Grate 2 cups raw potatoes and mix 
immediately with Va cup milk. Add 1 
egg, beaten slightly, 2 tablespoons 
flour, 1 teaspoon salt, pepper, and 1 
tablespoon finely chopped onion. Drop 



45 



from a tablespoon onto a greased fry- 
ing pan. Cook until well browned and 
crisp on both sides. Serve hot. 

Cheese is so popular that a cook 
can be pretty sure of a welcome for 
a dish that features it. More than a 
billion pounds of cheese are produced 
in this country every year and about 
three-fourths of this is Cheddar or 
American cheese. 

Cheddar cheese, made from sweet 
whole milk, contains in concentrated 
form the many different nutrients that 
whole milk provides. To single out 
three: Milk is our leading source of 
calcium, one of the chief minerals 
needed for good bones and teeth. One 
ounce and a half of Cheddar cheese 
has as much calcium as a cup of milk. 
Cheddar cheese contains almost all 
the protein of milk — which is high 
quality protein like that in meat, fish, 
poultry and eggs. And it contains 
worth-while amounts of the B vitamin 
riboflavin, which is sometimes short in 
the foods families choose. 

Rice, like other cereals, supplies 
food energy at relatively low cost. 
White rice (the kind that has had all 
the outer layers removed and hasn't 
been treated to retain the vitamins) 
is low in protein, although that which 
it contains is of good quality. It is 
also low in minerals and vitamins. So 
when you use white rice, be sure to 
serve it with foods that supply the 
nutritive values rice lacks — with eggs, 
meat, fish, poultry, milk or cheese to 
supply good quality protein, and vita- 
mins and minerals; with vegetables, es- 
pecially green and yellow kinds, to 
provide minerals and vitamins, or with 
fruit, fresh or dried, cooked or raw, 
also for vitamins and minerals. 

Baked Fish in Cheese Sauce 

2 tablespoons butter or margarine 

3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 
% teaspoons salt 

V& teaspoon nutmeg 

Vi teaspoon powdered dry mustard 

1 cup hot milk 

% teaspoon lemon juice 
Vz cup shredded cheese 

2 pounds fish fillets (haddock, perch, 

flounder or sole) 
Melt the fat and blend in flour, salt, 
nutmeg, and mustard. Stir in the 
milk; cook until thickened, stirring 
constantly. Add lemon juice and 
cheese. Stir until cheese is melted. 

Place fish fillets in greased baking 
pan or casserole. Cover with cheese 
sauce. Bake at 375 degrees F. (mod- 
erate oven) for 45 minutes. Six serv- 
ings. 



Canada 

(Continued from page 44) 

In the last few months the most in- 
teresting development has been the 
drive to organize the immigrant con- 
struction workers in the Metropolitan 
Toronto area. This area is the fastest 
growing on the North American con- 
tinent. A quarter of all immigrants 
into Canada in recent years have 
settled in Toronto and vicinity. In- 
dustrial, commercial and residential 
construction has been operating at a 
very high rate. Most of industrial and 
commercial building has been done 
under union conditions, but home 
building has been in a most chaotic 
state with contractors and subcon- 
tractors cutting rates at the expense of 
the building trades. The big majority 
of these workers have been recent im- 
migrants, chiefly Italian, working up 
to 12 hours a day six days a week at 
less than half the union scale. 

Four unions, the bricklayers, 
laborers, plasters and carpenters, 
banded together as a special unit and 
led the organizational drive to get 
these exploited workers into union 
ranks. A city wide strike tied up 
about $70 million in residential con- 
struction long enough to squeeze out 
agreements which for the first time 
provide some protection for this 
grossly abused immigrant group. The 
Carpenters agreement calls for $2.50 
an hour effective October 1st, $2.70 
effective April 1st, 1961 and $2.90 
lune 1st. The one-year agreement 
which ends August 10th, 1961, pro- 
vides 4% vacation pay, time and a 



half for overtime, double time Satur- 
day, Sunday and statutory holidays. 
The closed shop and union security 
are also included, plus ten-minute 
coffee breaks morning and afternoon. 

About 900 workers have been 
signed into the newly-established 
Local 1190 of the Carpenters set up 
for the purpose of participating in the 
Toronto drive. 

"The enthusiasm shown by the im- 
migrant workers and others on this 
residential job proves without doubt 
that the period of the worst exploita- 
tion is over," according to Bill Stefan- 
ovitch. 

The other interesting item is the 
extension of health and medical serv- 
ice plans in various locals. Two floor- 
layers locals in B. C. (2527 Victoria 
and 1541 Vancouver) and two mill- 
workers locals (1928 and 2534 Van- 
couver) have medical plans to which 
the employers contribute seven cents 
an hour. In addition these provide 
$2000 insurance coverage and weekly 
indemnity of $25.00. 

The Hamilton Local 18 is in proc- 
ess of discussing a medical plan 
which they hope will prove to be a 
major breakthrough in the construc- 
tion industry in this part of Ontario. 
Sarnia Local 1256 already has a medi- 
cal care plan paid for by a 10 cent an 
hour contribution by employers. 

All in all the story across the coun- 
try is of the growing strength and 
stability of the Carpenters Union in 
Canada, clouded only by the abnormal 
level of unemployment which is affect- 
ing almost every industry in every 
part of the country. 



Chicago 

(Continued from page 11) 

pliances, chemicals, petroleum, pub- 
lishing, clothing, farm equipment, 
furniture, construction materials and 
a host of other items of modern life. 

Chicago is a city which enjoys life. 
Creative artists in many areas have 
given the world new elements in music 
— the Chicago school of jazz has made 
its mark — innovations in the theater, 
radio and television, writing, architec- 
ture, design. The city is a great sports 
center and the municipal authorities 
have developed parks, playgrounds 
and indoor and outdoor auditoriums 
and stadia capable of providing facili- 
ties for sports, music, festivals and a 
great array of civic affairs. 

The city boasts of 174 beautiful 
parks, 220 golf courses and innumer- 
able movie houses and other places 
of recreation and amusement for both 



natives and visitors. The city has 
zoos, a planetarium, a Chinatown, 
some excellent universities (the first 
atomic chain reaction was set into 
motion at the University of Chicago), 
the world's largest stockyards. 

Chicagoans say, "If you want it, we 
have it" and a sightseer's trip around 
town should be convincing. Delegates 
will be interested in seeing some of 
the new construction, office buildings, 
churches and schools. Chicago is 
proud of its progress, progress which 
they say is still in full swing. The 
Chicago story is still being told by its 
energetic citizens who are making 
dramatic progress upholding the stand- 
ards of advancement which its citizens 
have won in every walk of life. Dele- 
gates unfamiliar with the city will 
doubtless make unexpected discoveries 
which will justify the local claims that 
it is indeed one of the most interesting 
cities in the world. 



46 



THE CARPENTER 



Wins Scholarship 




L.U. 434, Chicago, 111., recently honored four veteran members for their 50 years 
of service. Two of the four are shown above. Left to right — George McPhail, L.U. 
434 president; Charles Rutledge, L.L. 272 president. Chicago Heights; two 50-year 
men Gerrit Ligivoet, Mt. Greenwood, and Andrew Piech, West Pullman. The two 
50-year men who were out of the city when the presentations were made are Peter 
Arlauski, Fernwood, and Ake Holman, South Holland. The presentations were made 
July 6. 

L.U. 430 Presents 50-Year Pins 




A $400 college scholarship has 
been awarded by L.U. 162, San 
Mateo, Calif., to Barbara Elizabeth 
Thomas, 18-year-old Sequoia high 
school graduate. Miss Thomas, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earle A. 
Thomas, 133 Woodsworth Avenue, 
Redwood City, Calif., expects to ap- 
ply her scholarship money toward 
studies in the sciences at the Univer- 
sity of California. 

The scholarship awarded is open to 
sons and daughters of members of the 
local union. The winners of the San 
Mateo scholarship have all been 
students with outstanding records. A 
scholarship committee from the Col- 
lege of San Mateo reviewed the ap- 
plicants' records for the local union. 

The local union scholarship com- 
mittee included Sam Shannon, L.U. 
162 president, Dwight Fowler, Floyd 
Murphy, Harry Rummerfield and U. 
S. Simonds, Jr. 



Henry L. Commander, L.U. 430 president, Wilkinsburg, Pa., presents 50-year pins 
to veteran members C. B. Stoner (joined in 1902); R. A. Dreisbach (joined 1909), 
and VV. S. Dick (joined in 1909). R. A. Booth, another old timer was unable to 
be present for the presentation program which was held July 11 at the Sportsmen's 
Club, Wilkinsburg. 



Reminder 

Have you registered 
yet? You may still have 
time. Consult the table 
on page 31. Remember 
— you can't vote unless 
you are registered! 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



47 



Restoring a Dull File 

When a file has become so dull its 
cutting efficiency is reduced close to zero, 
here is a treatment that will put it back 
in good shape in jig time. Dip the file 
in a bath of sulphuric acid for a few 
moments. Remove it and wash it off with 
ammonia. The acid eats away the steel 
filings which lodge between the teeth of 
the file. This is the chief cause of dull- 
ness. The acid eats away the filings in 
short order. The ammonia neutralizes 
the acid and prevents any eating away 
of the file after the filings have been 
dissolved. 

Easy Way to Divide Space 

If you ever have been faced with the 
problem of dividing a board into equal 
parts you probably gave your knowledge 
of fractions a serious workout — particu- 
larly if the board was of uneven width. 
Here is a fast and simple way of doing 
the job without fracturing your mathe- 
matics. 




Suppose you want to divide a seven 
inch board into 10 equal pieces. Take 
your rule and lay it along the board at 
an angle until the 10-inch mark touches 
one edge and the end of the rule touches 
the other, as the illustration demonstrates. 
Mark the board at every inch market 
and you have the board divided into 10 
equal parts right now. Now why didn't 
I think of that? 

Laying Out Curve 

Laying out a piece of work involving 
a curve can be a time consuming project 
in many instances. Here is a quick and 
simple way to get the job done in a 
great many cases. 



Rafter 




Thin lattice pleco iprsing 
ogainst two noils gives swoop 




THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and pub- 
lished. Send along your pet trick for 
making a job easier. It can earn you 
five dollars and the gratitude of your 
fellow members. Include a rough sketch 
from which we can make a drawing. 

A Home Vice tor Fine Work 

When working at a bench, holding a 
small, thin piece for cutting or filing 
often can become a problem. The ordi- 
nary bench vice is just not equipped to 
do the job. Here is a practical, easily- 
made vice than can solved the prob- 
lem. All that is needed is a block of 
hardwood or a piece of iron, a pair of 
pliers, and a screw salvaged from an old 
vice. 

Cut a slot in the hardwood or iron just 
wide enough to accommodate the pliers. 
Make the slot long enough to allow the 
pliers sufficient play for inserting the 




Simply take a piece of lattice strip or 
similar thin material and spring it around 
nails as illustrated in this drawing. This 
makes it child's play. 



With Thi. Device the Pliers Serve as a Vise foi 
Hoisting Tkin Pieces. 



work. Tighten the screw and you have 
the work held in place firmly and in 
position to get at easily. 

Include a Button with Your 
Plumb Bob 

An ordinary coat button can be a 
handy device for regulating the length 
of the line on your plumb bob. Thread 
the line through the button with a con- 
tinuous loop formed at the second and 
third holes as shown in the illustration. 
By adjusting the loop, the length of the 
line can be regulated to suit any job. 



Use of the button makes it unnecessary 
to tie knots in the line and at the same 
time makes it easy to adjust the length 
to precise standards quickly. 




A Handy Bench Stop Made 
In a Hurry 

The guard from an old safety razor 
can be a handy piece of equipment to 





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have in the tool box. It makes a good 
bench stop when one is needed in a 
hurry. The illustration shows how the 
guard can be mounted on an improvised 
bench with two short screws. Believe it 
or not, it does the job very efficiently. It 
can be a permanent fixture on your own 
bench too. 



Nail Pocket Idea 

Here's an idea for those who have to 
work in a bending position such as floor 
nailing operations require. A turned up 
space on the trouser leg about two by 
three inches makes a good pocket for 
nails and provides a handy place within 
easy reach. Pockets can be sewn in a 
narrow measure so the nails can be kept 
upright. Several pockets can be sewn 
in the trouser in a row. It is advisable 
to make the height of the pockets slightly 
less than the nails. Such practice will 
make it easier for the carpenter to get 
hold of the nails as he carries on his 
nailing operations. 



48 



THE CARPENTER 



V 



WILL YOU BE ABLE TO 
LOOK YOUR KIDS IN THE 
EyE OH HOVEMBER 91 





ty x r7\ 



You won't if you neglect to vote on 
November 8. This is a rough world we 
are passing on to the next generation. 
International tensions are mounting. Un- 
employment seems stalled at 5%. Infla- 
tion is shrinking the pay check. We need 
positive action to insure: 



FASTER ECONOMIC GROWTH 



STRONGER SCHOOLS 



BETTER UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



HEALTH CARE FOR THE AGED 



AID TO DEPRESSED AREAS 



FAIRER LABOR LEGISLATION 



CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 



ADEQUATE NATIONAL DEFENSE 



The men we elect to Congress on November 8 will decide how far and 
how fast these programs will be developed. Your kids and mine will be 
the beneficiaries or the victims. We owe it to them to vote for men who 
understand the problems and are willing to work for effective solutions. 



PLAY FAIR WITH YOUR KIDS- 

and for 



'- 





HOME FOR THE AGED 

LAKELAND, FLORIDA 





A 





I 



Keep your balance 
— don't twist un- 
der strain or jerk 
the load. 

Bull strength isn't 
enough — you 
have to apply 
power where it 
counts. 






THE COVER 

This month's cover is as timely as today's news. The 
photograph shows construction work on the Presidential 
Inaugural Stands in Capitol Plaza where John F. 
Kennedy will be sworn in as thirty-fifth President 
January 20. Carpenters have had a big hand in pre- 
inaugural work. They not only built the stands, but 
they also constructed the long lines of spectator 
seats along the parade route on famed Pennsylvania 
Avenue leading from Capitol Hill to the White House. 
Carpenter in the middleground is R. C. Johnson, Local 
1590. He has been a member of the Washington, D. C. 
local 30 years and has worked on three inaugural stands. 



MBP 





United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 



ON page 1 1 of this issue are 
the latest Progress Report 
pictures of our new headquar- 
ters building in Washington. 

Last month's snow made a 
perfect setting for photograph- 
ing our building at its finest. 
No member can look at the pic- 
tures on page 10 without feel- 
ing a glow of pride in his 
organization. By mid-summer 
the General Office will be com- 
pleting the move from Indian- 
apolis and our Brotherhood 
will be entering a new era of 
progress. 

This issue of the magazine 
was printed in Washington. 
Therefore it represents the first 
important step in the transfer 
of Brotherhood operations 
to Washington. 

Changing from our own 
printing plant in Indianapolis 
to Merkle Press in Washington 
was no simple matter. This 
issue was produced under 
many handicaps. If there are 
errors or shortcomings, we beg 
our readers' indulgence. 

But the most pleasant duty 
of this, the first issue of our 
new magazine, is to extend to 
officers and members every- 
where sincerest good wishes for 
a happy and prosperous 1961. 



VOLUME LXXXI Peter Terzick, Editor NO. 1 

JANUARY, 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

4 The CARPENTER Makes Bow in New Format 

6 Stock Offered in New Portland Paper 

7 Record Blood Contribution Made 
9 New Jersey Council Fulfills Pledge 

11 Building Progress Report 

12 Canadian Section 

16 CARPENTER Editor Named General Treasurer 

DEPARTMENTS 

2 Washington Roundup 

15 In Memoriam 

17 Editorials 

20 Ammunition for the Budget Battle 

23 Official Information 

25 Local Union News 

27 Outdoor Meanderings 

29 What's New 

31 Craft Problems 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579-P should be sent to THE 
CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington 18. D. C. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20< in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 




WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



NEW YEAR 
NEW PROBLEMS 



With this issue we go into another year, a new year 
with new problems and some old problems which are 
unpleasantly persistent. On page 4 is a notation of the 
moving of The Carpenter from Indianapolis to Washington. 
This move was described in detail in last month's issue, 
the final one to be published in Indianapolis. As we 
indicated last month, we hope to bring the members a con- 
stantly improving publication, but we cannot refrain from 
saying one thing: the dedication toward bringing the 
membership a truthful, hard-hitting and informative journal 
which has been our proud tradition will not be changed. 

All eyes will be on Washington this month and par- 
ticularly on January 20 when the new President and Vice 
President take office. When Earl Warren, Chief Justice of 
the United States, swears in John Fitzgerald Kennedy as 
thirty-fifth President, an old era will end and a new one 
will be ushered in for the nation. The new officials 
heading the Government will comprise the new leadership 
which the people elected on November 8. And with this new 
leadership will come new ways of doing things and new 
methods of tackling old problems. 



GREAT TASKS FOR 
NEW LEADERS 



The first task the new President had on his hands was 
that of selecting his official family, including the Cabinet 
and the heads of key agencies in the Government. While it 
is too early to appraise the Cabinet, we must conclude 
that by and large Mr. Kennedy has done a pretty creditable 
job. We would by no means agree with all the choices, 
but probably no one else would either. The President as 
the directing head of the Executive Branch is responsible 
for the conduct of the Cabinet and executive agencies 
and hence should be given a free hand in naming those with 
whom he must work from day to day. 



INAUGURAL 

PROGRAM 

AVAILABLE BY MAIL 



There is a footnote on the color interest in the 
inauguration which we would like to mention at this point. 
The Official Inaugural Program, a 64-page magazine-size 
publication, will be available early in January for those who 
wish to have it before Inauguration Day. A preview of 
the contents indicates that this booklet will be a souvenir 
of lasting interest. A number of nationally known writers 
have articles in the publication and although we are 
inaugurating a Democratic President, the program book is 
one which should make every citizen proud. Partisanship has 
been sidetracked in the preparation of the book. The 
Inaugural Committee, Liberty Loan Building, 14th and D Sts., 
S.W., Washington 25, D.C. is making this book available at 
$1.25 post paid. If you are interested, send your check or 
money order to the Inaugural Committee (no stamps) and 

you will get your book when it is available it's a real 

buy. 



THE CARPENTER 



JOBS NO. 1 
ON AGENDA 



OUTLOOK FOR 
CONSTRUCTION 



HOUSING 

PROSPECTS 

APPEAR BRIGHTER 



SCHOOL NEEDS 
HIGH ON LIST 



One of the really serious problems confronting the 
new President and new Administration is by no means a new 
one. It is an old problem which is one of the profound 

challenges of our time that of unemployment. We have 

pockets of unemployment in this country which we call the 
"depressed areas". These sections have been hard hit by 
industries which have changed methods of work or have 
moved out of the area. Mining and textile communities have 
been particularly seriously affected. 

As we look into the problem of unemployment, we also 
look at ways and means for dealing with it. The obvious 
answer to joblessness is, of course, jobs. The questions 
raised are: how, where and when? One thing the new 
Administration can do is to get the interstate highway 
program back on schedule. We note that Mr. Kennedy has 
named a new Federal Highway Administrator and maybe that is 
a good sign. The roads program with its big construction 
impact will be a useful weapon in the war against 
unemployment. 

As we look into this business of construction as a 
way of combatting unemployment, we are pleased to find 
that the general outlook for 1961 appears to be promising. 
The Associated General Contractors of America, Inc. in its 
forecast for the year sees a volume which will nudge the 
$77 billion mark. This would be several percentage points 
above the 1960 mark even though the 1960 peak was above 
that of any previous year. The AGO estimate is a healthy 
one and we sincerely hope that it materializes. 

One aspect of construction which the AGC and other 
forcasters seem to agree on is found in the expected rise 
in residential building which has been showing real signs 
of weakness recently. We note by one of the investment 
advisory services that there promises to be a "dramatic 
reversal" of the recent trend. 

Despite the fact that we seem to be in a recession, 
we are noting a long range trend in rising outgo, what 
the economists call "disposable income." This is an 
important factor in the residential construction picture. 
As more and more money is available for "disposing", more 
and more will find its way into the home buying market. 
Public officials will continue to give attention to 
housing credit as one of the keys to more and more home 
purchasing and residential construction. The President- 
elect has indicated that housing is an area in which prior 
attention would be given this year. 

And when we talk about the number of households and 
families, we are reminded of schools and educational needs, 
another area of priority attention. The need for 
educational facilities is one which should require no 
extensive documentation. During this academic year we have 
34,380,000 elementary school pupils, 10,290,000 in high 
schools and 3,980,000 in colleges. These are big figures 
compared to our pre-war totals (1937-38): 22,106,447 
in elementary schools, 6,747,674 in high schools, and 
1,350,905 in college. 

These figures on a rising curve mean that we need 

more of everything which makes up our educational system 

school buildings, gymnasiums, research centers, dormitories, 
college buildings, teachers. This costs money, but if we 
are to have a nation which is not illiterate, we must face 
the growing problem of growing educational challenges. 
Education is one of our top problems and one which 
is bound to receive early attention. 



JANUARY, 1961 



THE CARPENTER MAKES A 
BOW IN ITS NEW FORMAT 



WITH this issue. THE CAR- 
PENTER officially begins print- 
ing in Washington, D.C. This issue 
also introduces our new size and 
format. Changing over involved some 
sizeable problems which time will 
eliminate. Therefore it is our ambition 
to make future issues bigger, better, 
and more attractive. It is the sincere 
hope of the General Office that the 
new magazine meets with your ap- 
proval. 

In its eighty-year history THE 
CARPENTER has published in 
several cities and appeared in various 
sizes and formats. The magazine was 
born in St. Louis in May of 1881. Its 
original purpose was to educate the 
many widely scattered unions as to the 
need for establishing a strong national 
union capable of redressing the wide- 



spread wrongs prevailing in the con- 
struction industry at the time. 

That the magazine did its job well 
is attested to by the fact that 36 dele- 
gates representing 14 local unions in 
1 1 cities met in Chicago in August of 
1881 to bring into being the organiza- 
tion which eventually developed into 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

With the formation of our Brother- 
hood, THE CARPENTER became the 
official voice of the organization. For 
the first 7 months it was published out 
of the provisional headquarters of the 
union in St. Louis. In December of 
1881, the General Office moved to 
New York and the magazine moved 
with the office. The General Office 
and the magazine were located at 184 
Williams Street, New York. 

Apparently that remained the ad- 
dress until the year 1884. The 




Pressmen check first sheets of January cover as they roll off the press. This 
month our magazine makes its debut in all new size and formal at printing 
plant located in Washington, D.C. Highspeed presses are shown in background. 



November, 1884, issue of the maga- 
zine carried a notice announcing the 
removal of the General Office to 
Cleveland. The only address given 
was "Lock Box 180, Cleveland". For 
some three years headquarters re- 
mained in Cleveland. 

The January, 1887 issue of the 
magazine announced that headquarters 
had been moved to 476 No. Sixth 
Street, Philadelphia. The following 
year the masthead listed our head- 
quarters address as "124 No. Ninth 
Street". This was the October, 1888, 
issue. 

Eleven years later, the organization 
moved to still another address in 
Philadelphia. The May, 1899, issue 
listed the "Lippincott Building, 46 No. 
Twelfth Street" as the official address 
of our Brotherhood. 

A few years later, the Atlantic City 
Convention voted to move headquar- 
ters to Indianapolis, Indiana, the popu- 
lation center of the nation at the 
time. In January, 1903, the move to 
Indianapolis was made. 

The first address of the General 
Office and magazine in Indianapolis 
was "Stevenson Building", where the 
organization maintained a suite on the 
fifth floor. In 1904 the organization 
changed its address without moving 
when the name of the building was 
changed to "State Life Building". 

By now our Brotherhood was de- 
termined to have its own headquarters 
building. The next convention author- 
ized the officers to explore the feasi- 
bility of making such a move. After 
a good deal of study, it was determined 
that the property at 222 E. Michigan 
was an ideal site for such a home. 
During the next five years the site was 
purchased and the present building 
was designed and erected thereon. 

In May of 1909 our Brotherhood 
officially moved into its present head- 
quarters at 222 E. Michigan. 

All the while the headquarters of 
our Brotherhood were moving from 
city to city, the printing of the maga- 
zine was contracted out to commercial 
firms. Even during the first dozen 
years the General Office was located 
in Indianapolis THE CARPENTER 
was printed by a commercial shop. 

But continuing studies by the 
General Officers convinced them that 
money could be saved by establishing 
a printing plant of our own. When 
the facts and figures were presented 
to the 18th General Convention, the 
delegates authorized the General Ex- 
ecutive Board to undertake such a 
project. 

Within the next few years a separate 
building was erected behind the Gen- 



THE CARPENTER 



eral Office to house the printing plant. 
The best in printing machinery was 
purchased and installed. So in the 
year 1915 the printing of THE CAR- 
PENTER in our own printing plant 
began. 

In the 45 years since that time the 
magazine has rolled off the presses 
in our own printing plant. There have 
been breakdowns, paper shortages, 
and crises of all kinds, but the maga- 
zine never failed to come out on 
schedule. 

With the move of the General Of- 
fice to Washington, the printing of the 
magazine again became a problem. 
Technological progress revolutionized 
the printing industry in the past 25 
years. Machinery has become in- 
creasingly efficient, but also increas- 
ingly expensive. A high-speed color 
press costs the better part of a million 
dollars. But it is capable of running 
off an issue of our magazine in two 
or three days. Purchase of such a 
press would mean a very expensive 
piece of equipment sitting idle three- 
fourths of the time. 

The General Executive Board care- 
fully studied all the angles connected 
with printing the magazine in Wash- 
ington. The feasibility of buying new 
equipment and installing it in our new 
building was explored. Printing firms 
were approached to submit bids on 
printing the magazine. When the re- 
sults were compared, the Board de- 
cided that contracting out the printing 
of the magazine was the cheapest and 
most satisfactory method of handling 
the problem. 

A number of the top printing firms 
in Washington were invited to submit 
bids. When the bids were compared, 
the Board found that Merkle Press, 
publisher of many national magazines, 
offered the most satisfactory proposal. 
This issue is the first to be produced 
in the Merkle plant. 

For the past 45 years THE CAR- 
PENTER has operated on a per capita 
tax allocation of five cents. Printing 
costs during the period more than 
quadrupled. With a bigger and more 
attractive magazine in the making, the 
Special Convention held in Chicago 
in September of last year unanimously 
voted to increase the per capita tax 
by an additional five cents to ade- 
quately finance the new publication. 

Thus THE CARPENTER enters a 
new era of service to the membership 
of our Brotherhood. Its only aim is 
to inform, enlighten and, if possible, 
inspire, members to become better 
citizens, better union members and 
more responsible human beings. 

JANUARY, 1961 




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Name_ 



_Age_ 




Stock Offered in New 
Portland Labor Newspaper 



December 12, 1960 
Mr. Peter Terzick, Editor 
Carpenter Magazine 

Dear Mr. Terzick: 

It has been brought to my attention that the Carpenter is going 
to carry an ad for the sale of stock in the Reporter Publishing 
Company, Inc., Portland, Oregon. 

This is a battle between organized labor in Portland against 
the Newhouse chain of newspapers, and the striking Stereotypers' 
Union and the locked out eight other newspaper unions. 

November 10, 1959 when these people reported for work, they 
found themselves locked out, and have never been asked to return 
to work. Some of these have served the Oregonian or the Oregon 
Journal for thirty to forty years. 

The Oregonian and the Oregon Journal combined to print and 
distribute a daily paper; doing so with imported strikebreakers, 
who had already been recruited and were transported and housed 
in local hotels prior to the strike. 

I am writing you because I feel our membership should know 
there is a pattern here parallel to the newspaper persecution and 
newspaper conviction by innuendoes and lies against Brothers Hutch- 
eson, Blaier and Chapman. It would seem that honest journalism 
is missing in Indiana as it is in our part of Oregon. 

Shortly after Newhouse had purchased the Oregonian, his edi- 
tors started convicting a great many labor leaders in Portland. 
This was done by half insinuations, lies and suppositions until 
the people of Oregon had publicly convicted our Mayor Terry 
Schrunk as a labor leader; Clyde Crosby, a teamster leader, etc. 
In all 162 indictments, followed the trend, all accused were sub- 
sequently found guilty of nothing but being good citizens when 
their cases were brought before juries. This cost the taxpayers 
of Oregon a quarter of a million dollars, and only accomplished 
the sale of papers to further enrich the Newhouse chain. 

The Reporter was born as a weekly news report to the union 
people of Oregon who were without news because they refused to 
buy the scab papers. It has now progressed to the point in history 
where it is going to become an independent daily newspaper, com- 
posed throughout by union people. We are determined to use this 
paper and all its power to fight this Newhouse octupus — to give 
this large area an independent paper, union operated — a free 
press, giving honest and unbiased news. It is to be liberal in 
its views. 

The writer has devoted his whole time since June 13, 1960 to 
try to bring this about. First, I raised ^150,000 to buy a build- 
ing to place the Reporter. The I.T.U. bought a press and all its 
accessories and put them in the building. All of this equipment 
is in and working. Now, we need working capital. 

I am certain that should labor lose the fight for a union 
paper, and honest news services here in Portland, that no union 
security will be found anywhere. 

You can see by what I have said, the people of Oregon and 
Indiana live under the same tyranny of dishonest and conniving 
newspapers whose sole purpose is to destroy labor by destroying 
our faith in our leaders, and subsequently losing faith in our- 
selves. 

I am personally convinced that Brothers Hutcheson, Blaier and 
Chapman have been convicted because the public of Indiana had 
been brain washed prior to the jury trial. I am equally con- 
vinced that the Supreme Court when receiving this paper con- 
viction by lies and half truths, will exonerate them. 

It is my hope some of our brotherhood throughout the country 
will buy some of this common stock the ad shows is for sale. It 
may someday prove to be a very valuable asset. 

Very truly yours, 

Asa T. Williams, Sr. 
President, Local 226, 

Carpenter and Joiners of America 
President, District Council of 

Carpenters Portland and Vicinity 
ATW : tab 



An Offering 
of Shares 

[common stock 
par value $10 

in 



] 






J orllcind 

REPORTER 

Publishing Co., Inc. 

a New Liberal Newspaper 

for Portland, Oregon 

is being made by a 

Prospectus 

which may be obtained 

from the company at 

901 -V Corbett Building 
Portland 4, Oregon . 

• 

Among the persons 

who have already 

purchased shares are 

U. S. Senator 
Wayne L. Morse 

and 

U. S. Senator 
Maurine Neuberger 



THE CARPENTER 



Record Contribution 
To Blood Bank Made 
By California Group 



IN four hours on Saturday morning, 
October 29, 175 units of blood 
were donated to the Peninsula Memo- 
rial Blood Bank by union members 
and their wives in tribute to Joseph F. 
Cambiano, member of the General 
Executive Board of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America and an outstanding 
California labor leader for nearly 60 
years. 

Away back in 1942 the labor move- 
ment of San Mateo, Menlo Park and 
vicinity formed the Peninsula Memo- 
rial Blood Bank to make blood avail- 
able to union members and their 
families and the community as a 
whole. Over the past eight or nine 
years the blood bank has saved un- 
told lives and restored many ill and 
crippled people to useful, productive 
lives. 

As a promotional effort for the 
blood bank, the San Mateo Building 
Trades Council semi-annually sponsors 
a '"B" Day to focus attention on the 
program and enlist new donors. The 
October 29 "B" Day was dedicated to 
Brother Cambiano in recognition of 
his years of faithful service to the 
labor movement and the community at 
large. 

It turned out to be one of the 
biggest days in the history of the blood 
bank. Several hundred persons showed 
up to give blood or otherwise lend a 
helping hand. They ate breakfast with 
Brother Cambiano and pitched in to 
make the day a tremendous success. 



1 






Certificate of 'Recognition and Appreciation Award 



In 

Joseph £. Cambiano 

for oirtsianoinn; 6EiUire to labor anb Ms rommmtittT 
^trracrdcit "Blmjit ?tank Bun" jsafurtrau, ©dober 29, 1960 

bsoicaito to Iron frtr 
tilie Building and Construction 'Grades Council of San CDateo County 



H 

I 



T 







-£^2w- 






Certificate of Recognition awarded to Joseph F. Cambiano on "Blood Bank Day" in 
recognition of community services. California blood bank was formed in 1942. 



Earl Honerlah, "B" Day Chairman, 
with Co-Chairmen J. J. Minehan of 
San Bruno; Jack Weare, Sr. of Red- 
wood City and Walter Skoczylas of 
Menlo Park were jubilant upon receiv- 
ing the results of the blood drive from 
Mrs. Paul J. Hanzlik, Administrator of 
the Peninsula Memorial Blood Bank. 

A check by blood bank officials 
indicates that union members had 
saved something like $34,952.50 
through the blood bank in the years 
of its operation. Savings to United 
Brotherhood members alone totaled 
nearly SI 6,000 even before the "B" 
Day sponsored in behalf of Brother 
Cambiano. 

State and County Officials on hand 
to congratulate Cambiano for fifty- 




President Julio Bortolazzo, College of San Mateo, dispenses coffee to members, 
wives and employes during special contribution day. Affair was a huge success. 



seven years of service to labor and his 
community were — California AFL- 
CIO Vice President, Robert J. O'Hare; 
Southern California Apprentice Ad- 
ministrator, Charles Sanford; Brother- 
hood of Carpenters Vice President at 
large Dr. Les Gables; State Building 
Trades Council President Bryan 
Deavers; State Building Trades Coun- 
cil Secretary James Ward; Bay District 
Council of Carpenters President Albert 
Figone: Chairman, Board of Super- 
visors San Mateo County, Thomas J. 
Callan, Sr.; Supervisor San Mateo 
County, Louis T. Chess; and President 
of Peninsula Memorial Blood Bank, 
Dr. Carl Hoag. 

President, Building Trades Council 
of San Mateo County, Henry P. 
Schwab, after expressing a few re- 
marks on the outstanding civic and 
labor record of Cambiano, presented 
him with a framed scroll on behalf of 
the Building and Construction Trades 
Council. 

Coordinator U. S. Simonds read 
congratulatory telegrams and letters 
from the following: 

International President of the Car- 
penters — Maurice Hutcheson; Inter- 
national Secretary of the Carpenters 
— R. E. Livingston; Governor. State 
of California. Edmund G. Brown; 
National Chairman Community 
Service AFL-CIO — Leo Pedis: Pres- 
ident Building Trades Department, 
Bay Counties District Council of 
Carpenters, C. Bartalini; Secretary- 



JANUARY, 1961 




No RISK TRIAL 



Culinary detail includes, left to right. Earl Honerlah, B.A., L.U. 162; Joseph F. 
Cambiano, L.U. 162 board member; U. S. Simonds, Jr., L.U. 162 coordinator and 
Building Trades business manager; J. J. Minehan. B.A., L.U. 848; Win. Baumbach. 
L.U. 848 fin. sec; Jack Weare, B.A., L.U. 1408 and Walter Skoczylas, L.U. 828. 



Treasurer Santa Clara District 
Council of Carpenters, F. O. Jorgen- 
sen; Secretary-Treasurer California 
Labor AFL-CIO, Thomas Pitts; Past 
President National Home Builders, 
David Bohannan: National A.G.C. 
President, Frank Burrows; President 
Peninsula General Contractors' As- 
sociation. Herman Christensen, Jr.; 
President College of San Mateo, Dr. 
Julio Bortolazzo; International Vice 
President Laborers, Lee Lalor; 
Secretary Bay Counties District 
Council of Carpenters, Chester Bar- 
tafini: Chairman California Com- 
munity Service AFL-CIO, Sam 
Eubanks; President San Mateo 
County Development Association 
William F. Morton; President San 
Mateo Chamber of Commerce, 
Kenneth W. Van Gundy; San Mateo 
Building Trades Legal Council, 
Ernest Norback. 

Cambiano, in a brief resume, gave 
an interesting report of labor's activi- 
ties in the early days of San Mateo 
County and expressed his appreciation 
to the many who were a part of this 
wonderful blood drive for the benefit 
of all the people. He presented to the 
top man on the Totem Pole, Kent 
Hopkirk of Carpenters Local 162, a 
pin which designated he had given his 
49th unit of blood on this memorable 
occasion. 

He also paid special tribute to U. S. 
Simonds, Jr. who, as the Representa- 
tive of Carpenters Local 162 of San 
Mateo, in 1941, suggested the Blood 
Bank for San Mateo County and or- 
ganized a committee to carry it 
through. 



The Peninsula Memorial Blood 
Bank, a non-profit organization, was 
established in 1942 and elected 
Simonds Vice President, a position to 
which he has been reelected each year 
since that time. Thus it is a carpenter's 
dream come true. 




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Ideas, Construction Details, and 
Labor-Saving Pointers on 

KITCHEN 
CABINETS 



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"HOW TO BUILD CABINETS 
FOR THE MODERN KITCHEN" 

by ROBT. P. STEVENSON 

Asst. Managing Editor, Popular Science 

INCLUDES 70 TYPES OF CABINETS 

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□ Check 



□ Money Order 



Address 



City 



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8 



THE CARPENTER 



N. J. COUNCIL FULFILLS 
$10,000 RUTGERS PLEDGE 



MORE and more State Universities 
are concerning themselves with 
bringing their facilities, skills, and 
know-how to bear on the improvement 
of labor-management relations. A 
pioneer in this field has been Rutgers 
University, the State University of 
New Jersey. For many years Rutgers 
has conducted seminars and institutes 
on labor problems. 

Recently the Rutgers Institute of 
Management-Labor relations under- 
took to build a fine new center fi- 
nanced chiefly by voluntary donations 
from management and labor. 

The New Jersey State Council of 
Carpenters is the first state labor 
group to make the final payment on 
its pledge to the Labor Unit of the 
proposed new home for the Rutgers 
Institute of Management and Labor 
Relations. A check for the balance 
of the council's $10,000 contribution 
was presented to Dr. Irvine L. H. 
Kerrison, Institute Director of De- 
velopment, at the annual banquet dur- 
ing the Carpenters' 50th convention 
recently in Atlantic City. 

"We are pleased," stated council 
board member Raleigh Rajoppi, "to 
honor our pledge of $10,000 to Amer- 
ica's first university Labor Education 
Center. This is another indication of 
our organization's interest in adult 



education for our membership and 
particularly in that provided by our 
State University. I want to express my 
appreciation also of the interest in this 
project shown by my colleagues in the 
council. Without the cooperation and 
team work I had our campaign would 
not have been possible." 

Rajoppi also announced that a cam- 
paign to raise further funds for the 
Center will be initiated immediately 
in the second district of the union 
over which, as International Board 
Member, he has jurisdiction. This 
campaign will be followed by other 
campaigns throughout the interna- 
tional union with a minimum goal of 
$50,000 from the Carpenters for the 
Center. 

The state council has participated in 
the activities of the Rutgers Institute 
Labor Program for the past decade 
and has a representative on that pro- 
gram's Trade Union Consulting Com- 
mittee. Emphasis of the Carpenters- 
Rutgers education program during the 
past two years has been upon 
economic and political education and 
the Council is one of the twelve union 
groups formally participating in the 
Union Leadership Academy. 

Past gifts of the carpenters to the 
State University include the purchase 
of Mettler's Woods as a center for 




botanical research and construction of 
a cottage on that site. 

"In giving both to the Hutcheson 
Memorial Forest and the Labor Edu- 
cation Center," stated Kerrison, "the 
Carpenters stand in the forefront of 
U.S. trade unions esteemed by the 
community for their public spirited- 
ness." 



New York Mayor Wields 
Union Label Gavel 




Raleigh Rajoppi, left, presents New Jersey State Council of Carpenters' gift to the 
Rutgers Lahor Education Center Building Fund. Accepting for Rutgers is Dr. Irvine 
L. H. Harrison, extreme right. Looking on is James Moss, council sec. treas. 



New York's Mayor Robert F. Wagner, 
center, receives a union-made gavel, the 
work of Edward Napieralski, L.U. 1401, 
Buffalo, N. Y. Presenting the gavel are 
Union Label & Service Trades officials. 
At left in photo is Harry Avrutin, secre- 
tary-treasurer, and at extreme right is 
Moe Rosen, president of the N. Y. group. 

The Mayor of the City of New 
York, Honorable Robert F. Wagner, 
steers the destiny of the world's 
largest metropolis with a union made, 
union labeled gavel presented to him 
by officials of the Union Label and 
Service Trades Council of Greater 
New York, AFL-CIO. The gavel was 
made for the New York Mayor by 
Edward Napieralski, Buffalo, N.Y., 
Carpenters Union Local 1401. Nap- 
ieralski is a Vice-President of the 
Union Label and Service Trades De- 
partment of the State of New York. 
The Mayor received the gavel on the 
occasion of his signing a Union Label 
Week Proclamation. 

While issuing his 1960 Union Label 
Week Proclamation, Mayor Wagner 
issued a strong endorsement, of union 
made products and services. After 
publicly designating Union Label 
Week, Mayor Wagner said, ". . . the 
display of the (AFL-CIO) Union 
Labels, Shop Cards and Service But- 
tons is an indication that the products 
and services offered have been pro- 
duced by men and women working 
under advanced standards of fair em- 
ployment." 



JANUARY, 1961 



Arizonans Honor Large Class of New Journeymen 




Thirty-four new journeymen were awarded completion cer- 
tificates at an apprenticeship banquet at the Westward Ho 
Hotel, Phoenix, Ariz., May 26, with Arizona Supreme Court 
Justice C. Bernstein giving the principal address. The new 
journeymen were sponsored by the Central Arizona Carpenters' 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Front row, left to right, 
Herbert McDonald, Jerry Crittenden, James Cbaney, Howard 
Locklar, Edward Jolly, Claude Hobbs, Ronald Asbury, James 
Abbott and Raymond Adrian. Second row, John Doolin, 



Arthur Wahlers, Clyde Wilson, Victor Larson, William Led- 
better, Kenneth Davis, Leon Cherry, Robert Levenda and 
Richard Blazer. Third row, Robert Thomas, Edmund Zozaya, 
Kenway Dick, Duane Kemper, Frank Evans, Donald Christian, 
Donald Bonner, Anselmo Culling and Joseph Clark. Those 
receiving their certificates but who were not shown in the 
photo above are Edgar Chesley, Clyde Christensen, Gene 
Chambers, Ken Porterm, James Ridge, Robert Selph and 
Harvey Whitlock. 



James W. Curray Given Testimonial 




General Representative James W. Curray was honored at a testimonial dinner in 
Berkeley, Calif., by members and friends of Millwrights Local 102, Oakland, Calif., of 
which the guest of honor was formerly business representative. Past President D. W. 
Hedlund, master of ceremonies, presented Mr. Curray, on behalf of the sponsors 
a handsome watch, suitably engraved. More than 150 attended the testimonial which 
included General Representatives Charles Nichols and Clarence E. Briggs; H. J. 
Harkleroad, executive secretary, State Council of Carpenters; Byron Devers, president, 
State Building & Construction Trades Council; Abel Silva, Western Regional Director, 
State Building & Construction Trades Council; A. A. Figone, president, Bay Counties 
District Council. Mrs. Carl E. Bremer was dinner chairman. 



2,000,000 Workers 
Bargained For in 61 

WASHINGTON (PAI)— Collec- 
tive bargaining agreements affecting 
nearly 2,000,000 organized workers 
expire in 1961 with the major bar- 
gaining activity centered in the auto- 
mobile industry where contracts are 
due to expire in August and Septem- 
ber. 

Important negotiations also are due 
in trucking (January), rubber (April 
through June), meatpacking (August), 
machinery (September) and possibly 
coal which is subject to 60 days' 
notice. 

In addition more than 60 agree- 
ments covering 1,700,000 workers per- 
mit reopening on general wage 
changes. 

Finally, at least 2,900,000 workers 
will receive deferred wage increases 
in 1961 as a result of past bargain- 
ing with the most frequent boost be- 
tween 8 and 9 cents an hour. 

Among the workers scheduled to 
receive deferred increases are 1,100,- 
000 covered by cost-of-living escala- 
tor clauses. Altogether, the Labor 
Department estimates, between 2,500.- 
000 and 2,800,000 workers are cov-' 
ered by cost-of-living escalator clauses. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 





: : : . ,:■ 



These photos of our new 
headquarters building under 
construction in Washington, 
D. C, were taken last month 
just after nearly a foot of 
snow fell in the Nation's 
Capital. Because of snow, 
work on the outside of build- 
ing was virtually halted but 
interior work continued to 
progress on schedule. 





PROGRESS 







Maze of piping at left will 
carry hot air in winter and 
cool air in summer to offices 
throughout building. Long 
tanks are part of air condi- 
tioning unit Insulated and 
aluminum foil wrapped ducts 
at right help insure against 
drop in cooling, hearing effi- 
ciency of air conditioning 
and heating units. Bottom 
photo of white-faced build- 
ing, show contrasts sharply 
with lifeless arms of tree. 





JANUARY, 1961 



11 



■^L. 




JOB PICTURE DARKENS 




The word "unemployment" was 
studiously avoided in the Speech from 
the Throne outlining the Canadian 
government's legislative program for 
the current year. 

But the word and the problem are 
on everybody's lips. 

The Canadian Labour Congress fore- 
cast that unemployment this winter 
will be the worst since the end of 
World War II. The grimness of this 
prediction can be measured by re- 
calling that the previous postwar peak 
three years ago left 10 per cent of 
the country's labor force looking for 
work. 

International Labour Organization 
statistics show that Canada's percent- 
age of jobless during 1960 was the 
highest in the Western world. 

Just as disturbing as these figures 
is the labor force trend: the increase 
in job opportunities is failing to keep 
pace with the growth in the work 
force. In 1959, the increase in jobs 
fell 250,000 short of matching the rise 
in the labor force. Researchers esti- 
mate the gap in 1960 was between 
300,000 and 350,000. 

The 45,000-member Ontario Car- 
penters Council in its own brief to 
the provincial administration branded 
the government's approach to unem- 




Claude Jodoin, president, Canadian Labour Congress, speaks at November conven- 
tion of Ontario Federation of Labour. At the table with President Jodoin are David 
Archer, Ontario Federation president, Rev. David Summers, executive secretary. 
Religion and Labour Foundation, and William Dodge, CLC executive vice president. 
In background is D. F. Hamilton, sec.-treas. of Ontario Federation and a Carpenter. 



ployment as totally inadequate. After 
surveying its affiliated locals, the coun- 
cil felt that provincial projects, for 



example, could be scheduled in such 
a way as to improve employment 
during the winter months. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



What is labor's approach to the 
problem? 

Nothing less than a massive expan- 
sion of the public sector of the 
economy to push up the rate of na- 
tional growth, to restore and maintain 
full employment, the labor congress 
affirms. In a series of submissions to 
the government, the congress has also 
pressed for an increase in purchasing 
power through tax reductions and 
bolstered social security measures and 
the full use of federal powers to en- 
courage secondary industry, redevelop 
depressed areas and retrain displaced 
workers. 

The federal government's response, 
as spelled out in the parliamentary 
Throne Speech and subsequent bills, 
embraces a promise of more winter 
works, an easing of mortgage terms 
for new housing, guaranteed loans to 
small business and establishment of a 
productivity council. 

The government's housing legisla- 
tion trims required down payments, 
raises loan ceilings and extends the 
maximum repayment period from 30 
to 35 years. But there was no move 
to cut the prevailing 6% per cent in- 
terest rate. 

The labor congress welcomed the 
housing legislation but saw little sign 
of government willingness to adopt 
some of its other major proposals — 
either at a special labor-management- 
government conference on unemploy- 
ment called at labor's urging or in 
Parliament itself. 

Canada has entered a new period 
of recession, the congress warns, and 
needs more thoroughgoing measures 
to reverse the slide. Among congress 
proposals: 

— Adoption of a full employment 
act, creation of a council of economic 
advisers similar to that in the United 
States and introduction of monetary 
policies designed to establish a steady 
annual 5 per cent rate of economic 
growth. 

— Large-scale investment in co- 
operation with the provinces and 
municipalities in health and hospital 
services, education, slum clearance, 
urban redevelopment, low-rental hous- 
ing, conservation, parks and roads. 



■ — Higher old age security pay- 
ments, family allowances and unem- 
ployment insurance benefits. 

■ — Subsides to reduce interest rates 
for low-cost housing. 

— Diversification of industry to aid 
depressed areas and single-industry 
centers, retraining for workers dis- 
placed by technological change and 
aid to those who must transfer to 
other jobs where jobs cannot be 
brought to the workers. 

The congress recognizes that its full 
program would require a certain 
amount of temporary deficit financing 
but it argues this is no recipe for in- 
flation. 

The country's economy is not run- 
ning at capacity or anywhere near it. 
In an economy with idle manpower, 
idle plant capacity and idle resources, 
increased purchasing power resulting 
from government borrowing by ex- 
panding credit will be used to take 
up the slack. Additional money 
creates additional demand for goods 
and services but idle resources can be 
used to satisfy this additional demand. 

At its provincial convention, the 
Ontario Federation of Labour echoed 
the central labor body's call for a 
stepped-up program of investment in 
public works and low-rental housing. 
The OFL added demands for a cut 
in the maximum work week from 48 
hours to 40 and a $1 .25 an hour wage 
floor, suggested stimulation of export 
trade and proposed an end to the 
time limit for jobless benefits. 

Through all of labor's representa- 
tions runs the theme that governmental 
bodies do not treat the mounting job 
crisis with a sense of urgency. It took 
a lower-echelon official in Ontario's 
Department of Planning and Develop- 
ment, F. J. Lyle, to mirror the union 
movement's concern. 

"Unemployment is now at a 
frighteningly high level," Lyle told an 
industrial development conference. He 
was "awed" by the scope of the prob- 
lem, he was "frightened" by the 
brutal facts. 

A recognition at all levels of govern- 
ment of the magnitude of the issues 
is a prerequisite for tackling them, 
Canadian labor insists. 



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the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

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foot building. 

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pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
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Californians add 4% 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 



JANUARY, 1961 



13 



Low Pay, Poor Working Conditions 
Plight of Independent' Loggers 



The battle continues in many areas 
of industry against management's prac- 
tice of attempting to avoid union rates 
of pay and conditions by farming out 
work to independent contractors. 

Although it makes its heaviest im- 
pact in service and maintenance fields, 
this practice can be employed any- 
where. 

The Lumber and Sawmill Workers 
division of the Carpenters Union was 
confronted with a prime example at 
a remote Northern Ontario dam site 
near Little Long Rapids. 

Here the fight revolved around the 
plight of more than 100 loggers em- 
ployed by the Ontario Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission to clear bushland 
for the big dam project. But its reper- 
cussions were broader. 

The Hydro commission simply 
maintained that these slashers be- 
longed in the category of independent 
contractors. Hydro, in fact, had 
resisted two earlier attempts at union 



organization, relying on an Ontario 
Labour Relations Board decision that 
the workers did not have employe 
status. 

The union recognized Hydro's 
action as an open invitation to private 
bush operators to do the same. What 
was to prevent these operators from 
abandoning union contracts and sign- 
ing their loggers on as "independents"? 

With the assistance of a member of 
the provincial legislature, the Carpen- 
ters Union exposed the primitive con- 
ditions under which the so-called 
"independent contractors" of Little 
Long Rapids were working — the low 
pay, a mud hole as a water source, 
no tent flooring, no proper facilities 
for washing or cooking. The same 
squalid conditions applied to other 
men employed by the subcontractor to 
salvage timber felled by the slashers. 

William Stefanovich. the Carpen- 
ters' Ontario regional director, made 
it clear that jobs on the project were 



basically piecework and should be 
covered by union contract. Acreage 
rates and cord prices paid the Hydro 
loggers were far below those paid men 
doing comparable work under union 
contract. 

Commission Vefoes Agreement 

In response to union pressure, the 
Hydro commission and the Ontario 
Health Department dispatched inspec- 
tion teams to the camp sites, then an- 
nounced a revised incentive pay 
program providing a slight monthly 
increase for the slashers. 

But when the union insisted only a 
collective agreement could ensure 
proper wages and working conditions 
for the loggers and threatened a strike 
at other Hydro projects unless the 
commission reversed its stand, Hydro 
sidestepped the issue. The commission 
ordered the slashers laid off and 
planned to burn off the timber instead 
of clearing it. 

The union had no choice but to call 
off its walkout. There was no victory 
at Little Long Rapids. However, the 
union's determined position may dis- 
courage others from trying to under- 
mine labor's rights in the guise of an 
independent contractor program. 



CLC Urges Establishment of Safety 
Group to Map Accident Prevention 



Canadian trade unions are worried 
about the rising trend of injuries on 
the job. They're concerned about the 
administration of industrial safety 
regulations and about the regulations 
themselves. 

This concern is reflected at the 
federal level in the establishment by 
the Canadian Labour Congress of a 
national safety committee. 

The committee proposes to launch 
a national program of promoting 
health and safety practices. The group 
will attempt to enlist management in 
joint action at the plant level; it will 
press for legislative action by both fed- 
eral and provincial governments; and 
it will sponsor national and regional 
conferences of unionists to map acci- 
dent prevention programs. 

In Ontario, the 450,000-member 
provincial federation of labor is on 
record as urging creation of a safety 
authority. Made up of labor, manage- 
ment and government representatives, 
the authority would be empowered to 
draw up and enforce a set of safety 
codes for each industry. 

The Ontario Federation of Labour 
made the proposal in a brief to a 



Royal Commission on Industrial 
Safety — a commission which was set 
up only after a tunnel tragedy in a 
Toronto suburb claimed the lives of 
five workmen and a coroner's jury 
revealed how outmoded were the cur- 
rent safety regulations. 

Under the OFL plan, a safety 
authority would combine the inspec- 
tion functions now exercised in hap- 
hazard fashion by the labor depart- 
ment, the Workmen's Compensation 
Board and employer-operated acci- 
dent prevention associations. 

Inspectors for the employer-domi- 
nated associations had little power, the 
federation noted. Even the compen- 
sation board had failed to exercise its 
inspection powers and the labor de- 
partment's own staff was too meager 
and had no ready access to technical 
advice. 

Weak legislation and divided 
authority seemed to combine to fore- 
stall effective public action in accident 
prevention although work injuries in 
1959 had shown an increase more 
than twice as great as the increase in 
industrial employment since 1949. 



Perhaps the federation's most telling 
point was its emphasis on the fact that 
under the present system efforts to 
prevent accidents often conflicted with 
management's desire to cut costs and 
increase production. 

"As long as accident costs do not 
rise disproportionately, there is likely 
to be some reluctance at the top level 
to devote time and money to safety 
. . . ," the federation suggested. 

"It has become too easy to blame 
accidents on 'human factors' and pass 
the cost on to the consumer." 

British Trade Union 
Accuses U.S. Company 

The 900,000 member Amalgamated 
Engineering Union of Great Britain 
has accused an American manu- 
facturer in Glasgow of importing an 
anti-union bias in dealing with or- 
ganized labor. 

The union has called on the British 
government to mediate a strike of 600 
employes of the American-owned 
American Caterpillar Tractor Com- 
pany in Uddingston, near Glasgow. 

The strike was called November 2 
in protest against the discharge of 
two men after a union organization 
meeting. Production has been at a 
halt ever since. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



L. U. NO. 4, DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Arnould, Joseph P. 
L. U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Desanto, Charles Sr. 

Pattanaro, Joseph 
L U. NO. 19, DETROIT, MICH. 

Beachler, Garland 

DeSacco, Marino 

Koppin, Roland A. 

Kowalczyk, Barney F. 
L. U. NO. 20, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Johnson, Gunner 

Mathesen, Thomas 

Sandberg, Gustave 

Toth, Michael 
L. U. NO. 29, CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Dippong, Joseph 

Grace, Murray 

Jones. Frank 

Schmitt, Edward 
L. U. NO. 30, NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Hendrickson, Anton 
L. U. NO. 33, BOSTON, MASS. 

Calabro, Constantine 

Connell, Marcus 

Guppy, Albert 

Johnston, William T. 

Josey, Curtis G. 

Proulx, Joseph 
L. U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 

Bate, Harvey 

Hayes, Robert W. 

Jutras, Wilfred 

Meuse, Charles F. 
L. U. NO. 42, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Damato, Larry 

Goldman, Adolph 

Lawrence, Frank 

Totten, George 

Ward, Montie 
L. U. NO. 44, CHAMPAIGN-URBANA, ILL. 

Kanaley, R. P. 

McCulley, Robert L. 

Villard, Walter J. 
L. U. NO. 73, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Mackey, Edward C. 
L. U. NO. 87, ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Gleiter, Glenn 

Morgen, Andrew 

Schoenberger, Henry 

Telander, Charles 
L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Buckingham, Hiram 

Fleig, William 

Harp, Bowen L. 

Pickett, Charles S. 

Walther, August M. 
L. U. NO. 109, SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Darby, R. E. 

Duncan, John F. 

Fulton, C. E. 
L. U. NO. 129, HAZELT0N, PA. 

Fellin, Victor F. 

Schade, Conrad 
L. U. NO. 132, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Allnut, John 

Binstead, P. G. 

Carroll, John W. 

Constantine, J. E. 

Dalton, James F. 

Johns, Marshall 

Johnson, John Henry 

Johnson, Onie Glenn 

King, E. G. 
McSorley, Joseph 



O'Dell, Carl E. 

Smith, William 

Swab, L. Roy 

Urie, Asa K. 

Van Cleaf, William Edward 

Ward, C. W. 
L. U. NO. 169, EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Hurst, Peter 

Rainbolt, William (Frank) 
L. U. NO. 198, DALLAS, TEXAS 

Hall, William C. 

King, J. Earl 

Terrell, George H. 

Whitfield, Tom 

Williams, James D. 
L. U. NO. 232, FT. WAYNE, IND. 

Bercot. Edward L. 

Lahrman, Clarence 

May, Charles 
L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Lauterstein, Jacob 
L. U. NO. 257, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Mattson, Alex 

Sillis, Paul 
L. U. NO. 272, CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILL. 

Hall, Ralph 

Klepper, John 

Pensinger, George 

Swingler, Edward 

Yancy. Gordon 
L. U. NO. 302, HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Dundas, A. E. 
L U. NO. 314, MADISON, WISC. 

Richgels, Lawrence 
L. U. NO. 350, NEW R0CHELLE, N. Y. 

Mamelitz, George 

Osterholm, Emil 

1. U. NO. 361, DULUTH, MINN. 
Edwards, Brede 
Egerdahl, Charley 
Johnson, Frank L. 
Onraet, Charles J. 
Pesola, Tauno 
Trudeau, Henry E. 

L. U. NO. 366, BRONX, N. Y. 
Drysdale, John 
Farrenkopf. William 

L. U. NO. 419, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Klancic, Anton 

L U. NO. 434, CHICAGO, ILL. 
Barslund, Peter 
De Koeker, Chris 
Giertz, Richard 
Gudmundson, John 
Rauwolf, George 
Uthe, Herman 

L. U. NO. 488, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Holm, John 
Nelson, Gustav 
Nisuls, John 
Nygard. Alfred 
Runne, Avo 

L. U. NO. 490, PASSAIC, N. J. 
Morici, Charles 

L. U. NO. 531, ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 
Burdett, Frank C. 
Simpson. Orin S. 

L. U. NO. 532, ELMIRA, N. Y. 
Fiske, Harry L. 

L. U. NO. 594, DOVER, N. J. 
Cole, Emery H. 

L. U. NO. 608, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Ford, Dennis 



Moriarty, Patrick 

Mullany, Thomas 
L. U. NO. 621, BANGOR, ME. 

Lambert, Clifford J. 

Leino, James H. 
L. U. NO. 708, WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Curry, Philip T. 

L. U. NO. 710, LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Ansell, Frank 

Bishop, Carl L. 

Dean. William H. 

Hardesty. Gerald 

Jordan. Thomas J. 
L. U. NO. 721, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Atkinson, M. David 

Bowman, Richard 

Gambling, Robert J. 

Leva, George 

Lewis, Albert E. 

Melcombe, A. J. 

Prime, Richard T. 

Reppe, John 
L. U. NO. 764, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Driver, A. R. 
L. U. NO. 844, RESEDA, CAL. 

Bensteel, Carl 

Bozarth. Leslie 

Ratliff. Leonard 
L. U. NO. 925, SALINAS, CAL. 

Cremona, Camillo V. 
L. U. NO. 974, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Bartolomeo, Louis 

Winter, Christian Jr. 
L. U. NO. 978, SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

Barnhart. Clifford 

Holden. William 

Jennings. Merle 

Vincent, H. A. 
L. U. NO. 982, DETROIT, MICH. 

Beyer. Henry L. 

Bruland. R. A. 
L. U. NO. 1035, TAUNTON, MASS. 

Marshall, Joseph R. 
L. U. NO. 1112, MARSHALLT0WN, IOWA 

Clark. Frank 
L. U. NO. 1134, MT. KISCO, N. Y. 

Mulone, Mathew 
L. U. NO. 1162, FLUSHING, N. Y. 

Natta, Alwyn 

Olson, Olof G. 

Pilotti, Charles 
L. U. NO. 1172, BILLINGS, MONT. 

Calkin. L. B. 
L. U. NO. 1255, CHILLICOTHE, OHIO 

Arledge, Roy 
L. U. NO. 1323, MONTEREY, CAL. 

Martin, Jesse J. 

L. U. NO. 1325, EDMONTON, ALTA. 

Demong, David Joseph 

Greenough, Charles C. 

Krenbrenk, Herman 

Laskowsky. Daniel 

Singleton, Ernest 

Weissenborn, Kurt 
L. U. NO. 1367, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Konicek. Joseph 

Schamoski, Joseph 

L. U. NO. 1397, ROSLYN, N. Y. 
Aronson. A. G. 
Grichik, John 

L. U. NO. 1456, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Aalonen. John 
Antonucci, Angelo 



JANUARY, 1961 



15 



IN MEMORIAM 

(Continued from page 15) 

Carlson. Charles 
Delaney, Martin 
Gaffney, James 
Gustavesen, Julius 
Holmberg, Karl 
Knudsen. Andrew 
Olsen. Bernt 
Olsen, Oscar M. 

L. U. NO. 1507, EL MONTE, CAL. 
Gaynor. Elmer S. 
Hughes. John V. 
Thompson. T. W. 

L. U. NO. 1513, DETROIT, MICH. 

Kaller. Jacob 

L. U. NO. 1570, MARYSVILLE, CAL. 
Accito, James T. 

L. U. NO. 1590, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Athey, Garey A. 
Devine, Herman D. 
Haskell. Frank 
Jones, Albert G. 
Owens. Harry B. 
Schroeder. Earl W. 

L. U. NO. 1598, VICTORIA, B. C. 
Dalgarno, Benjamin 

L. U. NO. 1741, MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Anschutz. Albert 
Becker, Joe 
Buff, Henry 
Fitzpatrick, Dennis 
Lange, Carl 
Marlow, Leo 
Nydahl. Christian 
Roder, Ernest 

L. U. NO. 1752, POMONA, CAL 
Collier, George P. 
Sullivan, Arthur A. 

L. U. NO. 1768, JACKSONVILLE, TEXAS 
Waites, J. W. 

L. II. NO. 1786, TINLEY PARK, ILL 

Karas. Charles 
Polaski. Walter 
Weinsheimer. George 

L. U. NO. 1822, FT. WORTH, TEXAS 
Horn. Rosco 
Pickens, Van B. 

L U. NO. 1922, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kobleski, John 
O'Connor, Eugene 
Wietrzak, Frank 

L. U. NO. 2027, RAPID CITY, S. DAK. 
Barnett, W. H. 
Kasuske, Arlo D. 

L. U. NO. 2236, BRONX, N. Y. 
Carlson, John N. 
Corti, Joseph 
Eriksson, Arvo 
Koskinen, Unto 
Laisi. Anton 
Paulsen, Paul 

L U. NO. 2274, PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Barringer, Joseph H. 
Gregory. Charles E. 
Pritts, John W. 

L. U. NO. 2435, INGLEW00D, CAL. 

Bailey. Raymond 
Patlian, Charles C. 

L. U. NO. 3206, P0MPAN0 BEACH, FLA. 
Shearer, Paul W. 



CARPENTER EDITOR NAMED 
NEW GENERAL TREASURER 




Peter Terzick 

WITH the approval of the General 
Executive Board, General Presi- 
dent Maurice A. Hutcheson last month 
named Peter Terzick, for the past 18 
years editor of THE CARPENTER, 
as General Treasurer to fill the unex- 
pired term of the late Frank Chapman. 

Like his predecessor. Brother Ter- 
zick comes out of the Northwest 
lumber industry. He began working 
in the woods as a rigging slinger and 
second loader during the late 1920's. 
For a number of years he alternately 
worked in the woods and attended the 
University of Washington. 

In the mid 1930's when the Lumber 
and Sawmill Workers Union was look- 
ing for a man to edit their new 
weekly paper, THE UNION REGIS- 
TER, Brother Terzick was their 
choice. For some six years he edited 
THE UNION REGISTER. In 1943 
he was called back to the General 
Office to take over the task of editing 
THE CARPENTER. 

A long-time member of Local 
Union No. 2635, Seattle. Brother Ter- 
zick has been a delegate to every 
General Convention since 1946. He 
served a number of years as vice presi- 
dent and then secretary of the Puget 
Sound District Council of Lumber and 
Sawmill Workers before moving to 
Indianapolis. 

Brother Terzick long has been active 
in conservation as well as union af- 
fairs. Presently he is a vice president 
of the American Forestry Association 
and also a member of the advisory 



council to the North Central Region 
of the U.S. Forest Service. In 1957-58 
he served as president of the Inter- 
national Labor Press Association. 
During 1957 he also was president of 
the Indiana State Association for 
Adult Education. 

Son of Local 1856 Member 
Wins College Scholarship 

There's a saying among Philadelphia 
Carpenters that you can't hold down 
Bill Falkowski — known better to those 
who've worked with him on various 
jobs— as "Wild Bill ! ! !" 

Turns out that there's a sizeable chip 
off the old block who won't be held 
down either — at least not scholasti- 
cally. "Wild Bill's" son, Robert Fal- 
kowski, recently won a full scholarship 
to La Salle College. A June 1960 
graduate of Northeast Catholic High 
School, he rated 1st in a class of 576 
pupils. 




Prize winner Falkowski and his dad. 

In addition, he carried off the top 
prizes in German, Latin and Religion. 
He was also right out there in front all 
during Elementary school days . . . 
first in his class at Eighth Grade 
graduation. To be the Number One 
Scholar of 1960 in his high school 
graduating class, Bob "burned the mid- 
night oil" and achieved an amazing 
General Average of 96.0. 

Eighteen-year-old Robert plans to 
be a teacher of Languages . . . prob- 
ably Latin! ! ! (Which ain't easy.) 
We're looking forward to seeing this 
L.U. 1856 Member's son making a big 
noise on the scholastic front — even 
bigger than "Wild Bill" makes on con- 
struction jobs! 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



1KMTQJRJAIL 



WHEN THE OTHER OX 
GETS GORED 

There is an old saying that holds, "It makes a big 
difference whose ox is being gored." 

Judging by the anguished screams of the 
spokesmen for big business (now that Congres- 
sional committees are looking into the ethical 
practices of corporations) there is more than a 
grain of truth in the saying. 
While various Congressional committees were 
grilling organized labor, the whole procedure aroused 
nothing but cheers from the U. S. Chamber of Com- 
merce and various spokesmen for the business point 
f view. Labor's protests that the investigation tech- 
niques were one-sided and of doubtful fairness fell 
an deaf ears insofar as business representatives were 
xmcerned. 

But a few months ago, the Kefaitver Anti-Trust 
and Monopoly Subcommittee began delving into 
the practices followed by some segments of busi- 
ness. The investigations showed heartless price 
gouging in the drug industry, all sorts of shenanigans 
in the television industry, some aspects of sports 
dominated by underworld characters. Now the 
same voices of big business that literally clapped 
their hands in glee when labor was on the griddle 
are recoiling in horror at the rough treatment being 
accorded various industries. 

A recent issue of PRINTER'S INK, a publication 
ievoted to the interests of the publishing industry, 
shed blood in its editorial pages over the treatment 
Tongressional committees have been giving various 
usiness enterprises. Said PRINTER'S INK: 

"No one, not even the President of the United 
States, possesses the powers over other human 
beings that are possessed by Congressional in- 
vestigating committees. In practice all of this 
power can be, and has been, seized by one man 
— the committee chairman. The committee 
chairman exercises his power without restraint 
of rules of procedure; there are none. He can 
ignore rights guaranteed by the Constitution. 
These are some of the powers of the committee 
chairman: 

"He can conduct proceedings with a 
quorum of one, himself. 

"He can subpoena persons and materials 
without any regard for legal safeguards 
against unreasonable intrusions, search and 
seizure. 

"He alone determines the relevancy of 
matters before the subcommittee. He can 

ANUARY, 1961 




go as far afield as he wishes from the 
matters purportedly under investigation. 

"He can, and does, require witnesses 
appearing before him to submit their testi- 
mony 24 to 48 hours beforehand. He can 
reject the testimony. 

"He enjoys Congressional immunity 
against action for libel or slander." 
The November issue of Economic Intelligence. 
published by the U. S. Chamber of Commerce, joined 
the hue and cry against unlimited Congressional in- 
vestigations. Said this worthy publication: 

"Several Congressional committees or their 
members are concerned about undue power of 
some individuals, groups and organizations in 
the private economy, but some of the latter are 
worried over undue and irresponsible power of 
Congressional committees, especially subcom- 
mittees, and even more particularly the chairman 
of the latter." 
Economic Intelligence then goes on to quote some 
of the indictments contained in PRINTER'S INK. In 
conclusion it says: 

"If enough individuals study its disclosures and 
proposals and get busy, respect for Congress will rise. 
Citizens and organizations being investigated will get 
more decent treatment. Truth will not suffer; it will be 
given better chance to emerge. . . . The need for re- 
form is urgent." 

These are the very things that this journal was 
saying several years ago when Congressional in- 
vestigations of labor were at their peak. We did not 
question the right of committees to delve into matters 
of public interest. But we did question the right of 
these committees to act as prosecutor, judge and 
jury, without any of the safeguards citizens are en- 
titled to in our courts. More than once we cited the 
case of the "sensational" labor hearings held in Port- 
land. Oregon. On the testimony of prostitutes, pimps 
and various underworld characters a number of local 
labor leaders were vilified and accused of unspeakable 
crimes. The investigations hogged headlines through- 
out the nation. Portland papers and their reporters 
received special prizes for their journalistic efforts. 
It was a tremendous show. 

The only trouble is that it turned out to be 
purely window dressing and a publicity spring- 
board for various committee members. The dis- 
closures all resulted from uncorroborated 
testimony of underworld characters. The wit- 
nesses had no opportunity to cross-examine their 
accusers. 



17 



Some 160-odd indictments grew out of the investi- 
gations. And how many of them stood up in court 
when legal rules of evidence prevailed? Not a single 
one. One by one the indictments fell short when 
those accused had the right to cross-examine, and 
hearsay from riffraff could not be accepted as evidence. 
All the while this fiasco was going on, the publica- 
tions of big business were literally dancing in glee. 
But now that the shoe is on the other foot, they are 
seriously concerned about the propriety of investiga- 
tive committees operating without any protective 
rules of procedure for those being investigated. 

As far as we are concerned, we derive no 
particular satisfaction from the fact that business 
is now on the griddle and being bulldozed by 
committees unhampered by protective rules for 
those under the gun. It was wrong for the in- 
vestigative committee in Portland to make head- 
lines out of nothing, and it is equally wrong for 
another committee to intimidate business with 
procedures that have no resemblance to judicial 
rules. 
A revamping of the procedures under which in- 
vestigative committees operate is long overdue. There 
even may be some doubt as to the need for such com- 
mittees. However, if they are needed, they ought to 
be bound by some reasonable rules of conduct that 
guarantee those being investigated some semblance 
of fair play. 

We can think of a few badly needed rules. One — 
each committee hearing should be set in motion by 
a resolution setting forth the exact subject and scope 
of the matters to be investigated by the committee. 
Two — it should be improper to release testimony 
taken in an executive session without prior authoriza- 
tion by a majority of the full committee. Three — 
every witness should be guaranteed the right to make 
an oral statement or submit a sworn one which then 
should be included in the transcript of the hearing. 
Four — release of statements or material adversely af- 
fecting an individual by a member of the committee 
staff should be prohibited unless there is a simul- 
taneous release of rebuttal. Five — persons adversely 
affected by testimony taken in public hearings should 
have the right to cross-examine witnesses, subpoena 
witnesses or documents, and be represented by coun- 
sel. In fact, they should have the right to cross- 
examine adverse witnesses regarding testimony taken 
even in executive sessions. 

These are relatively simple rules. They 
would not hamper the work of committees. 
Neither would they make it more difficult 
for committees to arrive at true facts. 
Actually, without the right to cross-examine 
it is impossible to establish true facts. 
That business publications are now awakening to 
the menace wrapped up in unrestricted authority 
vested in investigative committees is encouraging. Had 
they raised their voices in protest when labor was 
being crucified before various committees their pro- 
tests might carry more weight now. But "better late 
than never" still applies. The unearned and unwar- 



ranted damage that has been done to labor by un- 
hampered investigative committees defies description. 
That some pretty unsavory procedures are being un- 
covered in drug making, television, boxing and auto- 
mobile manufacturing affords us small consolation. 
Any barrel of apples is bound to contain a few mushy 
ones. However, if the protests of big business lead to 
the establishment of some fair investigation procedures 
that give everyone a fair chance to defend himself, the 
results may warrant the cost in unfairly damaged repu- 
tations of labor unions. 




LANDRUM GRIFFIN GIVES 
COMMUNISTS THE GREEN LIGHT 

Thanks to the framers and promoters of the Lan- 
drum-Griffin Bill, the Communists in the labor move- 
ment are once more openly sowing their seeds oi 
disruption and havoc. 

Reports from various sections of the country to 
this journal indicate that the Communist labor cells, 
which lay dormant since the beginning of World 
War II, are up to their old tricks — disrupting union 
meetings, challenging constituted authority, and fos- 
tering hatred and mistrust at every opportunity. 

Those members whose memberships date back 
beyond World War II well remember the strife 
and confusion that trained Communists can 
spread in a labor organization. Just two or three 
of them, by clever parliamentary maneuvering, 
endless oratory, and sly whispering campaigns 
can undercut the effectiveness of a local union or 
council to the point where it becomes bogged 
down in hatred, strife, and internal dissension. 
During the war years the Communists were quies- 
cent, of course, because the fate of Russia was hang- 
ing in the balance. In the years after the war the Red 
cells stayed underground. Alert union officers made 
it difficult for them to implement their disruptive 
schemes. 

But then came the Landrum-Griffin Bill 
with its drastic limitations on the authority 
of elected officers. Apparently this gave the 
Communists the green light to emerge from 
their underground cells to resume the dis- 
ruptive tactics they developed before World 
War II. The waning of prosperity and the 
growth of unemployment made the climate 
propitious for their return, and apparently 
they are out to take the fullest possible ad- 
vantage of the situation. The fact that the 
Kremlin once more feels strong enough to 
rattle the sword probably gave American 
Communists renewed inspiration, too. At 
any rate, local unions and Brotherhood 
councils should be on guard against the 
emerging belligerence of Red elements. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



There is only one effective way to deal with those 
who follow and promote the Communist line. It in- 
volves getting greater rank-and-file attendance at 
union meetings. It requires dedicated Americans to 
out-sit Communists in union meetings so that they 
cannot pass legislation geared to their particular ends 
after a tired and disgusted membership, worn out by 
endless oratory, departs for home. It requires alert- 
ness on the part of union officers to recognize the 
ever-changing Communist line and question the mo- 
tives of those who follow it slavishly. 

These techniques worked before World War 
II, and they will work again if enough members 
recognize the seriousness of the Communist 
threat. 



BILL BELTZ WAS "MR. ALASKA" 

If any individual earned the name "Mr. Alaska", 
that man was William E. Beltz. Brother Beltz's fore- 
bears were living in Alaska even before the white 
nan discovered the North American continent, for 
lie happened to be an Eskimo. His untimely death 
ast month dealt the aspirations of our newest state 
serious blow. 

At the time of his death, Brother Beltz was 
the president of the Alaska State Senate. He was 
one of the leaders in the fight to achieve state- 
hood for Alaska, and it was he who designed 
the official flag of our northernmost state. 
But in addition to being a civic leader, Brother 
Beltz was a dedicated union man and a long-time 
nember of our Brotherhood. He devoted a great 
leal of time and energy to building up the Alaskan 
abor movement in general and our Brotherhood in 
^articular. His shoes will be very difficult to fill. 

The life of William Beltz is a saga of 
courage and concern for humanity. Further- 
more, it stands as prime evidence that ability 
is no respecter of race, class or creed. 
Alaska will miss him, and so will the entire 
cause of greater dignity for all human 
beings. 



PASSING THE BUCK 
IS A HUMAN FAILING 

It is a human failing, in the face of crisis, when 
me's persona] conduct or job or reputation is in 
eopardy, to seize upon a convenient scapegoat. 

Where fires involving the loss of human life 
or highly valued property are concerned, the 
whipping boy most often seized upon is the 
product with which each of us is intimately con- 
cerned in earning our daily bread, wood. Every- 
one knows that wood will burn; therefore it is 
relatively easy to explain away deficiencies in 

FANUARY. 1961 



firefighting techniques, in housekeeping practices, 
in safety devices and rules, and resulting con- 
fusions and jurisdictional conflicts by pinning the 
blame on the presence of wood. 

This is precisely what happened when 49 lives were 
lost and millions of dollars worth of damage were 
sustained in the tragic fire aboard the USS Constella- 
tion at Brooklyn Navy Yard. 

No one deplores the loss of life more than we do, 
since we lost several brothers there, but the facts, as 
they have gradually emerged during the course of 
hearings by the Navy Board of Inquiry, fail to support 
the snap judgments offered to the press by both 
civilian and Navy officials. 

Despite New York Fire Commissioner Cavanagh's 
glib explanation that the fire went out of control 
because of the extensive use of wood scaffolding 
throughout the ship, it has come to light that the 
scaffolding framework was of steel and only the walk- 
ing planks were of wood. Despite the statement by 
Rear Admiral Charles E. Wellborn that he would 
recommend that steel scaffolding be used for all 
future Naval construction, it has developed that the 
steel scaffolding framework collapsed in the heat and 
dumped the planks onto the deck where the fire had 
been confined. The charges and counter charges flying 
back and forth between the Navy and the New York 
City Fire Department in the face of facts involve fire- 
fighting practices, conflicting jurisdictions, and irre- 
sponsible housekeeping and safety rules . . . not wood 
planks. 

Secretary of the Navy, William B. Franke, struck 
a note of sanity in these proceedings in his White 
House press conference, December 21. when he said: 

"/ think there is general public miscon- 
ception of scaffolding. Now the scaffolding 
is of steel. It's the walkways that are of 
wood, and these have been historically made 
of wood for many reasons: wood is safer, 
and less apt to slip on scaffolding. Another 
reason is that it can be cut to the proper 
dimensions. They can be nailed. Both naval 
and private shipyards have used them from 
time immemorial." 

Although the Secretary went on to point out that 
aluminum scaffolding burns more intensely than wood. 
he failed to mention that metal in scaffolding repre- 
sents a constant threat to workmen because of its 
electrical conductivity. A downed wire on a network 
of steel scaffolding can cost as many lives in a 
twinkling as the Constellation fire did in the eighteen 
hours it burned. 

We believe that the investigation will disclose that 
the use of wood planking was sound and that the 
practice will be continued. In the meanwhile we hope 
that officials in responsible positions will approach 
crises with responsibility commensurate with those 
positions and refrain from public statements which do 
irreparable harm to any material and to the future 
employment prospects of the men who work with that 
material. 



19 




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20 



THE CARPENTER 






&uctye£Btittfc 



America's women are doing battle 
against an insidious foe: "the rising 
cost of living." 

For weapons, the ladies have their 
shopping carts, the power of selectivity 
— and some help from the retailers 
from whom they buy their food. This 
help comes in the form of shopping 
tips put together by the Consumer 
Advisory Committee of the National 
Association of Food Chains. 

What makes weapons out of shop- 
ping carts and selectivity? Well, what 
most people use as a measure of the 
"rising cost of living" is the govern- 
ment's Consumer Price Index. The 
catch is that for its food index the 
government prices only 80-odd items 
a week. Shoppers in the modern 
supermarket are offered 4.000 to 6,000 
items and often more from which to 
choose. 

So with all this selectivity a wise 
shopper can outwit the Index every 
time by buying things that are season- 
ally abundant and thus lower in price. 
So in a month in which the govern- 
ment says food prices went up, some 
shoppers' food bills actually may go 
down. 

It's all in how they wield that other 
weapon, the shopping cart. 

Victory starts with meal planning — 
that's the first on the list of shopping 
tips. Remember, however, no savings 
are worthwhile if they skimp on nutri- 



tion. So make sure meals are well- 
balanced. Knowing the basic food 
groups helps. 

First is the Milk Group. Children 
need one quart a day; adults a pint or 
more. Cheese and ice cream can 
substitute for some of the milk. Meat 
is another group. Requirements are 
two or more servings a day of beef. 
veal. Iamb, pork, poultry, fish or eggs. 
with dry peas, beans or nuts as substi- 
tutes. 

Next group is Fruit-Vegetable. To 
keep healthy you need four or more 
servings including a dark-green or 
deep-yellow vegetable every other day. 
Also, a citrus fruit or other Vitamin 
C source daily and other fruits and 
vegetables including potatoes. 

Last is the Bread-Cereal Group. 
Four or more servings a day — whole 
grain, enriched or restored — are par 
for the course. 

Good nutrition depends on knowl- 
edge, so know what you eat. Then 
you can interchange foods with equal 
nutritive values. Example: non-fat 
dry milk gives the same amount of 
calcium as fresh milk — at substantial 
savings. 

Faithful reading of the weekly food 
ads is the best way to keep abreast of 
supply, quality and prices of foods. 
It's also a good way to learn what 
foods are in season and how to com- 
pare brands and grades for the best 
value. 



21 



Two important savings axioms no 
housewife should forget are: write out 
your meal plans ahead of time — to 
figure costs — and keep your meal flex- 
ible so you can substitute a food bar- 
gain that might pop up unexpectedly. 
Breaking down food purchases to a 
price per serving basis, by the way, 
also shows you where you can cut 
costs. 

If a homemaker has a part-time job, 
then her time is money, too. That 
means that saving time by use of 
ready-to-serve foods might mean a 
greater dollar saving in the family 
budget than less expensive prepare- 
yourself items. But whatever the con- 
tent of meals, it's always wise to 
prepare foods that everyone will eat — 
and finish. 

Knowledge is also the key to success 
in the actual shopping. Since meat is 
a major item, you have to know the 
basic rules of meat buying and what 
cuts to use for what purposes. 

Ask Questions 

Learn the government grades and 
what brands your market uses so you 
can judge quality. Read the labels 
when you shop in self-service depart- 
ments. Don't be afraid to ask ques- 
tions and get your hands on any 
explanatory booklets you can. Many 
are available free from meat-packing 
companies, supermarkets — even the 
government. 

Learn the best uses for each food 
and you're putting dollars in your 
pocket. Example: if you're making 
spaghetti sauce, using canned, broken 
tomatoes or tomato puree is thriftier 
than using canned fancy whole toma- 
toes. There is no nutritional difference 
between brown and white eggs, and 
medium size eggs for recipes are just 
as good and save money. 

One excellent way to standardize 
your food quality is to buy by govern- 
ment grades. And while you're read- 
ing the labels, don't forget to study the 
weight, size, number of servings, cup 
measure and ingredients of the food. 
Often the packaging, if not downright 
dishonest, is certainly misleading. 
Check the amounts when you are 
comparing price. 

Season affects prices, so when it 
comes to food buying the wise house- 
wife literally keeps her eye on the 
weather. In other words, when sea- 
sonal foods are at their peak they 
usually represent best buys — like 
citrus fruits, root vegetables, cabbage 
in winter and berries, plums, peaches 
in summer. 

Other shopping tips: buy in large 
quantities when possible to take ad- 



ACceproHtY 



UNfON MAOe GOODS AND S5KVtceS 



UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPT., AFL CIO 



vantage of bargain prices . . . keep an 
emergency supply of food to save 
dollars wasted on hasty buying ... 
take advantage of special introductory 
offers if you can use them. 

Make sure you store foods properly 
and use all you buy. If you let half 
your onion purchase spoil, you're 
doubling the price. If you don't use 
all the celery you're adding to its 
price and letting salad greens wilt 
away is a waste of vitamins. 

Of course, cooking the food right 
is also important to save money. The 
food industry spends a fortune work- 
ing out those recipes on the label. 
Changing them at random means you 
may waste food or spoil it. 

When different recipes are desirable, 
use of tested recipes from any source 



avoids the pitfall of costly mistakes. 
Recipe ingenuity and cooking skill, by 
the way, are excellent means of keep- 
ing prices down. For one thing, you 
can cook thriftier cuts of meat and 
make them attractive. Remember, 
there's no such thing as tough meat. 
Tenderness depends on the cook's 
know-how. 

Final cooking tips: cook to retain 
the food value of what you bought. 
Use low heat, small amounts of water, 
don't overcook. And when in doubt, 
check before you cook. It not only 
avoids costly mistakes — it saves time. 

That's the plan for winning the 
battle against the "rising cost of liv- 
ing." Any housewife can follow the 
steps. And when she does, she'll find 
out the real truth of the matter — that 
food is still her greatest bargain. 



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22 



THE CARPENTER 



OFFICIAL 
INFORMATION 




5ENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



3ENERAL PRESIDENT 
A. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



IRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

ohn R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



IECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

5. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



ENERAL SECRETARY 

. E. Livingston 
Carpenters" Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



general treasurer 

'eter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District. Charles Johnson. Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District. Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place. Springfield. New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schw ajlzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14. Ohio 

Fourth District. Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place. St. Paul 16. Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4. Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66. Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District. Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12. Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengolgh 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver. B. C. 



M. A. Hltcheson. Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



The Constitution and Laws of the United 
3rotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America spell out in detail the responsibilities 

f the Member, the Financial Secretary, and 
he General Secretary regarding a member's 
lues. Every member should understand these 

rovisions thoroughly, since it is his member- 
ship, his right to benefits, and his union record 
hat are at stake when dues are not kept paid 



in accordance with the Constitutional terms 
laid down by successive conventions. 

Dues are a prime obligation of union mem- 
bership. The ultimate responsibility for keep- 
ing dues properly paid — and thereby remain- 
ing in benefit standing — rests with the individ- 
ual member. The initiative must come from 
him. Let us keep our dues paid up properly 
and thereby avoid misunderstandings and the 
risk of arrearage and suspension. 



IANUARY. 1961 



23 



Oregon Report on Wood Fire 
Urged as "Recommended Reading 



RECOMMENDED reading for the 
Navy brass that blamed the 
combustability of wood for the tragic 
fire aboard the U.S.S. Constellation 
ought to be the report made by the 
Oregon State Department of Voca- 
tional Training on the results of a fire 
test made at Gervais, Oregon. 

An antiquated school house at Ger- 
vais was deliberately burned down as 
a part of the fire test. 

Object of the deliberate burning of 
the old two-story school, recently re- 
placed by a new structure, was to test 
building materials, alarm systems and 
new fire suppression techniques under 
state supervision. 

To test the unusual qualities of dry, 
untreated redwood lumber as a fire- 
wall, because of its low flame spread 
and high insulation qualities, Georgia- 
Pacific Plywood constructed a small 
redwood "safe" into which was placed 
a letter on ordinary office stationery. 

Despite sustained flames that leveled 
the building and roared 60 feet into 
the air, the letter came through un- 
scathed and its protective wooden 
"safe" was only slightly charred, dem- 
onstrating a long-known but little un- 
derstood prime quality of redwood. 

The unexpected story of how the 
"fireproof" letter, typed on highly- 




A school house burned down (see photo 
below) around this small redwood "safe" 
at Gervais, Oregon, but there was only 
a half-inch of char on the outside with 
three inches of unharmed dry and un- 
treated redwood still protecting the safe. 

flammable office stationery, survived 
a major school fire is detailed in the 
report. 

Before the fire was set, and while 
firemen and state fire officials held 
(Continued on page 32) 




One of the nation's most spectacular school fires of 1960 was this one set deliber- 
ately as part of Oregon's fire training program. Photo was made just before 
walls of building came crashing to earth. Program results are reported above. 




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24 



THE CARPENTER 




Veteran Retires 



Hiko Smith Honored in Rochester, Minn. 





A. partial view of the testimonial banquet in Rochester, Minn., honoring Hiko Smith, 
longtime business agent of L.U. 1382, Rochester, Minn. Mr. Smith has long been 
active in the Carpenter activities and in the Central Labor Union. Labor and 
management joined to honor him recently. Out of town guests coming to honor the 
retiring business agent included Neil Sherburne, State AFL-CIO secretary, St. Paul; 
Elmer Schafer. Duluth, Minn., representing the International; Leon Green, secretary, 
State Council of Carpenters, St. Paul; Walter Crammond, Central Labor L?nion, 
Minneapolis; David Roe, State Building & Construction Trades Council, Minneapolis, 
jnd three building trades representatives: Nick Gretz, Fairbault, Mollis Larson and 
Floyd Baker, both of Red Wing. Testimonial was highlight of Smith's long career. 



James D. "Jimmy" Warren, a 39-year 
member of L.U. 162, San Mateo. Calif- 
holds a camera just presented to him 
upon his retirement. He served his local 
33 years as trustee and for the last five 
years was financial secretary. The 79-year- 
old Carpenter veteran has seen the work 
week change from the six-day 10 hours a 
day schedule to the present 40 hours. He 
joined the Brotherhood in Boston De- 
cember 2, 1902 and came West in 1903 
and was affiliated with Locals 36, Oak- 
land, 483, San Francisco and 1408, Red- 
wood City. He has been in San Mateo 
since 1921. He and his wife, married 
51 years, now plan a trip to Canada. 



VQU'te WAV_AHeAD... 




... wtr» UK/on msec / 

^H;ii.i;iri:n»iji.mi'jmi:H.]«.iiJM,HBjr.M 



Capital Council Graduates 34 in Class of '60 




Graduating apprentices of the Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship Program, Washington, D. C, are shown at the 1960 banquet. 



Erie Honors Veterans, Apprentices 




Fifty and 25-year members of L.U. 81, Erie, Pa., were honored 
at a banquet last fall. Front row, left to right. General 
Representative C. M. Slinker; the four 50-year members, Fritz 
Lange, Stephen U. Scheineck, Carl Eger and Frank Kauffman 
and Past President Lewis J. Hemmis. Second row, 25-year 
members, William Sunnucks, Art Turner, Carl I 'lit. J. H. 
Myers, Fred Uhlman, Leo W. Kirsch, Frank DiRenzo, Edward 
Burgman, Lynn Ellis and Harry Hybel. Third row, additional 
25-year members, John W. Martin, Vernon Wiser, George 



Ricci, T. V. Davis, Ben P. Kuhn, J. W. Kerr, Harold Irvin, 
George Hoornstra. Earl Baldwin and Conrad Blodine. Not 
present when photo was taken included Walter Ciukaij, Clar- 
ence Copeland, T. J. Cunningham, Ralph Emery, John A. 
Engell, Phillip Ester, J. Bernard Farley, W. D. Fresch, Bert 
Johnson, Emil Kunemann, George E. Lohse, William Mc- 
Colloch, Arthur Rose, W. C. Sherick, F. J. Wagner, Melvin 
Wells and Carl Whilhelm. Members of the local union turned 
out in force to honor the veteran members. 




Chairman Albert Allen of the L.U. 81 Apprentice Training Harvey J. Lindy, and Gerald Smith. At extreme right is 
Program is at extreme left; he presented certificates of com- E. Lowman Director of State Apprentice Programs. The local 
pletion to Apprentices (from left) Lucas Burt, Richard Kuse, is proud of its fine apprentice training program. 



Florida 
Apprenticeship Winners 

The top three winners in the first state- 
wide apprenticeship contest in Florida 
pose with their trophies at the banquet 
of the Annual Southern State Appren- 
ticeship Conference. Left to right are 
Richard Wade, West Palm Beach, second 
place winner; Louis Buti, Tampa, first 
prize winner, and Donald Coumbe, 
Miami, third place winner. More than 
20 other apprentices from 10 Southern 
States were honored at the conference 
banquet in Miami when they received 
the William F. Patterson award from 
W. C. Christensen, Director of Appren- 
tice Training, Department of Labor, 
Washington, D. C. The 1961 confer- 
ence will be held in Jackson, Miss. 




26 



THE CARPENTER 




Nova Scotia Country 
Praised As Deer Area 



! 



Sport of Deer Hunting 
Called Top Attraction 




BF*-^ "4l* ' '- 



i *****Sfe-- 



Victor Kerr of Tannersville, New 
Vork. a member of Local 1 175 out of 
Kingston, contends that the number 
jf big-game on the ground, or in the 
: reezer. is of secondary importance. 

He believes that if the hunting trip 
vas an adventure in pleasant relaxa- 
ion. it was a big success — regardless 
jf the amount of tangible evidence 
hat the trip may have yielded. 

Here's Vic posing beside a nice 
juck he downed out of Tannersville — 
he second one in 30 years of hunting! 

J eccary Hunt by Phoenix 
Group Called Successful 

One of the strangest and least- 
mown animals in the United States is 
he peccary, otherwise known as the 
avelina. 

But it's a well-known target for the 
)ig-game rifle of Dale M. Baker of 
'hoenix. Arizona, a member of Local 
089. and his wife. 

The Bakers, using 30-06 rifles, hunt 
he Pinal mountains around Globe, 
■\rizona. Friends of the Bakers, hus- 
>ands and wives, join in the hunt, 
decent stalk thereabouts netted eight 
avelina and two coyote. 

The proceeds from the hunt are 
tored away for a while, then the 
jroup takes off for the hills on a pot- 
uck dinner, main course of the fixin's 
)eing barbecued pig — sort of a "pec- 
an' picnic." 



The peccary, we note, is a relative 
of the pig family and its range is 
confined in the United States to 
practically all the brush country of 
southwest Texas, the southeastern 
quarter of Arizona and a small popu- 
lation in the sandy uplands of south- 
ern New Mexico. 

Last count of javelina by the game 
authorities showed an estimated 
1 1 6.000 in the aforementioned areas. 

The Bakers and their friends get 
their share. 

Pronghorn Species Saved 
by Proper Management 

A little more than 35 years ago it 
was feared that the pronghorn ante- 
lope would eventually pass from the 
wildlife scene in America, becoming 
an extinct species like the moorhen 
and passenger pigeon, or perhaps the 
closely-guarded, near extinct American 
bison and grizzly bear. 

In 1924. a census revealed that 
there were but 26,000 antelope in this 
country. Since that time, with sound 




management protection from preda- 
tors and over-shooting, the pronghorn 
has made an amazing recoverv . 

Latest inventory records at our dis- 
posal show a count of 175.000 of 
these swift, big-game animals. 

That's good news, for the prong- 
horn is an invaluable gem in Amer- 
ica's big-game tiara. It is the tleetest 
of all North American big-game ani- 
mals. They have been clocked at 
speeds up to seventy miles per hour! 




Thomas Hatt of Halifax, a mem- 
ber of Local 83, says the Cape Breton 
country of Nova Scotia is a deer 
hunter's paradise. Tom and his son 
go hunting together and usually man- 
age to put some venison on the table. 

Here's a photo of the Hatt huntin' 
team with one of the two bucks they 
nailed on the Cape. 

Both were seven-pointers. 

Yellow Gains Favor 
as Safety "Topper" 

What color of "topper" should a 
hunter wear to get the fullest protec- 
tion in the woods? 

Back in 1956, everybody it seemed 
wore red, but in that year a series of 
"color discernibility" tests in Califor- 
nia proved that yellow was a much 
better warning color than the time- 
honored red. 

The outdoor magazines, state game 
agencies and wildlife columnists 
played this up big (and I was one of 
them). From then on the yellow hat 
as a huntin' lid gained favor until now 
it appears that 50 percent of the nim- 
rods wear red. the other half yellow. 

Now don't rush out and get a 
yellow topper; not yet. 'cause accord- 
ing to an exhaustive series of tests con- 
ducted by the U.S. Army in Massa- 
chusetts, both yellow and red will ha\e 
to take a back seat to a newcomer 
color, a fluorescent called "blaze 
orange." 

These latest tests took place under 
the watchful eyes of the Massachusetts 
Division of Fish and Game. In at- 
tendance was Frank Woolner. writer 
for Field and Stream magazine. Frank 
said it was really an eerie sight to see 
an orange cap come floating down the 



ANVARY. 1961 



27 



mountainside in deep dusk — with the 
wearer completely invisible! 

Over 1,000 soldiers participated in 
these tests, shooting at targets under 
typical hunting conditions. Six colors 
were used, including brilliant red, 
yellow and four other fluorescents. 

When the final score was tabulated, 
it was found that yellow and red were 
the least-safe colors and "blaze 
orange" most discernible. 

As this writing man cares little for 
a hunting hat, I'm looking around for 
a unique type of hair dye — "blaze 
orange." 

Good Deed to Deer is 
Repaid by Return Visit 

Seems like Floyd Dowell, California 
Fish and Game Warden, gave a hand- 
out of grapes and bread to a deer 
named Daisy, a little doe that makes 
her home at the Longbell Forest 
Guard Station. 

After the feeding session, Floyd 
went about his business at the station. 

When he returned to the car, there 
was Daisy — all crunched up in the 
front seat! 

The warden had quite a time re- 
moving the animal, and he admits that 
any points gained with the free hand- 
out were lost in an assortment of 
angry grunts and reverse English. 

Some consolation was felt inasmuch 
as there was no damage to the car. 

"Think how this episode would look 
on an accident report," remarked 
Dowell. 



Carpenter Recalls the 
"Good Old Days" in Maine 



. IFTMERESNOUNIOM/ 

aftBei-ooN'TBuyiT.' 






i i * 




Herbert L. Johnson, a retired mem- 
ber of the Carpenter's Union, Local 
658, recalls the "good old days" of 
past hunts. 

Herb lives in Millinocket, Maine, 
not very far from where this photo 
was taken — over 20 years ago. He's 
shown here with two of his hunting 
pals and they all got their deer in one 
day from the timbered country around 
the lower end of Millinocket lake at a 
camp called "Suitsers." 

The fourth man in their party got 
his deer the next day ... all nice 
bucks. 

Title of the following item might 
well be called "Deer Me!" or "Woe 
is the Doe." 



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Enclosed find check . .Money order . . Send COD 




While on the subject of deer I'm re- 
minded of an experience had by nrj 
good friend Madison Smith, presiden 
of the Portland Chapter of the IWLA 

Madison, while stalking around th( 
Seneca country of Oregon, emergec 
through a thicket and saw a forked 
horn standing motionless, head bowed 
drinking from a pool of water. 

Dumbstruck by the apparent un- 
concern of the deer for his obvious 
presence he approached within arm's 
length of the animal. Still the deer 
showed no concern. 

Looking about him, Madison soon 
deducted what the answer to the 
enigma might be. The ground was 
torn up considerably and the buck had 
a gaping hole in its side. It had ap- 
parently been in combat with another 
buck and was too exhausted by the 
ordeal to care about anything. 

Madison, with one stone, killed the 
buck, a crack over the head that 
finished him off without a shot. 

Extra Length Waders Seem 
to be Gaining in Favor 

The use of waders, arm-pit type, are 
becoming increasingly popular among 
outdoorsmen. Here are a few random 
thoughts about this gear that we're 
passing along for what it's worth: 

Heavy wool socks should be worn 
with all waders. With the stocking- 
foot type, a pair on the inside and a 
pair on the outside. The pair on the 
inside protects your feet and the pair 
on the outside protects the wader- 
material from chafing. 

If you are one who will be retiring 
your waders after the warm-weather 
fishing season, we'd recommend that 
you hang them in a cool, dry place 
away from the sunlight. Sun destroys 
rubber. 

To dry your waders, turn inside out. 
If inside boot linings are not thor- 
oughly dry, they will mildew and rot, 
causing rubber to give way. 

When storing for winter, stuff 
waders with paper and hang by top. 
Keep away from heat. 



rKorecT vouk&gcf 




WITH THZ UNION 04850 , 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




This column is devoted to introducing 
icw developments in materials and prod- 
icts to our members. The articles are 
resented merely to inform our readers, 
nd their publication is not to be con- 
trued as an indorsement, since all the 
iformation is based on claims made by 
he makers. Those interested in obtain- 
'ig further details regarding any product 
re requested to write to the company 
ather than to THE CARPENTER or 
he General Office. 

Portable Oxygen Kit 

A new, life-saving. low-cost portable 
xygen kit is now available to provide 
mergency treatment for victims of heart 
ttacks, accidents, exertion, drowning, 
r respiratory illness. The kit is manu- 
ictured by the Medical Division of The 
lurdette Oxygen Co.. 3300 Lakeside 
L.ve., Cleveland. Ohio. It was developed 
jr use by laymen to provide stand-by, 
fe-saving emergency equipment for in- 
ustrial plants, mines, construction proj- 
cts. boats, municipalities, schools, 



1~\ 




ffices, police and fire departments, 
med services, resorts, hotels, motels, 
eaters, stores, stadiums, swimming 
ools. athletic departments, recreational 
icilities. or carrying in the car. 
The unit is a precise, scientifically de- 
Hoped piece of equipment, simplified 
) the extent that anyone can operate it. 
mergency oxygen can be administered 
ost instantaneously simply by opening 
e cylinder valve, turning the flow ad- 
Iment knob, and placing the mask on 
patient's face. In addition to its use- 
llness for victims of heart attacks, the 
it can also be used to revive those 
tffering from shock, fainting spells, 
ithma, etc. Write the company for 
terature. 

ANUARY, 1961 



Still Another New 
Saw Horse Leg 

The Grip-Tite Manufacturing Co.. Inc., 
Winterset, Iowa, has announced the im- 
mediate availability of Port-A-Legs, a 
new, self-locking, all steel, riveted, fold- 
ing sawhorse leg that costs no more than 
wood construction. The unique, bridge- 
like design and high-strength construction I 
of Port-A-Legs eliminates wobble and 
.the tendency of many horses to loosen 
and sag after continuous use, it is 
claimed. Port-A-Legs are made of 16- 




gauge steel, are self-locking, and support 
over 1.000 pounds. Other features are — 
legs extend to 18 inches and are offset 
for stability; 42 square inch contact area 
in the steel jaws; bright red enamel finish 
for high visibility; 24 inch working height 
with a 2 x 4 crosspiece. or additional 
height may be gained by using 2x6 
or 2 x 8 crosspiece; any length crosspiece 
may be used to fit sawhorse to particular 
job requirement. For further informa- 
tion, write to Grip-Tite Manufacturing 
Co., Inc., Box 111. Winterset. Iowa. 

Two-way Level Now Available 

Lok Products Company. Glendale, 
Calif., is introducing a new two-way 
builder's level, the Lok Level, that plumbs 
two surfaces at once, offering consider- 
able savings in time for construction 
workers, bricklayers and carpenters. 
Moreover, in addition to plumbing two 
surfaces simultaneously, the Lok Level 
will also act as a facing straight-edge 
when used in the leveling position as in 
brick work, for example, claim the man- 
ufacturers. 

Made of extruded aluminum with 
braces of brass bridging, the Lok Level 
is extremely lightweight and well bal- 
anced for ease of handling. Simple ad- 
justment and replacing of bubbles insure 
long instrument life. For further infor- 
mation, write to Lok Products Company, 
1729 Hillside Drive, Glendale. Calif. 




i make $ 5 00 an hour 

CASH PROFIT 

IN MY RETIREMENT 



BUSINESS 



— Grover Squires 





When you retire be sure of good 
steady cash income with your 
own COMPLETE SHARPENING 
SHOP . . . Grind saws, knives, 
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29 





3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores up to 5 times faster in any wood, at any 
angle. Sizes Vi" to 1", $.75 each. Sizes TVs" to 
IY2", $1.25 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /g" to 
3". Only $4.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5 / 8 " to 1 3 / 4 ". Only $3.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes V4" to 
1 V2". As low as $1.05 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for SO ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Gel 
Strait-tine Micro-Fine chalk refills and /i?^\ 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 

IRWIN w h n r 

every bit as good as the name 



COOKFORTHS 
UN/ON 
CA860 

NEVER BEFORE SO MANY 
FEATURES ... SO MANY "EXTRAS"! 



sensational Nj E^V 

&/0714. WOOD 
FOLDING RULES 



&/OVZ4. "C?OZL£> TIP' 
6 ft. EXTENSION RULE 

f. FREE! Rule holster with 
belt clip. 

2. EASY TO READ! Marked 
in inches, plus feet-and- 
inches. Stud marks 
every 16". "Flags" 
every foot. 

3. BUILT-IN GRADUATED 
BRASS TIPS at both ends. 

4. BRASS EXTENSION, grad- 
uated for inside 
measurement. 
(Models X40 and 
X40F only). 

5. MANUFACTURER'S 
REPLACEMENT AND 
REPAIR SERVICE! 

Also available: STANDARD 
"SILVER TIP" Rule, $1.79 





BRASS NAMEPLATE 
plus set of "A to Z" 
metalized initials with 
all rules. 



New Plywood Saw to 
Minimize Tearing 

Simonds Saw & Steel Company, one 
of the nation's largest manufacturers of 
saws, announces the development of an 
all-new Plywood Combination Saw de- 
signed to eliminate both top and bottom 
splinters and slivers. This new saw, 
known as the No. 66, is made for hand 
feed use on table, radial arm and swing 
saws in furniture plants, cabinet shops, 




sash and door plants, lumber yards and 
construction projects. "The new No. 66 
Saw," says a Simonds spokesman, "trims 
or cuts off plywood smoothly across the 
grain without splinters or slivers . . . 
it also rips and miters plywood so 
smoothly that no further finishing is 
necessary." For descriptive literature, 
write G. C. Heaslip, Sutherland-Abbott, 
581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

To Help Miter Plastics Cleanly 

A perfect mitered edge for laminated 
plastics, shown on the left in the picture, 
is possible for the first time with a new 
method that eliminates the exposed dark 
line or T-molding that formerly char- 
acterized the finished edge or corner. 
Here are the simple steps required: 




1. 



&/0424. 



Factories at: Elizabeth, N. J. 
RULE CO. & Montreal, Quebec 



Edge of laminated plastic table top 
is beveled by router held at angle 
in mitering attachment. 
Matching strip or skirt is beveled 
in same manner. 

Glue is applied to both surfaces 
which are held in place with cello- 
phane tape strips until dry. 
Light sanding may be needed to 
dull sharp edges produced by 
mitered joint. 
The new technique results in a stronger 
joint by making a concave cut on both 
surfaces, providing more contact area for 
gluing, the maker claims. It is also 



2. 



4. 



cleaner than previous mitering operations 
in that it requires no extensive sanding 
or finishing. Further information can be 
obtained from Porter-Cable, 101 Seneca 
St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



To Sharpen Chisels With a 
Drill 

Shown powered with a Va " drill is the 
handy gadget for sharpening chisels in 
seconds, wet or dry. A guide on the 
sliding clamp holds the tool firmly in line 
to produce a perfect cutting edge at right 
angles to the center line of the tool. It 
is adjustable to any angle. The abrasive 
wheel is concave with the grinding sur- 
face only on the outer rim for faster 
grinding with a minimum amount of 
heat. Invented and promoted by one of 




our own members. Write: Easy Tool 
Company, Box 41, Eugene, Ore. 



A Cheap Scriber 

A cheap new Scriber is on the market 
for linoleum layers and others who have 
to fit floor coverings or similar materials 
into odd-shaped places. The makei 
claims that obstructions and fancy cutting 
problems such as around pipes, cabinets, 
door sills, etc., are simply and quickly 
overcome in a very satisfactory mannei 
by the use of the Scriber without remov- 
ing any molding or other treatment. Foi 
additional information, write to Charles 
Machine Company, P. O. Box 63-82B, 
Springfield, N. J. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 




THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and pub- 
lished. Send along your pet trick for 
making a job easier. It can earn you 
five dollars and the gratitude of your 
fellow members. Include a rough sketch 
from which we can make a drawing. 



No Sweat Saw Oiler 

Certainly every carpenter worth his 
salt knows the importance of keeping 
hand saws well oiled both to protect 




Saturate felt 
with oil here 



them from rust and to make cutting 
easier. However, this is a job that 
sometimes gets neglected because find- 
ing a suitable rag and oil can is not 
always convenient. 

Here is a simple device that can 
make the job of properly caring for 
saws a simple one. Take a piece of 
2x4 about a foot long and cut a slot 
in it about half an inch wide. Line 
both sides of the slot with pieces of 
felt. (It will be necessary to lap the 
felt over on both ends to do the nail- 
ing.) Drill some half-inch holes into 
the felt from the sides. Saturate the 
felt lining of the slot with oil applied 
through the holes. 

When you nail this oiler to your 
bench it is a simple matter to pull the 
saw through it a couple of times at the 
end of the day's work; no sweat, no 
muss, no bother. Note drawing for 
foil details. 

To Make Doweling Simple 

Accurate doweling — especially 
when odd-shaped pieces of wood are 
involved — can be a frustrating and 
time-consuming job. Here is a simple 
method that can hardlv fail. 



Into one of the pieces to be doweled 
drive brads to locate the exact posi- 
tions of the dowel holes. Clip off the 
heads of the brads about one eighth 
inch from the surface. This will leave 
the brads with relatively sharp points. 
Butt the two pieces of wood together 
carefully and tap the end of either 
piece smartly. 

Cheap Rubber Mallet 

There is nothing original about this 
idea but it is a handy one to know 
when working on material that must 
not be dented or marred. 




Rubber 
Crutch Tip 



A crutch tip slipped over the head 
of a claw hammer makes an excellent 
rubber mallet. The crutch tip is cheap, 
it takes up very little room in the tool 
box yet it does a good job when a 
rubber mallet is not available. 



Books That Will Help You 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 il.. covering 
general house carpentry, estimating, making win- 
dow and door frames, heavy timber framing, 
trusses, power tools, and other important building 
subjects. $3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTION ARY.— Has 380 
p. 070 il., and about 7,000 building trades terms 
and expressions. Defines terms and gives many 
practical building suggestions. Tou need this 
book. $4.00. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool explained. One of the top-best of my books 
— you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 iL 
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THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p.. 498 il.. 
covering all important steel-square problems. The 
most practical book on the square sold today. 
Price $3.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 il., covering 
several of the most important branches of car- 
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building. $3.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il.. covering 
every branch of roof framing. The best roof 
framing book on the market. Other problems, 
including saw filinir. $3.50. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
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the price of the book. Has 256 p. and 680 il. 
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You can't go wrong if you buy this whole stf. 
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CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION.— Has 163 p.. 439 
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reinforcing, scaffolding and other temporary con- 
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$3.50. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Onlv $1.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Revised, illus- 
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THE WAILING PLACE.— This book is made up 
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Illustrated by the famed artist. Will Rapport. 
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FREE.— With 8 books, THE WAILING PLACE 
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With 2 books, THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00. 
ami with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Carrying charges paid only when full 
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JANUARY, 1961 



31 




The brad ends will mark the exact 
center location of dowel holes in the 
second piece. Pull out the brads from 
the first piece and you have the match- 
ing locations in it. Drill out the holes 
to the size of your dowels and you 
should be in business. 

Makeshift Pipe Wrench 
That Works 

Tightening or loosening a piece of 
pipe is a simple matter if you have 
a pipe wrench. But most of us some- 
time or other find ourselves needing to 
tighten or loosen a piece of pipe with- 
out the proper type wrench handy. 

Here is a trick that can often get 



Leather or 
■flexible material, 




the job done without a trip to locate 
a pipe wrench. 

Wrap a piece of strong leather (or 
similar material) around the pipe. 
Then take a strong pair of pliers and 
clamp on to the end pieces of leather 
as close to the pipe as possible. Twist 
in the direction you want the pipe to 
turn. This gives you enough leverage 
to accomplish your mission in most 
instances. 

Don't Throw Away Your 
Old Nail Set 

Nail sets have a habit of breaking 
off or wearing out. Either way results 
can be exaspera- 
ting when a new 
one is not avail- 
able. Here is a 
trick for putting 
old nail sets back 
in good condi- 
tion. 

Take a medium 
mill file and lay 
it flat on a solid 
surface. Place the 
end of the nail 




set on the file just as though you were 
going to set a nail. Tap the set smart- 
ly with your hammer. Then give the 
set a quarter turn and tap again. Re- 
peat this a few times, then take a look 
at the results. Keep repeating the 
process until you have a nice knurled 
end on your set. 

If you work carefully enough you 
should wind up with a nail set that 
is good as new. 

To Splice Moulding 

The proverbial guy up the creek 
without a paddle is no worse off than 
the carpenter with moulding to splice 
but not miter box. Here is a gimmick 
that can get you off the hook. 

Back up two pieces of moulding. 
Miter them at what you estimate to 
be 45 degrees. Turn the two pieces 
and they should fit perfectly. Cut to 
length and that's that. 

Woodfire Report 

(Continued from page 24) 
tongue in cheek, the letter was placed 
in a two by two-foot "safe" made of 
untreated, kiln-dried redwood. 

Built to simulate a standard com- 
mercial building firewall of redwood 
2x4 lumber, nailed together in "crib" 
fashion with walls only 3% inches 
thick, the box was placed in the 
doomed building to determine value 
of such untreated dry lumber as a 
fire safety factor. 

Thermocouples to register both in- 
side and outside heat were attached 
under state supervision. Records were 
kept to determine flame spread, insu- 
lation value and general fire resistance 
of redwood, which has a naturally low 
resin content. 

The report, published by the fire 
training department of the Oregon 
state division of vocational education, 
contains thermocouple temperature 
readings compiled by the state fire 
marshal's office. They show that the 
building burned fiercely with tempera- 
tures outside the redwood box ranging 
between 1100 and 1300 degrees Fahr- 
enheit before the "safe" was recovered 
by firemen one hour and 20 minutes 
later, just as walls were collapsing 
around it. 

But official temperature readings in- 
side the redwood box did not top 100 
degrees at any time, and during the 
hottest part of the fire remained at a 
constant 75 degrees. 

The report also revealed that, de- 
spite length and heat of the "total 
loss" fire, the wooden box was charred 
only a maximum half inch deep, the 
char remained attached to the wood. 



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32 



THE CARPENTER 



Only Skil planes do surface planing, too! 



Every portable electric plane — except 
the Skil Model 100— has the motor 
mounted on the side. Since the hous- 
ing hangs below the cutter blade, these 
planes are limited to narrow edge work. 
But the Model 100 has its motor 
where it ought to be — on top of the 
tool, out of the way. This makes it a 
surface plane, too, that you can use 
for planing wide surfaces . . . for heavy 
stock removal prior to finish sanding 
. . . for surfacing plywood preparatory 
to gluing laminated plastic counter 
tops . . . for dressing down and shaping 



roof trusses . . . for antiquing opera- 
tions and dozens of other applications. 
The motor-on-top design also means 
better balance and handling. Fence 
removes for surfacing jobs, mounts on 
either side for edging work, adjusts 
45° left or right for beveling. Lever 
operated depth adjustment from 

to y 8 ". 

Ask your Skil distributor for a dem- 
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UNITED BROTHERHOOD Sf CARPENTERS AND 






^ELECTRIC TOOLS CAN BE DANGEROUS 



When Using Such Tools 



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make sure the tool is properly grounded. 



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check all cables frequently — especially at the socket and 



«-,^ at point of attachment to tool. 





never use more than one extension cord to reach poiver >. 
source. *VV* 



when changing attachments or making minor repairs or 
•y^l adjustments always disconnect tool at power source. 

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if extension cord must be used begin at tool and work 
toward poiver source, better to blow a fuse than suffer *\£* 
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rGWRiKENTER 





THE COVER 

Winter brings many scenes of beauty and this month's 
cover photograph captures some of that natural beauty 
while at the same time suggesting the exhilaration of 
the outdoor life in the snow country. The icicles add 
a striking accent to the general composition and the 
snowshoes suggest that the cabin is not only a colorful 
structure but a mighty fine place to be in as the mer- 
cury dips. 



<3£U£IP 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters And Joiners of America 



¥ F ever a President was inaugu- 
rated under adverse circum- 
stances, that President is John F. 
Kennedy. The weather failed to 
cooperate, the lecturn caught fire, 
and a great old poet could not read 
his lines. 

To top off the picture, the Federal 
Reserve Bank announced that the 
industrial production index dropped 
nearly two per cent during the 
nonth of December. It was the 
owest point hit by the index since 
:he steel strike of two years ago. 
The production figures that stood 
it 1 1 1 in January, 1960, were down 
o 103 by December. December 
egistered the fourth straight month- 
y decrease. 

Adding up all the events, Presi- 
lent Kennedy took over under cir- 
umstances that are anything but 
jropitious. But he has proved him- 
elf to be a determined, dedicated, 
ind capable man. The New Fron- 
iers he spoke of during his cam- 
aign he seems determined to push 
or with all the vigor at his com- 
nand. 

All of us sincerely join in hoping 
hat his tenure of office which began 
o inauspiciously will wind up in a 
•laze of glory. 



VOLUME LXXXI Peter Terzick, Editor NO. 2 

FEBRUARY, 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

4 The Tacoma Story 

Millwright Apprentice Units Available 
Brotherhood to Sponsor Safety Training Course 

11 Bob Roberts Honored 

14 Labor Wants Jobs, Not Reports (Canada) 
New Plywood Curtain Wall Developed 
Noise for News 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 

12 Editorials ' 

16 Progress Report 

19 In Memoriam 

20 Battle of the Budget 
22 Official Information 
24 Outdoor Meanderings 

28 Short-Cuts 

29 What's New 

31 Local Union News 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Chance of address cards on Form 3579-P should be sent to THE 
CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street. Indianapolis 4. Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N. E.. Washington 18. D. C. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20<* in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 




WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



POLITICS TOP NEWS Politics and legislation occupy the front page these days 
in Washington and the effect of these two interrelated operations is of the most 
profound importance to organized labor. We have a new National Administration 
which is not only new in office but different in politics from its immediate 
predecessor. 

The change of politics in the White House means a complete change in the 
Executive Departments. Thus we have ten new cabinet officers, all named by 
the President and holding office with the advice and consent of the Senate. 
We have numerous regulatory agencies and these will have some new membership 
as soon as the terms of incumbent Republicans expire. The turnover in politics 
will make a complete change in the political complexion, not only of the cabinet 
departments, but also of many of the regulatory and independent agencies. 

With this change comes not only authority, but responsibility and how 
that responsibility is exercised is a matter of considerable importance not 
only to the citizens at large, but especially to labor. Union people are under 
regulation directly by the Department of Labor and the National Labor Relations 
Board. And much of the welfare of labor is tied in with the way in which 
numerous other activities are governed — housing, for example, or transportation 
and reclamation. Politics can and will make a big difference. 

CABINET GETS ATTENTION The spotlight in Washington is on the new President 
first of all, but the strong beams of public attention shine also on the new 
members of the cabinet. The ten named appear to be exceptionally well qualified 
for their jobs. While we would not agree in every case with the choice made, we 
must realize that the President has the right to choose his official family 
since he is the head of the Executive Department and must accept responsibility 
for the conduct of public office in that branch of Government. 

All along the line the President seems to have chosen able men. The State 
Department which seriously needs strengthening has strong men at the top. This 
augurs well for the country since much of our current concern is whether we 
will keep plunging headlong in a thermonuclear arms race or will ponder our fate 
and try to work out solutions which will avoid international disaster. 

A strong cabinet is one of the basic essentials of the new Administration. 
And we wish President John F. Kennedy well in his choice of responsible execu- 
tives. 



INAUGURAL SPEECH The focal point of international attention on Inauguration 
Day was the address of the new President. Most of the speech was directed at 
international problems. Mr. Kennedy sounded a "trumpet summons" to wage "a 
struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war 
itself." The words of the President echoed the sentiments of many who yearn for 
peace and amity. But the speech was not weak. He said, "Let the word go forth 
from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed 
to a new generation of Americans — born in this century — tempered by war, dis- 
ciplined by a cold and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage — and unwilling 
to witness or permit to slow undoing of those human rights to which this nation 
has always been committed, and to which we are committed today. "Let every 
nation know, whether it wish us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear 
any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend or oppose any foe in order 
to assure the survival and success of liberty." 

These are ringing words. And the President seemed determined to see that 
they are implemented and to this sentiment all Americans can agree. 

2 THE CARPENTEI 



COALITION PROBLEMS The laboring people have been one of the chief victims of 
the coalition in Congress of conservative Democrats and conservative Republicans. 
On issues of great concern to labor and to the public welfare decisions have been 
made which are adverse in their effect. Example: the House Rules Committee was 
able to bottle up legislation which is of the utmost importance to labor. And 
this year unless the Rules Committee is liberalized, as seems probable under 
Speaker Sam Rayburn's program, vital issues will be sidetracked without ever 
getting to the floor. On the problem of legislation for better housing, aid to 
education, aid to depressed areas, tax reform or other items we will see no 
action unless the Rules Committee either is (a) liberalized or (b) has somehow 
magically reformed. 

In the Senate the story is a little different. Efforts were made on opening 
day to revise Rule 22 which would permit closing off debate on vote of a majority 
of the members whereas the rule now provides for a two-thirds vote. The rule was 
not changed; it was sent "for study" to committee and thus the liberals of both 
party lost the first round. But was it a complete loss? 

The two party leaders, Democratic Mike Mansfield, Mont., and Republican 
Everett Dirksen, 111., voted to send the matter to committee to avoid a serious 
quarrel at the outset of Congress. In the showdown vote the Senate was divided 
with 32 Democrats agreeing with Mansfield and 31 agreeing with Majority Whip 
Hubert Humphrey, Minn. And 15 Republicans voted with the Humphrey forces to 
revise. Fortunately there are both Democrats and Republicans who voted against 
immediate change who will be counted on to vote for an ultimate change. This 
may mean — we have our fingers crossed — that there is developing a liberal 
coalition in the Senate. This could mean a great deal toward enactment of 
New Frontier or other liberal legislation during the coming months. Or the 
matter might all be a fond hope or an illusion and we may still be back with 
strong anti-liberal forces very much in control of the situation. 



COMMITTEES ADD MEMBERS Committee memberships in Congress are of the utmost 
importance in the business of getting legislation through Congress. Aggressive, 
liberal leadership and membership on a committee can mean the difference between 
pushing legislation and in delaying it. 

The Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare has two new members, both 
Democratic. One is the short termer from Massachusetts, Benjamin A. Smith, 
handpicked by Mr. Kennedy to take the vacated Senate seat from that commonwealth. 
The other is Claiborne Pell, liberal from Rhode Island. We don't know too much 
about Senator Smith, but we do know that Senator Pell, while one of the younger 
crowd, will make a fine addition to this important committee and labor can 
count itself lucky that Pell was selected for this post. 

The Senate Public Works Committee has three new members. On the G.O.P. 
side is J. Caleb Boggs from Delaware who won much labor support and is regarded 
as an eminently fair legislator. The other two are Democrats: Senator Smith of 
Massachusetts, noted above, and the liberal and aggressive Lee Metcalf, "promoted" 
from the House to the Senate, succeeding the venerable James Murray. 

The Banking and Currency Committee of the Senate has three freshman Senators 
as additions to its roster and all are Democrats: Edward V. Long, Mo., Maurine 
Neuberger, Ore., and William A. Blakely, Tex. This committee has jurisdiction 
over legislation in the Housing field. Mrs. Neuberger, an Oregon liberal, is an 
experienced legislator, having served in the Oregon general assembly and worked 
closely with her late husband, Senator Richard Neuberger. 

The committee has some excellent personnel, all in favor of more and 
better housing: Democrats John Sparkman, Ala., Paul Douglas, 111., Joseph Clark, 
Pa., William Proxmire, Wis., and Edmund Muskie, Me., and Republican Senator Jacob 
Javits, N. Y. We should see some interesting action from this committee in this 
session. 

FEBRUARY, 1961 3 





The Tacoma Story 




DO YOU WANT ... 

More jobs for carpenters 
More schools for your children 
More value for your tax dollar 
More sales for your local dealers 

You can have all these . . . 

BUILD YOUR SCHOOLS OF WOOD 

Here's how to win your school projects for wood. You can 
do it. The following pages of the Carpenter Magazine will 
tell you how to do it. Here's the information to help you, as 
craftsmen in wood, to obtain better schools for your com- 
munity, at less cost to the taxpayer, and with thousands of 
man-days of work you should be getting. 

Are your school officials giving wood a fair shake when 
they plan a new school building? Every time a school is built 
of other materials, you could lose hundreds of man-days of 
work. You pay more in taxes, because generally non-wood 
structures cost more. You pay more interest on bonds for years. 

The monument-builders are taking you, the wage-earner 
and taxpayer, for a ride. This is a time when the interests of 
your community and your own interests are the same: 

You want better schools, as local parents and citizens. 
You want less costly schools, as local taxpayers. 
You want schools that mean jobs, as local craftsmen 




THE CARPENTER 



you can tell the story 

You can show the superiority of 
vood in school construction. Hun- 
ireds of school districts have proved 
t to their own satisfaction. You can 
mn a hearing for wood in your 
;ommunity. 

Some school leaders are still think- 
ng of wood as it was used in schools 
uilt in the Gay Nineties. Modern 
chools have changed as much as au- 
omobiles have changed. And many 
f the most modern schools in Amer- 
:a are built of wood. 
Wood is best for: 
Economy Appearance 
Safety Low heating costs 

Durability Easy maintenance 
Flexibility in Ready Availability 
Planning Speed of Construction 

You'll be armed with proof of these 
ilaims in ensuing pages. Don't let 
vood's competitors hold the field 
vithout being challenged. Parents 
hould be told that wood is safe. Tax- 
ayers should be told that wood is 
ess expensive. School officials can 
ie told that wood is equal to any de- 
nands that today's education places 
lpon its buildings. 

Wood means more man-days for 
ocally available craftsmen, and that 
;eeps building money at home. Wood 
neans more business for local build- 
ng supply merchants. And the school 
milt of wood presents a warmer, 
riendlier appearance — less like a fac- 
ory, more like a home. 

In addition, you'll see in this report 

case history of a large community 
;oing suddenly and emphatically to 
vood schools — the story of Tacoma, 
Vashington. 

become active and influential 

You must play an active part to 
e influential in local school activi- 
ies. Remember that building mate- 
ials that are competitive against wood 
re always on the scene, being pushed 
orward by their backers. 

Don't let them take your jobs with- 
ut a fight. The wood industry and 
ie crafts have lost out too many 
mes simply by forfeit. Too often 
ley have lost out because no one 
'as there to tell the story of wood, 
lat wood is safe, durable, adaptable, 
vable — and less expensive. 

You can help to win back the domi- 
ance of wood in single-story school 
onstruction. It calls for definite ae- 
on by Carpenter Locals and by their 
idividual members. It calls for vig- 
rous public relations. 



Set up a new program boosting 
wood frame construction for schools. 
Make these steps part of your active 
campaign: 

1. Join forces with your natural 
allies, such as your local lum- 
ber dealers. Your Union Busi- 
ness Representative can take 
the lead to set up joint meet- 
ings. Map out a joint plan of 
action. Carpenters and lumber 
dealers are the two groups with 
the greatest self interest at stake. 
Leadership should come from 
here. 

2. When new buildings or addi- 
tions are discussed at school 
board meetings, be there. Have 
your best spokesmen there. You 
have a convincing story to tell 
about wood, but your school 
people may never know it if 
nobody tells them. This was a 
key to success in the Tacoma 
Story, described later in these 
pages. 

3. Demand that architects be di- 
rected to figure the cost of a 
school in wood also, if officials 
are specifying other materials 
only. Urge selection of archi- 
tects known to have worked 
successfully in wood, or who 
are at least open minded. A 
look at comparative costs should 
convert them. 

4. Support candidates for school 
boards who show an open mind 
on construction and who are 
aware of the qualities of wood. 
If necessary, place such a can- 
didate in the race. Select the 
best man you can find from 
your own ranks or from the 
lumber dealers. A qualified 
man from your groups can 
serve just as ably as from any 
other — and he's more likely to 
save taxpayers some money 
while obtaining safe, durable, 
friendly-looking new schools. 

5. Be active in parent-teacher 
groups as individuals. Let your 
fellow citizens and parents 
know the superior merits of 
wood, and what its use can 
mean in savings to them. Work 
to overcome the notion that 
wood cannot be safe in schools. 

6. See that school officials and 
architects designing schools in 
your community know about 
the highly successful work in 
wood that is going on in other 
districts throughout the country. 

7. See that the story of wood in 
schools is more widely told in 
newspapers and on radio and 



television. School board meet- 
ings quite generally are covered 
by reporters. If they are not, 
the press can be alerted when 
vital decisions are being con- 
sidered. Letters to your local 
editors have real influence — if 
they are factual, honest, well- 
timed and not too long. 

8. The forum has proved itself an 
excellent way to acquaint edu- 
cators, architects, taxpayers and 
the press with the practical use 
of wood in schools. Plan your 
forum well. Details on Taco- 
ma's highly successful forum 
are available to you. Obtain as 
speakers school administrators, 
designers, dealers, your own 
Carpenter Union officials who 
are familiar with wood con- 
struction and who also know- 
something about competitive 
materials. Where the facts are 
known, wood moves ahead. 

9. A Citizens Advisory Committee 
may be useful to your district. 
In some areas, such committees 
are helping school boards make 
the right decisions on projects 
by supplying them information 
on the availability of materials. 





The Tacoma Story 




EBRUARY, 1961 



Graceful wood arches form cafetor- 
ium dome for low-cost junior high 
school in Tacoma. Wood is modern, 
versatile, beautiful. 




financing and labor. There's 
nothing like a practical group 
of citizens in business and labor 
to overcome the combination of 
ignorance and the urge to 
build monuments at unreason- 
able cost. 

the tacoma story 

The case for the modern wood 
school stands complete and successful 
in "The Tacoma Story." That city in 
the State of Washington turned sud- 
denly and emphatically to wood con- 
struction in its public schools within 
the past four years. 

Your community will do the same 
if you can alert its citizens to the sav- 
ings and the advantages in building 
their schools of wood. The facts of 
the Tacoma story are facts that will 
interest any school district with a tight 
budget. These are facts that should 
help you convince your school 
officials. 

Tacoma is a community of nearly 
200,000 people. Its fast-growing 
school population has required close 
to 30 new schools or additions, erected 
in the past four years or now in plan- 
ning stages. Right now, the district 
has eight projects on the drawing 
boards and seven will be predomi- 
nantly of lumber and plywood, erected 
by carpenters. The eighth will be a 
replacement on a small site that forces 
multiple story construction. 

In Tacoma the great awakening 
came in 1956. It was born of a money 
crisis. That year the voters approved 
a bond issue to raise $8,500,000 for 
19 school projects. 

Wood was ignored in the design of 
the first five. Then came the shocker. 
The key project was the city's first 
new high school in 50 years. The 
lowest bid was so high the district 



The Tacoma Story 

... a case study of what can be accomplished 
in erecting cheaper schools through the use of 
wood. 



was forced to drop a $490,000 audi- 
torium out of the plans. The school 
had been designed in prestressed 
concrete. 

Work went ahead, and it cost $14 
a square foot, even after many fea- 
tures were taken out of the original 
budget. But by that time, citizens of 
Tacoma were jumping to their feet. 
A public forum was set up, and an 
eight-page special section on "Wood 
Schools" appeared in the local news- 
paper. 

A lumbermen's committee called on 
school officials, architects and struc- 
tural engineers. These people were 
told that lumber and plywood are 
available everywhere with grade 
stamps that guarantee quality, and 
that local skilled labor is always avail- 
able to work in wood. They were told 
that numerous smaller districts al- 
ready were proving the economy of 
wood. Seeing was believing. 

The last eight projects covered by 
Tacoma's bond issue were built of 
wood frame. And here was the final 
score for the 19 projects: Concrete, 
steel and other non-wood materials, 
$200,000 over the budget, not count- 
ing loss of the $490,000 auditorium. 
Wood frame, $446,000 under the 
budget. Non-wood: $13.73 per square 
foot. Wood: $11.69 per square foot. 



Wood was definitely less expensive 
The wood schools were designed to 
meet all safety and code requirements 
Tacoma found that contractors were 
able to complete their wood buildings 
more speedily than the others. And 
supplies of materials were always 
available. 

Crowning the whole series of Ta- 
coma projects is the Mt. Tahoma 
High school, which will be ready for 
service next September. Its six build 
ings are being constructed for $2, 
372,275. This will be a complete 
school for 1 ,300 students. It is gen- 
erally single-story on a campus plan 
with 162,000 square feet of space 
built for learning. 

Mt. Tahoma is being built "with all 
the wood the law will allow," to 
quote the architect. And for that rea- 
son, there was enough money to put 
in an Olympics-size swimming pool 
complete intercom system, television 
wired in all areas, 1000 upholstered 
seats in the auditorium and $2000 
worth of art work. And they still fig 
ure on turning back $50,000 surplus 

Even with all of these extras, the 
cost of this beautiful wood high school 
will run eight percent below the state's 
school construction ceiling. Boosters 
of wood have been pointing back to 
the previous high school to note it 

THE CARPENTER 




In the hands of skilled craftsmen, wood is unsurpassed for adapting to a building job. 



could have had its auditorium and 
still saved $100,000, if it had been 
built of wood. 

The architect for Mt. Tahoma high 
is a real evangelist for wood today. 
Only a few years ago he had won 
wide acclaim for his buildings of con- 
crete and steel. Robert B. Price has 
saved Tacoma many thousands of dol- 
lars by designing schools in wood. 

But his conversion to wood came 
on a design job not for Tacoma but 
for a suburb. University Place. He 
turned in plans for the first four build- 
ings of a junior-senior high school. 
His design called for concrete and 
steel. The directors shuddered at the 
cost, and Price designed the job again 
in wood — and saved more than 
5100,000. 

The four buildings containing 49,000 
quare feet and 15 teaching stations 
were built for $11.22 per square foot, 
well under state of Washington maxi- 
mums. A fifth building with four 



classrooms and two laboratories was 
added later for $11.05 a square foot. 

Now under construction is the 
sixth building, to provide nine class- 
rooms at a cost of $8.77 a square 
foot. The contract price includes 
architect's fees and the state's four 
percent sales tax, yet is far below the 
state's allowable of $14.66 per square 
foot for this type of school. 

Yes, Tacoma, the city that some 
years ago called itself the lumber 
capital of the world, has rediscovered 
wood for its schools. That city is 
building schools for less money, and 
its new buildings are modern, durable, 
adaptable and beautiful. 

You can tell the Tacoma story 
when you ask for an even break for 
wood frame construction in new 
schools being designed for your com- 
munity. 

This is the first of two articles on "The 
Tacoma Story." The second will appear in 
next month's issue. 




Big Push Urged In 
Housing Report 



Of vital interest to Carpenters is a 
recent "task force" report on housing 
prepared by a group of experts for 
President John F. Kennedy. The re- 
port was made available to Mr. Ken- 
nedy before his inauguration. 

The interest of the building trades 
in the subject of housing makes this 
one of the most significant reports pre- 
pared for the new President. It is 
one of many reports which special 
groups of experts have been asked to 
prepare for use of the new Adminstra- 
tion in formulating a legislative pro- 
gram for the new Congress. 

The main recommendation was cen- 
tered around more help for the low- 
income families of the nation, but 
there were other items of prime im- 
portance in the 87-page study sub- 
mitted to the President shortly before 
he was inaugurated. 

Here are some of the recommenda- 
tions of the housing task force: 

• establishment of a cabinet-rank de- 
partment to handle housing and 
urban affairs; 

• liberalization of the Federal Hous- 
ing Administration's loan terms; 

• a new loan FHA insurance program 
for site development; 

• additional funds for the Federal 
National Mortgage Association; 

• additional funds for a direct-loan 
program for non-profit corporations 
for housing for the elderly; 

• additional funds of some $500 mil- 
lion per year for college housing; 

• a four-year program of $650 mil- 
lion annually for urban renewal; 

• a four-year program of partial 
grants for community facilities not 
to exceed $750 million a year; 

• a program of planning grants for 
public facility loans to improve mass 
transportation ($100 million a 
year) ; 

• planning grants and limited loans 
for "orderly suburban develop- 
ment"; 

• a greater program of housing re- 
search and urban development; 

• an expanded program of farm hous- 
ing activities; 

• a series of special studies under a 
new housing department covering 
problems of mortgage foreclosure, 
mortgage credit, local codes and tax 
policies. 



'EBRUARY, 1961 




These 

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at home. 



Name- 



_Age_ 



Address- 
City 



-Zone S tate_ 



Occupation. 



Millwright Apprentice 
Units Are Available 

"Ten second class individuals can- 
not take the place of one topnotch 
man." 

The above opinion was recently ex- 
pressed by Dr. James Conant, one of 
the nation's foremost educators, who 
last year completed a comprehensive 
survey of our entire educational struc- 
ture. 

Dr. Conant probably was thinking 
of scientists when he made his remark. 
However, it is as applicable to the 
skilled trades as it is to chemists and 
physicists. There is no real substitute 
for the man with the know-how. And 
nowhere is this truer than in mill- 
wrighting where mechanics must work 
to close tolerances with a wide variety 
of tools and materials. 

To insure that suitable teaching ma- 
terials are available for properly train- 
ing young men in the skills of mill- 
wrighting, our Brotherhood's Appren- 
ticeship Committee has developed a 
seven-unit apprenticeship training 
course. The units cover all phases of 
millwrighting from the use and care 
of tools to blueprint reading and esti- 
mating. These units are available 
through the General Office. A de- 
scription and price list are printed 
below. 
Units I through V and Binder. .$8.50 

Unit 1 — Safety; and Tools 

and Materials $1.00 

Unit 2 — Mathematics; and 
Mechanics and 
Strength of Materials . . 1 .00 

Unit 3 — (Part 1) — Con- 
struction Practices ... 1.00 

Unit 3— (Parts 2 and 3 it- 
Construction Practices. 1.00 

Unit 3 — (Parts 4 and 5) — 

Construction Practices. 1.00 
Unit 4 — Receiving, Inspec- 
tion, and Setting of 
Equipment; Black- 
smithing; Welding; 
Electricity; Steam- 
fitting; and General 
Maintenance Prac- 
tices 1 .00 

Unit 5 — Blueprint Reading 

and Estimating 1 .00 

Blue Print Plan C (6 to set) . . 1.00 
Blue Print Plan D (14 to set) . . 3.00 
Direct all inquiries and make all 
remittances payable to R. E. Livings- 
ton, General Secretary, 222 East 
Michigan St., Indianapolis 4, Ind. 



THE CARPENTER 



Brotherhood 

to 
Sponsor 

Safety 

Training 
Course 



BETWEEN now and 1970, an 
estimated 150,000 workers will be 
killed in on-the-job accidents. An- 
other 20,000,000 will be injured seri- 
ously enough to lose time from work. 
Home and highway accidents will 
multiply these figures by three or four. 

What percentage of the victims will 
be Brotherhood members? That de- 
pends on how diligently safety pro- 
grams are developed and pushed by 
our local unions, district councils, and 
our members themselves. Statistics 
reveal that accidents go down when 
men know how to work safely and in- 
sist that only safe working procedures 
ire followed. 

To enable our members to become 
better acquainted with newest develop- 
ments in the field of safety, our Broth- 
erhood is sponsoring a series of 
safety training institutes in conjunc- 
tion with the AFL-CIO and the 
Bureau of Labor Standards. Purpose 
of these institutes is to train a sizeable 
group of local leaders who can return 
to their localities and pass on their 
knowledge to local safety committees. 

The frightful annual toll of killed 
and injured members long has been 
a major concern of General President 
Maurice A. Hutcheson. In meetings 
of the AFL-CIO and Building Trades 

FEBRUARY, 1961 




FACT SHEET 

1. Purpose — To establish a method of training teachers for AFL-CIO affili- 

ates in matters of safety and occupational health, graduates 
would return to their respective organizations and develop 
training programs for the general membership. 

2. Attendance — Enrollment in the Institute would be limited to trade union- 

ists. Upon successful completion of the full training program. 
AFL-CIO Certificates of Training would be issued to graduates. 

3. Nature of Training — The complete courses of safety training would prob- 

ably consist of four units: 

a. Introduction to Safety Training 

b. Mechanical and Physical Safety Training 

c. Chemical and Environmental (including Radiation) Safety 

d. Teacher Training in Safety. 

4. Method of Training — Each unit of training would require one week of 

instruction. Each class would be limited to approximately 25 
persons. One unit of training would be presented each quarter- 
year, so that anyone could obtain his AFL-CIO Certificate in 
one year. However, each unit of instruction will be presented 
independently of the other units so that students could accumu- 
late their training at their convenience. Instructions could be 
started during the first quarter of 1961. 

5. Faculty — The Teachers for the Institute will be drawn principally from 

the Training Staff of the Bureau of Labor Standards, U. S. 
Department of Labor. 

6. Location of Institute — The Institute would be located at the AFL-CIO 

Headquarters Building in Washington, D. C. 

7. Cost of Training — The entire cost of training would be limited to the 

expenses of transportation, room and board of each trainee 
and borne by each affiliate for its own students. The actual 
training would be free to members of the AFL-CIO affiliates. 
Privately conducted safety training courses cost as much as 
$300.00 per week. 



Councils he consistently has urged 
more emphasis on safety training and 
accident prevention. 

The Standing Committee on Safety 
and Occupational Health has had his 
strong support. Likewise, the national 
conferences on safety problems in 
1959 and 1960 received his enthusi- 
astic backing. 

Last year he directed a letter to all 
subordinate bodies urging participation 
in the work of the National Safety 
Council. In response to that appeal, a 
large number of local unions and dis- 
trict councils have affiliated with the 
National Safety Council. 

The establishment of Brotherhood 
training institutes where a hard core 
of real safety experts can be developed 
is a further step in President Hutche- 
son's campaign to cut down the ac- 
cident toll among our members. These 
institutes will emphasize all approaches 
to accident prevention — through effec- 
tive labor-management relations, 
through education and training, and 
through adequate safety legislation at 
all levels of government. They will 
be real work sessions guided by men 
who have devoted their lives to safety 
work. 

The success of the institutes will 
depend in large part on the ability and 
sincerity of the individuals chosen to 
participate in the program. Such per- 
sons should be capable and sincere 
enough to learn and should be able 
to express themselves well enough to 
pass what they have learned along to 
others. They should also have suffi- 
cient time to devote to safety work 
after completing their training. 

Under the direction of General 
President Hutcheson our Brotherhood 
is embarked on a far-flung, all-out 
effort to reduce the heavy accident toll 
that costs our members so dearly every 
year. With the cooperation of local 
unions and councils the program can 
pay off in fewer deaths and less lost 
time. 

The accompanying Fact Sheet gives 
details regarding the training institute. 
As the Fact Sheet indicates, there is 
no charge for the courses. However, 
each trainee must be responsible for 
his own travel and living expenses. It 
is hoped that the first institute can be 
scheduled for late March. Locals and 
councils genuinely interested in pro- 
moting the cause of safety will recog- 
nize the value of these institutes and 
the importance of participating. 

COOK for me 
UMON 
LA8e(, 




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THE CARPENTER 



5th District Honors Bob Roberts 
On Retirement After Long Service 



FIFTY years, 2 months and 1 9 days 
after taking the Brotherhood ob- 
ligation in Texarkana, Texas, retired 
Board Member R. E. Roberts was 
honored at a luncheon held at the 
Sheraton-Fontenelle Hotel, Omaha, 
Nebraska, October 29. 

The luncheon was arranged by 
members of the Fifth District to pay 
tribute to Brother Roberts' long and 
distinguished career of service to the 
United Brotherhood. Some thirty-five 
members representing local unions 
and district councils throughout the 
Fifth District attended the luncheon. 

Brother Roberts was initiated in 
Local Union No. 379, Texarkana, 
Texas, on August 10, 1910. The fol- 
lowing year he transferred to Local 
No. 520 of Dallas, Texas. Shortly 
thereafter he was elected president of 
that union and he served in that ca- 
pacity until the union consolidated 
with Local Union No. 198 of Dallas 
in 1913. Two years later he was 
elected president of Local 198 and in 
1917 the membership selected him to 
serve them as business representative. 
The following year he was elected 
secretary-treasurer of the Texas State 
Council of Carpenters — a position he 
held until June 1, 1925, when he was 
appointed a General Representative. 
Ten years later, on January 8, 1935, 
he became General Executive Board 
Member for the Fifth District. He 
remained in that position until June 1, 
1960, at which time he voluntarily 
retired. 




Omaha D. C. President Chadwell makes 
a presentation to Brother Roberts. 

In his years of service Brother 
Roberts saw the United Brotherhood 
make tremendous progress in the 
Southwest and plains states. Much of 
the progress resulted from his tireless 
efforts to build a stronger United 
Brotherhood and a greater labor 
movement. 

All the speakers at the luncheon 
were of one accord; no man served 
the labor movement more faithfully 
or more diligently over the past half 
century than did Brother Roberts. 

Dave Chadwell, president of the 
Omaha District Council, acted as mas- 
ter of ceremonies. On behalf of the 
district council he presented to 
Brother Roberts a portable television 
set with a remote control panel and an 
adjustable stand. On behalf of the 
local unions of Nebraska he also gave 
Brother Roberts a recliner chair to 
make television viewing easy and com- 
fortable. 




Special guests at the luncheon in- 
cluded General Representative Cy 
Driscoll, a lifelong friend of Brother 
Roberts, and General Representatives 
Sam Curd and Mark Bagby who 
worked closely with Brother Roberts 
over the years. 

A bronze plaque commemorating 
the achievements of Brother Roberts 
over the past half century was pre- 
sented to Brother Roberts by his suc- 
cessor. General Executive Board 
Member Leon Greene on behalf of 
the Fifth District. In addition, an en- 
graved silver cigarette box was also 
presented as a lasting memento of the 
occasion. 

Finlay Allan, assistant to President 
Maurice A. Hutcheson, represented 
the General Office at the luncheon. 
On behalf of all the General Officers 
he extended to Brother Roberts the 
thanks and very best wishes of the 
entire General Office. 

"It is stalwart and dedicated leaders 
like Brother Roberts who laid the 
solid foundations upon which our 
Brotherhood rests today. It is only 
fitting that we should have an oc- 
casion of this kind to pay tribute to 
one of the best of them," he said. 

In a very short response Brother 
Roberts told the luncheon guests that 
the progress of the United Brother- 
hood has always been his major in- 
terest during his active years and 
will continue to be during his years 
of retirement. 



65 Years of Married Life 

Last October. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Woodbury of Fort Dodge, Iowa, cele- 
brated their 65th wedding anniversary. 
Local Union No. 641, to which 
Brother Woodbury has belonged since 
1909, helped the couple mark the 
event fittingly. An open house, at- 
tended by a host of friends and fellow 
workers, gave Mr. and Mrs. Wood- 
bury an opportunity to renew many 
acquaintances of long standing. Al- 
though retired at the present time. 
Brother Woodbury still maintains an 
active interest in the affairs of his 
union. He attends more meetings than 
many active members. 



COOK rox. TMS 

UNtON CfiBSC. 



Old friends surround a great old warrior. 
FEBRUARY, 1961 




11 



IBUMTTOMAli 




OTHERS THINK SO TOO 

Anyone who reads a labor paper regularly knows 
that the labor press does not have a very high regard 
for either the accuracy or fairness of publications 
issued by the Chamber of Commerce. Apparently 
the labor press is not alone in this critical assessment 
of Chamber publications. The following two examples 
serve as a case in point: 

GAYLORD NELSON, 
GOVERNOR OF WISCONSIN, 

(in a speech to a recent State C. of C. conference:) 

I read carefully your "Governmental Affairs 
Bulletin" for the period of the last two years. 
Most of these bulletins concerned themselves 
with legislative affairs. 
What I found out from this reading of your bul- 
letin was that the "business interest" in government, 
as conceived and expressed by your organization, is 
shockingly short-sighted, selfish and narrow interest. 
I found that your idea of the "business interest" 
meant all-out opposition to any kind of public regula- 
tion of any kind of business, opposition to almost any 
kind of tax program, and opposition to almost any 
kind of public "spending," however desirable the goal 
or urgent the need. 

Although it wasn't an issue on the state level, I 
discovered that you are still at war with the concept 
of social security, that you are committed to a last 
gasp determination to hold this humane and univers- 
ally acclaimed program to a "minimum level." I 
think this indicates how far out of step with the 
public needs of our times your organization has 
become. 

/ found, in your bulletins, an astonishing lack 
of attention to and concern for the urgent prob- 
lems facing the state — the problems of educating 
our children, caring for the mentally ill and 
the elderly, building highways, conserving our 
natural resources, and other challenges that con- 
front us. 
These are the urgent and necessary needs that re- 
quire the "spending" that you condemn so indiscrimi- 
nately. Nowhere in your bulletins is there even a 
faint suggestion that any part of this spending might 
be necessary to promote and protect the general wel- 
fare of our state and its citizens. 

You will not like my saying this, but it is some- 
thing that needs saying. As I read the bulletins of the 
Wisconsin Chamber of Commerce I could not help but 



12 



contrast this expression of your official views with 
the expressed views of labor unions. 

Labor organizations have shown keen and 
affirmative interest in a much wider range of 
legislation. They are concerned with such issues 
as education, civil rights, welfare and world 
peace, as well as what they call the "bread and 
butter" issues of higher wages and better work- 
ing conditions. 
These problems should certainly be of as much 
interest to businessmen as they are to factory workers. 
I would like to suggest that you ask yourselves why 
your organization is not equally concerned, why your 
organization is so often ranged against forward-looking 
legislation, why the Wisconsin Chamber of Com- 
merce is so deeply identified in the public's mind as 
a relentlessly negative force in the life and politics of 
our state. 

* * * 

LABOR-MANAGEMENT PANEL, 

(a publication of San Francisco University — 

Jan.-Feb., 1961). 

The Labor Relations Letter, published by the 
Labor Relations and Legal Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the United States, for 
December 1960, offers a prime example of a 
highly partisan press fostering class conflict 
causing industrial unrest and dividing America 
when we need our greatest unity to meet our 
commitments at home and abroad. 

. . . This Letter would be expected to 
make constructive suggestions to its readers 
on collective bargaining issues; to give a 
running commentary on court decisions and 
National Labor Relations Board's rulings 
and to keep us advised on improved 
techniques for the daily administration of 
the bargaining agreement. Many other 
worthwhile projects could be suggested, but 
the above are sufficient to indicate the 
proper use of such a Letter. 
However, let us look at the December 1960 issue 
On page one, column one under the caption UNIONS 
PUSH BILL IN STATES TO CURB STRIKE RE 
PLACEMENTS, the following terminology is found 
"AFL-CIO trust; . . . union racket; . . . blackmai 
picketing" . . . and the sixth paragraph begins: "There 
is also no provision to prohibit union officials from 
importing goons and hoodlums to cause violence and 
intimidate employees who want to work." 

THE CARPENTER 



It must be admitted that all unions are not clean, 
but the clear implication of this article is to incite a 
feeling of revulsion against the very idea of unionism. 
It is clearly inflammatory writing and certainly not cal- 
culated to clear and calm thinking. 

. . . There are still a few union publications 
that resort to the same type of vilification of the 
employers, but, for the most part, they are now 
concerning themselves with the political, eco- 
nomic and social issues of the day. The official 
AFL-CIO News of December 17, 1960, a twelve- 
page tabloid, contains only one item similar to 
those carried in Labor Relations Letter, i.e., on 
price fixing charges ELECTRICAL GIANTS 
ENTER GUILTY PLEAS. If the editors of the 
News had scoured the newspapers of the country 
they could have found many cases where man- 
agement people were found guilty of embezzle- 
ment, theft, etc.. to fill the pages of their tabloid. 
To their credit they elected not to do it. 



SHADES OF 1932 

Washington, D. C. papers for January 26 carried 
a story that must have struck fear in the hearts of 
many old timers. The story announced that the Sal- 
vation Army was setting up a soup kitchen in Hagers- 
town, Maryland, to keep unemployed families from 
actually facing starvation. Whether or not this is the 
first soup kitchen to put in an appearance during the 
recession of 1960-1961 we have no way of knowing, 
but the thought of a return to the rugged days of 
1932, when every city had a string of soup kitchens 
operating on a hit or miss basis, chills the blood. 

Hagerstown, of course, is one of the 
hardest hit cities in the nation insofar as 
unemployment is concerned. Its jobless rate 
is nearly twice the national average. And 
prospects for immediate improvement are 
no better than fair. 
A substantial percentage of Hagerstown workers 
are existing on surplus foods provided by the govern- 
ment. The list of foods available under the program 
is pretty austere. One of the first actions of the new 
President was to expand the list of foods available to 
unemployed. 

But for all this, the Salvation Army deemed 
it vital to open a soup kitchen to keep people 
from becoming victims of malnutrition. The 
funds it has at its disposition to finance its 
kitchen are extremely meager. The unemployed 
cannot look to this source for succor for any 
length of time. 
Since Hagerstown is on the back doorstep of the 
Capital and the White House we strongly recommend 
that all our lawmakers in both the legislative and 
executive branches of our government take a long 
hard look at the Hagerstown soup kitchen. 
It is an omen that bodes no good for anyone. 

FEBRUARY, 1961 



DECENT MEDICAL AID 
BILL NO CINCH 

Any day now, Congress will again take up the mat- 
ter of a decent and feasible medical aid bill for old- 
sters. The last session neatly side-stepped the issue 
by passing a meaningless compromise measure that is 
neither fish nor fowl. It does nothing for the old 
people and consequently costs no money and raises no 
problems. 

Labor is determined that a decent bill be 

enacted in the present session. Only a bill that 

ties medical care to the Social Security system 

can meet the needs of retired citizens. Anything 

else is a sham and a subterfuge. 

But this is the very kind of bill the conservatives 

are committed to block at all costs. Already the same 

old seedy and threadbare arguments against Forand- 

type legislation are cropping up. 

The die-hard conservatives in Congress 
proclaim that medical standards would be 
undermined by a government-sponsored 
medical aid bill. But these same Senators 
and Congressmen hie themselves to the 
Naval Hospital pronto when they get an in- 
growing toenail or a belly-ache. They can't 
get to a government-run hospital fast 
enough when they need medical attention. 
But as soon as they recover they get back 
on the floor of Congress to make speeches 
on how bad it would be for the older people 
to get a little of the same sort of service 
through Social Security. And they do it with 
straight faces, too. Such is the hypocrisy of 
American political life. 
No one wants to see the government dominate 
medical care. Labor would oppose such a proposal as 
vigorously as any other group. 

But what in Heaven's name is wrong with a pro- 
gram that integrates medical care with the Social Se- 
curity program; a program that leaves people free to 
choose their own doctors and hospitals but makes the 
funds for meeting the costs available through a special 
Social Security fund? 

Recently, an Indianapolis newspaper carried an 
editorial opposing any such form of medical aid bill. 
A Social Security approach to medical care for the 
aged involves compulsion, said the editorial, and com- 
pulsion is a bad thing. 

A friend of ours called the paper and asked if the 
paper would back the bill if oldsters were given the 
alternative of taking their contributions in cash and 
being responsible for their own medical bills. The 
answer was a banged receiver. So there seems to be 
hypocrisy in the opposition of newspapers, too. 

But the opposition to Forand-type medical aid 
is mighty powerful. It blocked decent legislation 
last year and it will succeed again unless the labor 
movement increases its pressure. Unions would 
do well to watch developments closely and be 
prepared to give all-out support to a Forand-type 
bill when it is up for action. 



13 




Labor Wants Jobs, Not Reports 




The rising tide of unemployment is 
still the chief worry of the trade union 
movement in Canada as 1961 enters 
its second month. 

The new year found Canada's job- 
less pushing the half million mark. In 
a total work force of about six million, 
this is around 8% out of work — more 
than double the number considered 
permissible in a healthy economy. The 
figure is almost sure to go higher, 
labor economists predict. 

Many of the unemployed are of 
course drawing unemployment insur- 
ance benefits (at a maximum of $36 
a week) but as they run out of bene- 
fits, far too many are thrown back on 
meager savings — or on public relief. 
As one public figure stated, the vision 
of the 1960's is more like a night- 
mare. 

U.I. Fund 

The nine-man national unemploy- 
ment insurance committee told the 
House of Commons in late December 
that the unemployment insurance fund 
will be just about dry by next May. 
The government has drained the fund 
of about $150 million by paying 
money out of the fund which should 



really have been paid out of the gen- 
eral treasury for jobless relief. 

Pressure on Labor 

An interesting sidelight on the way 
employers look at the current reces- 
sion is given in a recent issue of 
"Canadian Business". A Montreal 
economist, Dr. D. E. Armstrong, ad- 
vises management that the recession 
cloud could have a silver lining if 
they would only take advantage of it. 
He says: 

"Given these alternating periods of 
good times and bad, it is really the 
recession and not the boom which 
presents the intelligent businessman 
with profitable opportunities." 
He goes on to say: 
"For one thing, a change in produc- 
tion sometimes involves a conflict 
with a union, and because unions 
have less bargaining power when 
there is unemployment, they are less 
likely to be successful in resisting 
change." 

Congress Policy 

The Canadian Labour Congress has 
spelled out a four-point program to 
make jobs including large scale public 



investment, national planning, a full 
employment act, tax reductions and 
improved social security. Even if only 
part of this program were undertaken 
at once, employment levels could be 
raised substantially if not quickly. 

For example, it is estimated that a 
230% increase in funds for education 
will be needed before 1965 just to 
keep our educational standards at the 
present level. With the times calling 
for improved standards and expanded 
educational programs, funds for edu- 
cation should be substantially in- 
creased — both for more and better 
schools and teaching personnel. 

Planning Necessary 

An economy on the downslide can- 
not of course support such expansion. 
That's why the implementation oi 
Congress policy quickly is so urgent 
Planned investment, in the public sec- 
tor of the economy particularly, is the 
best way to make jobs at the presen 
time. Stepped-up construction wouk 
re-employ thousands in the building 
trades and make its effect felt in othei 
industries like steel and other build- 
ing materials, power utilities, furnish- 
ings, services and so on. 



14 



THE CARPENTEF 



Unfortunately the year-end emer- 
gency budget brought down by the 
federal government showed no signs of 
acknowledging the soundness of the 
Congress's position. All that the 
budget did was put a 15% tax, instead 
of 5%, on dividends going out of 
Canada, adjust the corporation tax on 
companies making annual profits of 
less than $35,000. provide double de- 
preciation for one year for capital ex- 
penditures in depressed areas and such 
minor items. 

The only immediate effect of the 
budget was to depress the value of 
the Canadian dollar in terms of the 
U.S. dollar. This will favorably affect 
the profits of Canadian exporters like 
the paper companies, while making it 
more difficult for Canadian municipal- 
ities and others for borrowing on fav- 
orable terms from the United States. 

Covering these ineffective measures, 
however, was the federal government's 
announcement of a Royal Commission 
to look into a national prepaid medical 
care plan. So little action has been 
taken on recommendations of Royal 
Commissions which have already re- 
ported that people are becoming 
skeptical of these official investiga- 
tions. They are taken as maneuvers 
to avoid doing anything. 

These commissions, however, usual- 
ly give all sections of the public a 
chance to air their views and the trade 
union movement can be counted on to 
restate its position as being 100% in 
favor of national prepaid health serv- 
ices under public auspices. 

On the other hand the Prime 
Minister named the Canadian Medical 
Association as one body which urged 
an enquiry, and the medical lobby is 
opposed to any prepaid plan which 
they themselves dori't control. 

In any case the province of Saskat- 
chewan is committed to a prepaid plan 
of health care (they originated the 
prepaid hospital plan, now in effect in 
every province, in 1946J and a 
Saskatchewan commission is hard at 
work preparing a basis for its opera- 
tion. It's almost certain that this 
prairie province will put a prepaid 
medical plan into effect before the 
national commission reports. 

News in Brief 

The end of the premium on the 
Canadian dollar improved the bar- 
gaining position of workers engaged 
n export industries like the big paper 
companies. 

To the extent that it will be more 
expensive to buy foreign-made goods 

FEBRUARY. 1961 



in Canada, Canadian industries should 
be helped. 

With some big union contracts 
coming up for renewal . . . basic steel 
and auto in particular . . . this might 
improve the bargaining situation. 

Bargaining goals will of course be 
better wages and shorter hours, but 
unless the recession lifts, fringe bene- 
fits might get more emphasis. 

It is estimated that the majority of 
those out of work, as much as 80%, 
are in the unskilled categories. 

Welfare officers point out too that 
a great many are young men who left 
school early, took jobs, got married, 
had kids, bought homes — now find 
themselves without a livelihood. 

The Carpenters' union in the 
Toronto area joined with the Cana- 
dian Labour Congress officials in pro- 
testing the tactics of a strikebreaking 
agency headed by a former Metro- 
politan Toronto police inspector. 

CLC regional director of organiza- 
tion Harry Simon charged the Barnes 
Investigation Bureau with driving 
strikebreakers through a picket line. 
Strikebreakers were used at Bury 
Lumber. Toronto Local Carpenters' 
president Angus Smith protested that 
the agency was "helping to break the 
strike." 

1960 housing starts were way be- 
hind 1959 at year's end. Bureau of 
Statistics' figures showed housing 
starts for 1 1 months of '60 were only 
about 70.000 compared with about 
100,000 in '59. 

Toronto is a busy, wealthy, modern 
city but a recent survey showed that 
thousands of homes lack essential con- 
veniences. Of 2 1 .600 houses examined, 
14% needed drastic repairs. Over 
4500 had no flush toilets, bath or 
showers for exclusive use. 

Four out of five homes which 
needed major repairs were rental units 
— probably held as speculative invest- 
ments by their owners. 

The worse the area, the larger the 
families in it and a quarter of the 
units were occupied by two or more 
families. Even the worst accommoda- 
tion rented for $60 to $70 a month. 

The report recommended a massive 
rehabilitation program. 

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16 



Old Glory is raised for the first time on the striking stainless steel flagpole. Partici- 
pating in the ceremonies (left to right) are: First General Vice President John R. 
Stevenson, General Secretary Richard E. Livingston, Second General Vice President 
O. William Blaier, General President Maurice A. Hutcheson, and Architect Holabird. 

THE CARPENTEI 















Photos on this and the facing page were taken on an important ceremonial day for 
the Carpenters — the first flag-raising and placement of the cornerstone. General 
President M. A. Hutcheson officiates at the cornerstone, becoming a trowel tradesman 
temporarily. In the copper cornerstone box went a number of items of historical 
significance, including copies of the Carpenter constitution and by-laws, union roster 
and other papers which indicate the healthy state of the Carpenters' Cnion in 1961. 



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FEBRUARY, 1961 



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18 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMORIAM 



L. U. NO. 12, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Aird, Robert 

Daino, Paul 

Peggs, John 
L. U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Andersen, Fritz 

Barrett, Ezra 
L. U. NO. 18, HAMILTON, ONT. 

Jaz. Frank 
L U. NO. 25, LOS ANGELES, CAL 

Anderson, Martin 

Atchison, Harry G. 

Goudge, Harrison 

Harris, Russell H. 

Herman. John S. 

Momo, M. L. 

Wallace, William S. 
L. U. NO. 30, NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Peretti, Joseph P. 
L. U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 

Cook, Russell 
L. U. NO. 50, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

McBrayer. Frank 
L. U. NO. 72, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Boughton, Arthur 

Kammer, George 

Montgomery. Fred 

Schleich. John 
L. (J. NO. 90, EVANSVILLE, INO. 

Brashears, Fred 
L. U. NO. 100, MUSKEGON, MICH. 

White, Kenneth Lee 
L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Huff, Russell H. 
L. U. NO. 103, BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Aldridge, G. J. 

Bean, J. A. 

Garvin, M. I. 

Jennings, W. 

McGraw, L. B. 

Partain, C. C. 

Raymond. J. D. 

Ross, E. F 

Rotenberry, E. P. 

Terry. Bill 

West, J. E. 
L. U. NO. 104, DAYTON, OHIO 

Gove, C. E. 

Klosterman. Richard 

Mason. C. G. 

Reck, Harold 

Strom. Carl 

Taylor, Dave 
L. U. NO. 106, DES MOINES. IOWA 

Davisson, Frank 
L. U. NO. 139, JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

Schlatmann, William 
L. U. NO. 188, YONKERS, N. Y. 

Bloomquist. Herman 
L. U. NO. 198, DALLAS, TEXAS 

Cash, O. B. 

Millican. John W. 

Moody. B. F. 

Parrish. J. C. 

Street. W. F. 
L. U. NO. 200, COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Basham, Gilbert 

Hazelett, Chilton 

McGill, Ray 

Miller. Ervin 
L. U. NO. 218, BOSTON, MASS. 

Corkum. Chesley 

Ducey. Anthony 

Herald. William H. 

Perry. Fenwick 

Small. Edward 
L. U. NO. 220, WALLACE, IDA. 

Nordquist, J. O. 

FEBRUARY. 1961 



L. U. NO. 225, ATLANTA, GA. 

Cherry. J. L. 

Jackson, Andy 

Lee A B 
L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Rizzolo. Joseph 
L. U. NO. 266, STOCKTON, CAL. 

Orr, John M. 

Roberson, Hillard 

Stutter. Harry 
L. U. NO. 345, MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Jones, Walton L. 

MacDonald. Donald 

Wallace, William M. 
L. U. NO. 393, CAMDEN, N. J. 

Bratton. Mark 

Brunnot, Fred 

Fishback. Frank 

Gorman, Thomas L. 

Haldeman, Arthur L. 

Haverkamp, Frederick A. 

Hughes, Charles C. 

Hurford. Maris B. 

Jones. George 

Kelly. Francis E. 

Lobach. Martin L. 

McClinton. Alfred 

Nibour. Grover C. 

Russell. Walter 

Whitehead. Arthur 

Williams, Alfred S. 

Wilson. Harry J. 
L. U. NO. 411, SANANGELO, TEXAS 

Barker. H. M. 

Woodul. M. L. 
L. U. NO. 579, ST. JOHN'S, NEWF. 

Barnes, Charles 
L. U. NO. 584, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Gray. Andrew 

Washington. George 

Wright. Joseph F. 
L. U. NO. 712, COVINGTON, KY. 

Wintring. Edward F. 
L. U. NO. 769, PASADENA, CAL. 

Elliott. Ray R. 
L. U. NO. 776, MARSHALL, TEXAS 

Horton. I. H. 

Weaver. H. E. 
L. U. NO. 787. NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Cavallero. Josef 
L. U. NO. 844, RESEDA, CAL. 

Rice. William R. 
L. U. NO. 854. MADISONVILLE, OHIO 

Haney. William 

Williams. Bert 



L. U. NO. 871, BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 

Luff, Thomas 
L. U. NO. 930, ST. CLOUD, MINN. 

Kilian, James 
L. U. NO. 1138, TOLEDO, OHIO 

Crane. Ellis 
L. U. NO. 1224, EMPORIA, KANS. 

Keith, C. Darrel 
L. U. NO. 1323, MONTEREY, CAL. 

Milbourn. Orville V. 
L. U. NO. 1394, FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Best. C. J. 
L. U. NO. 1400, SANTA MONICA, CAL. 

Albert, Adam 

Austin. Harold T. 
L. U. NO. 1423, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS 

Garrett. Edgar H. 
L. U. NO. 1453, COSTA MESA, CAL. 

Dye, Elmer 

Palomo. Ted C. 
L. U. NO. 1478, RED0ND0 BEACH, CAL. 

Gonzales, Lorenzo S. 

Powell. William 
L. U. NO. 1493, P0MPT0N LAKES, N. J. 

Jordan. Carmen 
L. U. NO. 1529, KANSAS CITY, KANS. 

Stevenson. E. R. 

Vogelsmeier. Henry 
L. U. NO. 1598, VICTORIA, B. C. 

McLean, Robert Hamilton 
L. U. NO. 1615, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Bernot. Anthony 
L. U. NO. 1683, EL DORADO, ARK. 

Witherincton. George E. 
L. U. NO. 1693, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Sandstrom. John 
L. U. NO. 1765, ORLANDO, FLA. 

Weatherford, C. R. 
L. U. NO. 1768, JACKSONVILLE, TEXAS 

Priestly. E. F. 
L. U. NO. 1822, FT. WORTH, TEXAS 

Clark. James T. 

Whatley. Orville 
L. U. NO. 1846, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bollinger. Joseph 
L. U. NO. 2024, MIAMI, FLA. 

Lewis, J. G. 

Powell. Ben C. 

Wickizer, Louie 
L. U. NO. 2027. RAPID CITY, S. D. 

Markus. Nels 
L. U. NO. 2039, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bergeron. Frank R. 
L. U. NO. 3110, BLACK MOUNTAIN, N. C. 

Hughev. Lester R. 



NASHVILLE LOCAL MOURNS MEMBER 



From time to time this journal has 
carried stories tending to emphasize the 
ruggedness of carpenters. The story of 
Brother Charles S. Ball of Local Union 
No. 507. Nashville. Tenn.. adds new 
proof to the legend. 

Brother Ball passed away last fall at 
the age of 103. At the time of his 
death he was vigorous of body and alert 
of mind. Employed as Maintenance 
Superintendent at Ward-Belmont Girls 
School for some 30 years, he was retired 
at the age of 95 through no fault of 
his own. A younger man was hurt on 
the job and Brother Ball was retired for 
his own safety. At the age of 75 he lost 
a leg through an infection, but this did 



not slow him down. He kept right on 
working for another 20 years. 

The Local Union tendered a party to 
Brother Ball on his hundredth birthday 
and no one there had a better time than 
Brother Ball. 

He joined Local Union No. 507 in 
1906, and through the years he main- 
tained a steady interest in the affairs of 
the organization. He prided himself on 
that fact that he voted in every election 
from the time he was old enough to 
vote, including the state primary held 
August 4. 1960. 

His passing naturally saddened Local 
Union No. 517 and the entire Brother- 
hood joins in mourning the passing of a 
remarkable number. 



19 






\ 



BtutyetBattte 



Departing from our usual economy 
tips, we would like to turn this month 
to a problem that has beset many of 
us during these last stormy weeks — 
what to do when the power goes off. 

It really is possible to live without 
television, a baking oven, or your tele- 
phone. We have all grown accustomed 
to comforts and luxuries but if disaster 
strikes, either natural or manmade, we 
may be forced to live under primitive 
conditions. 

An emergency situation might last 
a few hours, a day, a week or longer. 
How well are you and your family 
prepared to meet the challenge . . . 
and come out healthy and happy at 
the end of the siege? 

There are three things you need — 
knowledge of the danger and how to 
overcome it, shelter from it and sur- 
vival supplies. 

You cannot expect outside help im- 
mediately in any widespread emer- 
gency. Whatever befalls you has 
probably happened to hundreds or 
thousands of others. Arm yourself in 
advance to be responsible — personally 
— for survival at home. 

One matter of first importance is 
that the family be together during any 
hardship. Anxiety and fear will be less 
of a hazard if you are all in one place. 
So go home, if you can, when trouble 
strikes your area. 

You may save your house from 
destruction by disconnecting all appli- 



ances, including your stove, which 
could cause fire if upset. Close the 
doors on your coal-burning furnace. 
Shut off the feed line valve from your 
oil tank. 

A crisis may mean injury and doc- 
tors may be busy elsewhere. How 
much do you know about emergency 
care of the sick or wounded? It would 
be wise to take one of the free courses 
in First Aid offered by the American 
National Red Cross. 

You can last for weeks without 
food, but you must have water. Did 
you know that water can be stored 
for three months without losing its 
freshness and good taste? Keep at 
least 7 gallons of water — per person — 
cached in a dark, cool place. You 




THE CARPENTER 



can store it in bottles, jars, anything 
that can be closed tightly. 

Every three months, empty, rinse 
and refill the containers. And keep 
a supply of water purification tablets 
handy. You may be reduced to the 
extremity of drinking water from 
cellar tanks, ice cube trays or rainfall. 

Drinking needn't be all grim if you 
supplement emergency rations with 
bottled soda or juices, as well as can- 
ned milk, soup and water-packed 
fruits. 

If the gas supply is cut off, cooking 
can be handled by canned heat or 
electrical appliances. 

While lighting needs can be met with 
candles or conventional flashlights, a 
new rechargeable flashlight is espe- 
cially excellent for emergencies. It 
can be recharged thousands of times 
by plugging into a wall socket or into 
the cigarette lighter of your car with 
a special adapter that is available. It 
lasts a lifetime and can mean the 
difference between light and darkness 
in an emergency. 

You may have to suffer a few days 
without electricity. But public utilities 
will always be quickly restored. If 
your family is sheltered underground, 
avoid burning candles or other air- 
eaters. 

Precooked foods are preferable for 
storage. If you haven't got a two-week 



supply on hand right now . . . start to 
accumulate it! Buy meal-in-one-dish 
foods, meats and fish. Fruit and vege- 
tables, cereals, crackers, hard candy, 
raisins, chocolate and other staples are 
recommended. Don't forget the can 
opener! If there are babies, sick or 
old people, provide special foods to 
serve their needs. 

You might find yourself with a 
loaded refrigerator or deep-freeze . . . 
and no electric power. Consume re- 
frigerated food first, then the frozen 
provisions. Plan strategically. Open 
your freezer just once a day to remove 
what you need. This lengthens the 
life of remaining stores. 

If you're in a fall-out shelter, don't 
be afraid to breathe the air coming 
through ventilators. Radioactive par- 
ticles are harmful, but they don't 
transmit their poison to the air. Put 
plenty of earth or concrete between 
yourself and fall-out to escape injury. 
Radioactive particles can be washed 
from the skin and clothes with soap 
and water. Find a way to bury the 
water afterwards. 

Your local sewer system may be 
temporarily knocked out. Damaged 
sewers can't dispose of human waste. 
Lack of garbage disposal encourages 
rats, flies and other disease carriers. 
Provide for such disagreeable possi- 
bilities. Tightly-covered containers 



will serve sanitary purposes. Drain 
garbage as dry as you can. Wrap it 
tightly in newspaper and pack it in- 
side a closed box. Bury it if possible. 

A battery-powered radio is essential. 
You and your family will feel less 
isolated if you can maintain communi- 
cations with the outside world. Di- 
rections for your speedy rescue may 
also come through by radio. 

You might keep money and docu- 
ments in a strong box, to be scooped 
up and carried along with the family 
. . . whether you're heading for a 
basement shelter, the rooftop or evac- 
uation facilities. 

Bedding and extra clothing should 
be included on your "Supplies for 
Survival" list. Add soap, eating gear, 
amusements. Cleanliness, refinement 
and diversion can work wonders for 
the morale of a trapped family. 

Tools should be kept handy. A 
shovel, crowbar, axe, wrench, screw- 
driver, hammer, nails and pliers should 
be enough. 

Surviving a crisis without gas. elec- 
tricity or telephone takes courage and 
planning. We sincerely hope that a 
few-hour snow, rain or wind emer- 
gency is the most you ever have to 
face. But if you value your life and 
the safety of your family, wake up to 
the need for preparation today! 



New President Meets with Labor Leaders on Inauguration Eve 




The new President on the day before his inauguration met 
with a group of labor leaders in the AFL-CIO building to 
express his thanks to organized labor for its strong support for 
the Kennedy-Johnson ticket in the last election campaign. 
General President M. A. Hutcheson was among those present 



at the session. He may be seen in the top right of the 
photo just between AFL-CIO General Counsel J. Albert 
Woll and Metal Trades Secretary -Treasurer B. A. Gritta. 
Cooperation with the new Administration was promised by 
the labor group. 



FEBRUARY, 1961 



21 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District, Ckarles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



The Constitution and Laws of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America spell out in detail the responsibilities 
of the Member, the Financial Secretary, and 
the General Secretary regarding a member's 
dues. Every member should understand these 
provisions thoroughly, since it is his member- 
ship, his right to benefits, and his union record 
that are at stake when dues are not kept paid 



in accordance with the Constitutional terms 
laid down by successive conventions. 

Dues are a prime obligation of union mem- 
bership. The ultimate responsibility for keep- 
ing dues properly paid — and thereby remain- 
ing in benefit standing — rests with the individ- 
ual member. The initiative must come from 
him. Let us keep our dues paid up properly 
and thereby avoid misunderstandings and the 
risk of arrearage and suspension. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



New Plywood Curtain Wall Developed 




IF you ever wondered why the 
wood industry never developed a 
curtain wall to compete with metals, 
glass, or what have you, you can quit 
worrying. Such a panel has been 
developed. 

An eye-catching new kind of build- 
ing material, sparkling white plastic- 
overlaid plywood that defies every 
weather extreme, is the unusual finish- 
ing touch on the just-completed 
$8,000,000 Memorial Coliseum in 
Portland, Ore. 

Designed by the internationally- 
■cnown architectural firm of Skidmore, 
Dwings & Merrill, the imposing 
tructure is an attractive blend of pure 
vhite factory-surfaced plywood and 
ray tinted glass in a multi-acre setting 
)f green grass and shrubs on the bank 
f the Willamette river. 

In capacity, it is in a class with 
Vladison Square Garden, Mgr. Don 
swell points out. 

The main building is 360 feet 
quare and 90 feet high, focal point 
or a huge amphitheater and addi- 
ional wood-paneled meeting rooms 
apable of handling major conven- 
iens. Seating accommodations are 
vailable for up to 14,000 persons in 
he main arena, and adjacent meeting 
ooms can accommodate an additional 
,700. 

The 129,600-square-foot roof struc- 
ure is upheld by only four support- 
ng columns. There are 96 laminated 
wooden mullions 9 inches thick, 40 
nches wide and 85 feet high sup- 
orting the curtain walls. 

The unusual white "fascia" around 
lie top of the main structure is a 22- 



foot high strip of ihe tough new 
acrylic-surfaced exterior plywood. It 
extends for well over a quarter mile 
along all four sides and is the world's 
largest application of its type. 

Requiring no initial painting or 
other surface treatment, the new over- 
laid plywood reduced on-the-job in- 
stallation costs substantially and will 
eliminate costly maintenance, the ply- 
wood industry leaders point out. 

Half-inch thick panels, factory 
finished and edge sealed, went into 
place quickly with crews applying 
them from a permanent traveling 
scaffold that moves on rails around 
the building's edge for future use by 
window washers. 

Because of its permanent tough 
plastic overlay, the three quarters of 
an acre of white plywood in the 
future will receive only an occasional 
inexpensive wash job by the Coli- 
seum's window washing crew. 

Architects and Coliseum officials 
are happy with the result. A low 
maintenance budget is assured in 
future years by such factors as elimi- 
nation of chemical corrosion, bending, 
tearing or rusting, combined with 
built-in structural strength of the ply- 
wood. 

The new plastic overlaid material 




is to be made in a number of colors, 
and it is expected to find its way into 
many fields, plywood officials said. 

Initial uses include all types of con- 
struction where an extremely durable 
and weather-resistant finish is required, 
such as for curtain walls, siding of all 
types, and even highway and railway 
signs. 



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The A meri ran Technical Sod et y , a 

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FEBRUARY, 1961 



2 3 



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Fishing "Bug" Bites Late 

Walter C. Rosel of Barington, Illi- 
nois, a member of the Carpenters' 
Union, Local 2014, didn't get the 
fishing bug 'til he was 71 years old. 

It all happened when he took off 
with three of his old time buddies to 
Clearwater Lake, up Canada way. 
They were experienced fishermen and 
liberal with their tips on how to catch 
the biggest and the most. They had 
the best equipment that money could 
buy, making Walt feel a little out of 
place with his fish bait, five-dollar reel 
and three-dollar rod. 

Needless to say, Walt was top man 
in the boat when the day's catch was 
counted and he's been a devotee to 
the gentle art ever since. 

Alteration is Illegal 

Varied are the ways of Fish and 
Game transgressors but one particular 
transgression by a California hunter 
stands out as unique. 

It appears that no matter how ar- 
tistic the effect, "altering a deer's ant- 
lers" is just as illegal as "altering a 
check." 

A Fairfield man paid $100 to find 
that out. 

He had killed an illegal deer, a 
spike, in Modoc county and then 
whittled one antler to make it look 
like a forked horn. The warden ad- 
mired the "art work" but not the lar- 
cenous intent. He commented that 
the antler was nicely done, "even to 
the darkening of the antler where it 
had been worked on." 

Nylon Advantages Praised 

Nylon was introduced into the fish- 
ing tackle scene in 1940. This began 
the era of longer casts with lighter 
lures. 

Nylon has the advantage of being 
less subject to decay than linen, cotton 
or hemp lines — lines made from vege- 
table matter and silk lines made from 
animal matter. 



The clear, small-diameter monofila- 
ment lines have the advantage of being 
almost invisible in the water. 

Ken/son Hits the Spot 

Everyone knows that venison, like 
the Thanksgiving turkey, is easy on the 
palate when garnished with cranberry 
sauce. But some of the residents of 
the Long Beach Peninsula in Washing- 
ton are way ahead of us ordinary folk. 
Their venison is cranberry flavored — 
on the hoof. 

Seems like the deer thereabouts 
have developed an enormous appetite 
for the luscious cranberries, and the 
farmers are expressing their feelings in 
terms not mentionable here. 




J. F. Bono has been a member of 
the Carpenters' Union, Local 690 in 
Little Rock, Arkansas, since 1916. 
Whenever time permits he's "out 
there" participating in his favorite out- 
door pursuits — hunting and fishing. 

On a visit to his son, J. C. Bono at 
Grants Pass, Oregon, they both took 
off for the high country thereabouts 
and came home with a pair of buck 
mule deer. 

Here's a photo of J. F. holding the 
rack of the mulie he downed. 

Deer Dressing Data 

Milt Clavey of Roanoke, Virginia 
downed a buck which dressed out at 
160 pounds. He wanted to know if 
we had any figures as to what the deei 
might have weighed on the hoof. 

I'd say that Milt's buck weighed in 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



the neighborhood of 203 pounds when 
alive. 

Following is a comparative chart 
on the "live" and "dressed" weight of 
deer as compiled from various sur- 
veys: 

DRESSED LIVE 

40 55 

50 67 

60 80 

70 92 

80 105 

90 117 

100 131 

110 140 

120 156 

130 166 

140 179 

150 190 

160 203 

170 215 

180 228 

190 240 

Ice Fishing Popular 

An increasingly popular sport as- 
sociated with the chill winter blasts 
is "ice fishing." 

It will become more popular as time 
goes by, especially when people lose 
that fear and dislike of the freezing 
cold. 

It's a great sport and if you dress 
properly you can keep warm and com- 
fortable. Wear lots of clothing, (you 



If * 



- 



3** 




:an always shed a bit if the weather 
warms) the light insulated variety, 

down" or "kapok." 

The body generates heat and proper 
rlothing will keep it there — and keep 

ou warm. 

One fisherman who plays the pis- 
:atorial "waiting game" 'round the 

raditional hole in the ice is Carpenter 
-eon D. Atkins of RD #1, Clay, 

Here's a snap of Leon with his 

;on Eddie, showing a 21 and 22 inch 
?ike he eased through the ice cover 
5f Oneida lake, Onondago county, 
Mew York. 

FEBRUARY, 1961 



Big Moose is Prize 

Howard Knowles of 516 Michigan 
Avenue, Sarnia, Ontario, was doing a 
little big-game stalking in the Paint 
Lake country of Ontario. Things were 
pretty quiet until the moment when 
a bull moose came charging out of the 
brush — straight toward him! 




Howard dropped the monster with 
one shot at 70 yards. 

Here's pictorial proof of the pud- 
din', Howard (right) with two of his 
hunting buddies and a 1,200 pound 
moose — off the hoof. 



Lands Record Wall-eye 

We're advised that a 25-pound wall- 
eye, probably a new world's rod-and- 
reel record for the species was taken 
from Old Hickory lake near Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Mabry Harper of Hartsville. Tenn., 
hooked the lunker with a steelback 
minnow. 

The walleye was 41 inches in length 
and 29 inches in girth. It was identi- 
fied as a walleye by technicians of the 
Tennessee Game and Fish Commis- 
sion. 



School with a Heart 

A school in New Hampshire official- 
ly recognizes the desire of youngsters 
to be out on the stream for the begin- 
ning of the fishing season. The school 
kids get the whole day off for the 
opening of trout season on May 1st. 
In addition to that, that school has 
a trout breakfast with the young Wal- 
tonians cleaning their catch and turn- 
ing them over to the home economics 
class for a frying job. 

Wonder if the plea of a New Hamp- 
shire truant officer had anything to do 
with the trout-opening school holiday? 



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25 




. . l f:~ M 

Varied shapes in metal can be achieved through use of the 
new techniques of explosives. 



a noise for news 




26 



By John R. Hayes 

TWO men crouched over an intersection of track be- 
longing to the New York Central System. Working 
swiftly and deftly, they fitted an explosive charge and 
blasting cap to the steel insert linking the rails. Then 
they backed away a safe distance, attached the firing wire 
to a detonator and waited impassively for the signal to 
depress the plunger. 

Saboteurs? Robbers? Lunatics? 

Not at all. They were employees of the road applying 
new discoveries in modern metallurgy. 

Explosives, man's most powerful instruments of destruc- 
tion, are being used these days in two significantly construc- 
tive ways: 

To make steel and other metals extra hard when spe- 
cial jobs demand it; 

to form tough superalloys into complex shapes when 
conventional techniques won't do the trick. 
Steel inserts — more often called "frogs" — guide train 
wheels from one track to another. Subject to tremendous 
pressures, they are made of austenitic manganese steel, a 
metal that "work hardens" easily. In fact, when it is 
hammered or rolled while cold it becomes harder and 
stronger. 

Big Bang! An explosive shock in a millionth of a second 
builds a shock wave with a peak pressure of 2 million pounds 
per square inch and quadruples the life of this steel rail frog. 

THE CARPENTER 



Unfortunately, however, attempts to 
depth harden finished manganese steel 
products by mechanical means with- 
out grossly deforming them have been 
generally unsuccessful. Nor is the 
steel susceptible to hardening by heat 
treatment, the usual method of hard- 
ening steel. 

Until recently railroad engineers 
had to be satisfied with frogs hard- 
ened in use. The same pounding 
wheels that gradually wore a frog 
down also hardened the surface of 
the steel, giving it a life expectancy 
of three or four years. 

Now. with explosives, the life of a 
frog can be quadrupled in minutes 
for about $3. Savings are consider- 
able: a replacement frog costs $1,200, 
plus costs in labor and lost traffic 
time. 

Increases in the hardness of man- 
ganese steel have been detected two 
inches below the surface, and New 
York Central research engineers be- 
lieve tensile strength can be more than 
doubled if a large enough charge 
is used. 

EXPLOSIVES are also being used 
to form metals. The process, al- 
though still an industrial infant, is 
gaining wide acceptance in areas 
where forming techniques on conven- 
tional equipment — such as drop ham- 



mers, hydro presses and brake presses 
— are either difficult, impossible or 
uneconomical to use. For example: 

• Conventional forming techniques 
demand heavy capital investment 
in equipment, and the size of the 
equipment limits the size of the 
part it can form in one piece. 
Very little heavy equipment is 
needed for explosive forming. 

• When production runs are short, 
as in the forming of components 
for aircraft and missile proto- 
types, high tooling costs greatly 
increase costs per part. Explo- 
sive forming halves tooling costs. 

• Cylindrical, conical, corrugated, 
angled and embossed shapes often 
cannot be formed in one opera- 
tion by mechanical means. A 
shroud assembly, mechanically 
formed, consisted of 129 spot- 
welded parts; the same assembly 
was explosively formed as a sin- 
gle unit. 

• Because "super alloys" work 
harden when hammered or 
pressed, the part must be made 
slowly and must be annealed to 
resoften it at various stages. It 
took ten hours and two annealing 
operations to form a conical part 
for a jet engine; the same part 
was explosively formed in 1 5 
minutes without annealing. 



• Mechanically formed parts 
"spring back": that is, they do 
not remain in close conformity to 
the die. An explosively formed 
part is a snug fit. 

• Mechanical pressures cannot al- 
ways be evenly distributed; there- 
fore formation must stop when 
maximum stress develops in any 
one area. An explosive shock 
wave spreads evenly and instan- 
taneously in all directions, caus- 
ing maximum stress to be applied 
to the metal area. 

Time and research will undoubt- 
edly refine understanding and applica- 
tion of the art. 

Experiments conducted by E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours & Company and 
by American Potash & Chemical Cor- 
poration's National Northern Divi- 
sion have shown, for instance, that 
explosives can be used to forge, cold- 
weld, cut, pierce, heat treat, extrude, 
emboss, elongate and smooth metals. 

And if a way is found to apply ex- 
plosives to automated assembly pro- 
duction, the process may replace 
mechanical equipment in many form- 
ing operations. 

Where explosives metallurgy goes 
from here is anyone's guess. But it 
would be a good idea to guess big. — 
Reprinted through courtesy of Steel- 
ways magazine. 




These four photographs show steps taken in the use of the new technique of explosives in the 
formation and shaping of metals. The unit is immersed before being subject to the supercharge. 




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THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and pub- 
lished. Send along your pet trick for 
making a job easier. It can earn you 
five dollars and the gratitude of your 
fellow members. Include a rough sketch 
from which we can make a drawing. 

When the same idea is submitted by 
more than one reader, the letter with the 
earliest postmark will be awarded the 
$5.00 check for the tip. This will ex- 
plain why somebody else's name may 
appear on a tip you sent in. 



Handy Wax Corner 

My pet trick is to drill a half inch 
hole one inch in depth in the end of 
my finish hammer. In this hole I put 




wax; it sure comes in handy when 
I need wax for screws, nails, brads, 
especially when working with hard 
woods. 

Robert R. Hauser 
(L.U. 13, Chicago, 111.) 
201 S. Hi-Lusi Ave. 
Mt. Prospect, 111. 



Sawing Through Nails 

Here is a trick which I learned, 
but had to lose a bet to learn it. The 
bet was that a nail could be cut 
through without dulling the teeth of 
a regular wood-cutting handsaw. 

To accomplish this, simply nick up 
the back edge of the saw blade with 
a chisel, file, hammer claw or any 
such hard-edged tool. Use the 




roughed-up section to cut through the 
nail. This trick has helped me many 
times and has certainly proved to be 
a bet worth losing. 

Carl Blum 

L.U. 195 

Spring Valley, 111. 

Avoiding Hammer Marks 

I would like to submit a useful 
trick for use when working on fine 
finish items such as jambs, casings, 
panels etc. and you want to safeguard 
against ugly hammer marks. 

Take a piece of quarter-inch ply- 
wood about two by four inches and 




/a" x //z" gi«r 



with a wide saw make a cut down the 
middle (see drawing). This cut can 
be slipped over a started nail and the 
nail can be driven in to within a quar- 
ter of an inch. The rest of the way 
can be handled with a nail set. Thus 
the plywood absorbs any blows should 
the hammer slip and thereby prevents 
marks or scars on the finish. 

Robert O'Toole 

1 Russell St. 

Canton, Mass. 

L.U. 33, Boston, Mass. 




16" 



Easy Space Measuring 

I'd like to describe a job-saving 
trick I have found useful. This is a 
quick method for measuring spacing 
when installing base or wallboard. 

Place hammer on rule or square 
with handle perpendicular, roll on 
claws until horizontal; notch or mark 
at 16 in. By repeating this operation, 
you will get location of studs when 
spaced 16 in. o.c. 

James E. Wilson 

24 Louisa St. 

L.U. 281 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

THE CARPENTER 




Glue by the roll is now available 
with Plyophen 2000-PGL, a new film- 
supported, phenolic, industrial ad- 
hesive developed by Reichhold Chemi- 
cals, Inc. Layups of alternating ma- 



"Unispec Twins" Safety Spectacles 
are made to fit every face easily and 
comfortably, it is said. Two models 
cover five bridge sizes. Model 7446 
fits 18, 20 and 22-mm bridge sizes; 




Model 7448 fits 22, 24 and 26-mm 
bridge sizes. Each model is said to fit 
a 22-mm size. Made by Glendale 
Optical Co., 600 W. Merrick Rd., Val- 
ley Stream, N. Y. 

This new American Standard Screw 
Gauge calibrates both wood and ma- 
chine screws in sizes from No. 2 to 
No. 14. It is made of 1/16" high 
finish, strip steel and can also cali- 
brate round stock from 1/16" to 1/4" 






PBkw 


















































i 








by 32r 
and q 
Manu 
facturi 
Minne 

FEBB 


ids. Furth 
uickly esti 
actured by 
ng Co., : 
apolis 7, P 

■ UARY, 


;r, 64ths can 
mated, it is 
D. A. Roger 

2824 13th t 
4inn. 

1961 


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Vve 


:as 
me 

[an 

> > 


iy 

d. 
u- 

s., 




terials to be bonded and adhesive 
sheets may be stored before hot press- 
ing or high frequency curing. Fast, 
clean and easy to handle, the new 
product eliminates need for glue 
spreader, provides complete control 
over adhesive flow, and cures rapidly, 
it is claimed. The line consists of 38, 
50, and 62-inch width, useful in 
making plywood and in bonding 
veneers, plastic or metal sheets to ply- 
wood, particle board and honeycombs. 
For information write Charles Ma- 
thieu & Co., 509 Madison Ave., New 
York 22, N. Y. 




The manufacturer of the washable 
ScottFoam air filter claims it greatly 
eases the furnace cleaning chore. 
Based on the Scott Paper Company's 
patented Polyurethane foam, the air 
filter is said to offer little resistance to 
air flow, yet has high efficiency and 
dust-holding capacity through its 
"depth-loading" properties. It features 
a double wall of foam and a zipper 
opening to permit removal of the re- 
taining frame. The filter may be 
washed by hand or machine with 
household soaps, solvents or deter- 
gents, wrung dry, and replaced in the 
frame. It does not require oiling or 
other treatment, is non-allergic and 
non-toxic. It comes in 4 standard sizes 
and is made by Auto-Flo Corporation. 
Detroit. Mich. For information, write 
Fred Halpern, National Aniline, Di- 
vision of Allied Chemical Co., 61 
Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 



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29 



Suffolk D. C. Invests In FHA Mortgages 




George Babcock (left), Administrator of Suffolk County Carpenters' Welfare Fund, 
presents first investment check for FHA-insured home mortgages to Herman Maass, 
President of Security National Bank of L. I. Witnessing the ceremony are Frederick 
E. Gibson (3rd from left), of Long Island Home Builders Institute and co-chairman 
of the Welfare Fund; and Edward Regnell of Nassau-Suffolk Contractors Assn., 
Chairman, Welfare Fund Committee. 



The Suffolk County (N. Y.) District 
Council of Carpenters has joined the 
growing list of labor organizations 
investing welfare fund reserves in 
FHA mortgages. The December issue 
of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 
OF HOME BUILDERS JOURNAL 
carried a story outlining the Suffolk 
County program. 

In a letter to THE CARPENTER 
George Babcock, secretary-treasurer 
of the District Council and adminis- 
trator of the Suffolk County Carpen- 
ters Welfare Fund, gave the following 
account of the organization's decision: 

'"As you are probably aware, the 
mortgage situation was very tight and 
the field of home building in our area, 
along with many others, suffered be- 



cause of this. The Suffolk County 
Carpenters Welfare Fund, after num- 
erous discussions, felt that perhaps 
they could help their members and 
the home building field and construc- 
tion generally by investing some 
monies in these FHA-insured mort- 
gages and at the same time receive a 
high rate of interest which will enable 
the Fund at a later date to provide 
additional benefits to the members of 
the District Council." 

The trustees of the Council's Wel- 
fare Fund thus killed two birds with 
one stone. They helped to loosen the 
mortgage market to encourage home 
building, and at the same time guar- 
anteed the Fund a safe and profitable 
return on investment. 




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suration problems • Estimating strength of timbers •_ 
How to set girders and sills • How to frame houses and\Vi 
roofs • How to estimate costs • How to build houses.iWJ 
barns, garages, bungalows, etc. • How to read and drawW^ 
plans • Drawing up specifications • How to excavate™ 
■ How to use settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square* 

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30 



THE CARPENTER 




Billings Local Pins Veteran Members 




At its 1960 picnic. Local Union No. of veteran members. In the above pic- 

1172, Billings, Mont., took time out hire pins are being handed out to 12 

from the festivities and fellowship to 25-year members and two 50-year 

award recognition pins to a fine group veterans. 



Sheffield Fetes 32 Veterans 




On Monday, November 7, 1960, Shef- 
field. Ala., Carpenters' Local 109 pre- 
sented 32 members with 25-year pins. 
The presentation was made by Brother 
George Mitchell, Director of Southern 
States Organizing office of Atlanta, 
Georgia. The members are as follows: 
from left to right, D. H. Robinson, 
Robert Bowling, Thomas Lee, C. J. Wil- 
liamson, J. M. Voorhies, John C. Pace, 
Dan C. Johnson, Fred B. Isom, S. T. 
Ingram, F. A. Eckl, C. R. Couch: Second 
row, M. A. McMeans, Ben Driver, E. 

FEBRUARY, 1961 



F. Tidwell, A. C. Futrell, W. P. Fuller, 

B. B. Bryan, W. K. Zehner, A. E. Cooke: 
Third row, J. R. Pounders, George 
Mitchell, Director of Southern States 
Organizing office, Cecil B. Stout, Busi- 
ness Representative, David H. Thomas. 
President, O. L. Smith, J. C. Varnell, J. 
M. Kent A. A. Tucker, T. T. White, 
Roy L. Moore, Recording Secretary. G. 

C. Stover, Neil Cox, Oscar Enlow, H. E. 
Gatlin. E. E. Freeman and Ernest B. 
Shook. 



Outstanding Graduates 
Feted at Saginaw Valley 

Year by year, Saginaw Valley is 
changing. New buildings go up and old 
ones come down as time makes them 
obsolete. What Saginaw Valley will look 
like 20 or 30 years from now, no one 
can predict. But one thing is certain: 
craftsmen trained by the Saginaw Valley 
Carpenters District Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee will be making the changes 
in the skyline of this Michigan com- 
munity. 

Twenty-eight new ' journeymen car- 
penters from Saginaw, Flint. Bay City 
and Midland were welcomed into the 
fold at ceremonies held in Saginaw, and 
sponsored by the Saginaw Valley District 
Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee. Some 75 members, graduates, 
and guests were on hand for this Second 
Annual Apprentice Commencement Ex- 
ercise. The 28 young men who have 
successfully completed their four years 
of intensive on-the-job training and re- 
lated schooling in carpentry were guests. 

One of the high spots of the evening 
was the selection of Daniel Wheaton of 




Flint as Outstanding Apprentice of the 
Year. The award was a $25 gift certi- 
ficate, compliments of Saginaw's Tri-City 
Builders and Traders Exchange. 

Of special interest to guests was the 
appearance of Dr. Ernest R. Britton, 
Superintendent of Midland Schools, 
whose address was not only informative 
but delivered in a friendly manner which 
won the approval of everybody. 

Members of the Saginaw Valley 
Builders Association, headed by Donald 
Trier of Saginaw, joined with union 
members, school officials, and govern- 
ment representatives in welcoming the 
graduates to the rank of full-fledged 
craftsmen. Completion Certificates, is- 
sued by the U.S. Dept. of Labor's 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, 
were presented by Edward C. Prast. U.S. 
Training Consultant, and Mr. Trier. 

Lapel pins of the International Union 
were awarded to graduates, and a 10- 
foot Mezur Matic steel tape was pre- 
sented to each by Lufkin Rule. 

Frank Gerace of Midland. Chairman 
of the Apprenticeship Committee, was 
toastmaster. William Blalock. Commit- 
tee Secretary, was in charge of planning. 
Other Apprenticeship Committee mem- 
bers participating were: Earl Geister. 
Ray Johnson, Forest Billingsley. Bud 
Vollmer. Robert Jones, Peter Stukkie. 
Stanley Boyce. Charles Palmer, and 
Crawford Spencer. 



31 



Dallas Local Celebrates 75th Birthday 




Last Labor Day, Local Union No. 
198, Dallas, Tex., selected a novel way 
to celebrate the day. The union spon- 
sored a 75th Anniversary Luncheon and 
used the occasion to pay tribute to a 
large list of tried and true old time 
members. Of the 19 veteran members 
honored, all but five were able to be 
present at the gathering held in the 
Baker Hotel. 

Many distinguished guests attended the 
luncheon. Among them were George 
Brown, assistant to president George 
Meany of the AFL-CIO, and District 
Court Judge Sarah T. Hughes who for 
many years has been a good friend of 
the labor movement and a staunch de- 



fender of it against those who seek to 
tear it down. 

Press and TV gave the luncheon good 
coverage and the many members who 
attended were so enthusiastic they want 
to make it an annual affair. 

Local No. 198 is one of the oldest 
labor organizations in the Southwest. Its 
charter is signed by J. G. Billingsley as 
General President and Peter J. McGuire 
as General Secretary. Over the years the 
union has chalked up an enviable record 
of public service to the community. 
Pictures of civic projects on which the 
union volunteered free labor were ex- 
hibited in the foyer of the hotel during 
the luncheon. 



St. Paul Unions Emulate St. Paul 




Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
made a substantial contribution to the 
success of the project which provided the 
much needed cabins for the youth camp. 

All labor was donated by building and 
construction trade union members and 
equipment was furnished by a group of 
construction contractors. Union mem- 
bers volunteered their aid in the youth 
service project and executives of the 
contractor firms worked side by side 
with them weekends. 

A total of almost 9,000 work hours 
was contributed by 485 members of the 
various unions cooperating in the pro- 
gram, and in recognition of their service 
bronze plaques, engraved with the names 
of participating unions, were unveiled at 
the dedication ceremonies. They will be 
made permanent displays on boulders 
on the campsite. 

A statement of appreciation by 
YMCA officials was expressed at the 
ceremonies which also marked the 50th 
anniversary of the youth camp. 

Construction materials and equipment 
for the cabins were donated by Mr. and 
Mrs. F. E. Weyerhaeuser, the Cosmopoli- 
tan Club of St. Paul, and Businessman 
Emil Kobb. 

A bank official termed the project "An 
outstanding example of Christian Broth- 
erhood." 

Active in organizing union participa- 
tion were Neil Sherburne, Secretary- 
Treasurer Minnesota Federation; Dick 
Radman, Secretary, Building Trades 
Council; Harry Anderson Business Rep- 
resentative, Carpenters Local #87; G. 
W. Christenson, Bricklayers Local 1; 
and Bud Loberg, Building Laborers Lo- 
cal #132. 



An outstanding instance of teamwork 
between organized labor and manage- 
ment made a bit of history last fall 
when twelve new residence cabins were 



dedicated at the St. Paul, Minnesota 
YMCA Camp, St. Croix, near Hudson, 
Wisconsin. 

Members of St. Paul Local 87, United 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 
Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas City, 

Mo 24, 25 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 10 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III. . 18 
Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

18, 28, 30 
Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. . 10 
Reed & Knause, Inc., Columbus, 

Ohio 29 

Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, III. 30 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, III 23 

Audel Publishers, New York, N. Y. 30 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, III 8 

Cline-Sigmon, Publishers, Hickory, 
N. C 29 

L. F. Garlinghouse Co., Inc., 
Topeka, Kans 10 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. ... 28 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing, New 
York, N. Y 15 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



How to Acquire 
a Permanent 
Savings Habit 
in Minutes 



Learning to save isn't the easiest 
thing in the world. But thousands 
of Americans have discovered a 
way that requires no learning — 
buying U. S. Bonds on Payroll 
Savings. Just ask your company's 
bond officer to set aside any 
amount you wish each payday. 
You'll be surprised how little it 
changes your spending habits — 
and how quickly your savings will 
grow. Try it and see! 

U.S. SAVINGS BONDS ARE MORE 
THAN A GOOD WAY TO SAVE 

You save automatically with the 
Payroll Savings Plan. 

You now get 3%% interest at ma- 
turity. 

You invest without risk under a 
U.S. Government guarantee. 

Your money can't be lost or stolen. 

You can get your money, with in- 
terest, anytime you want it. 

You save more than money — you 
help your Government pay for peace. 

Buy Bonds where vou work or bank. 



NOW every Savings Bond you own —old 
or new —earns H % more than ever before. 




Just sign your name and you're saving! Buying u. S. Bonds on 

payroll savings requires no "saving skill." Your payroll 
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, v si»e , 



%*^ 



You Save More Than Money 
With U.S. Savings Bonds 



The U.S. Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department thank' 
The Advertising Council and this magazine for their patriotic donation. 






The good things of life— including 
Peace— cost money 

Every Bond dollar you set aside 

for a new home, education, 

retirement, helps build national 

security ... so you can enjoy the 

good things you've saved for. 






You don't lose a penny if 

your Bonds are lost or 
destroyed. Since 1941, 
1,300.000 Bonds have been 
replaced by the Treasury 
Department at no cost to 
the owners. 



What is 




What is Brotherhood? 

It is everything, or everything is nothing. It is the catalyst that separates a human being from the beast of the jungle. 
It is the leavening of love and the scaffolding upon which society rests. It is the glowing light which has beckoned man- 
kind along the tortuous path of progress from the law of the fang to the Bill of Rights. It is the cornerstone of Democ- 
racy and the fountainhead of human dignity. It is the strength of the past and the hope of the future. 

What is Brotherhood? 

It is the biggest thing in the world and at the same time the smallest. It is a thousand union men walking a picket line 
for weeks or months to redress an injustice done to a single member. But also it is a housewife baking a cake for an 
ailing neighbor. It is battered and beaten Gl's with bone-weary arms and frozen feet carrying wounded comrades out 
of the frigid wastes of Korea. But also it is a vigorous young carpenter giving a lift to a tired old-timer working by his 
side. It is a hundred and fifty million people placing their homes, their savings and even their lives at the disposal of 
the nation to protect the principles of liberty and equality. But no less it is Bill Smith mowing the lawn of the old couple 
up the street. It is a dozen or a hundred or a thousand people working together to maintain a church or a lodge or a 
union. It is the fifty cent contribution or the hour of committee work given by the least of them. 

What is Brotherhood? 

It is the wisdom of Lincoln and the warmth of Ghandi. It is the humility of Jesus, the humbleness of Mohammed and 
the humanitarianism of Confucius. It is Catholic and Protestant and Jew living together in peacefulness and harmony. 
It is Italian and Dane and Bulgarian and Pole working side by side on the job and sitting shoulder to shoulder in the 
union hall searching for ways to advance the common good. It is the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount. 
It is the Bible, the Talmud and the Koran. It is the essence of all wisdom of all ages distilled into a single word. But 
equally it is the understanding of neighbors and friends who sorrow at your misfortunes and rejoice at your triumphs. 
You cannot see Brotherhood; neither can you hear it or taste it. But you can feel it a hundred times a day. It is the 
pat on the back when things look gloomy. It is the smile of encouragement when the way seems hard. It is the helping 
hand when the burden becomes unbearable. 

What is Brotherhood? 

It is pioneer Americans of faiths and creeds and colors banding together to raise a barn for a neighbor. It is men in 
leather breeches and homespun shirts taking wagons apart and carrying them over the mountains, piece by piece, to 
get wagon trains into California and Oregon. It is working men risking their jobs, their homes and their futures to build 
unions capable of eliminating exploitation and poverty and industrial slavery. It is men and women working for a com- 
mon cause that is bigger than any individual. 

What is Brotherhood? 

It is the hope of mankind for immortality. Man comes into the world from whence he knows not. He struggles a while 
and departs again into whence he knows not. But like the tiny crustaceans which create the magnificent coral reefs, 
he makes a tiny contribution to the universal plan. The coral comes into the world, lives awhile, and then dies to add 
its tiny skeleton to the skeletons of millions of generations which went before. In the end, a beautiful coral island rises 
out cf the sea. Like the coral, man comes into the world to live awhile and eventually pass on. Like the coral, he makes 
his contribution to the universal plan. Brotherhood is the mortar that holds together the contributions of all men in 
all ages. 

What is Brotherhood? 

It is not life. It is more than that. It is that which gives meaning to life and makes it worth living. 



That is Brotherhood. 



"/ see to every icind unfurled 

The Flag that bears the Maple Wreath . . ." 

Charles G. D. Roberts, (1860-1944) "Canada" 







$g"£.2"82arg.S"ffia \ 



CARPENTER 




THE COVER 

Queen Victoria settled the designation of the Canadian 
capital, Ottawa, in 1857; the city had been renamed 
from Bytown two years earlier. The first Parliament 
buildings were erected 1 860-66. The center block, with 
the exception of the library, was destroyed by fire in 1916. 
Rebuilding was started at once and the rebuilding job 
completed by about 1920. The Parliament Buildings are 
magnificently set on 35-acre park area, Parliament Hill, 
with Peace Tower, the central section, dominating the 
horizon. The present building has six floors and 490 
rooms; it is 470 feet long and 245 feet wide. At 10:15 a.m. 
daily the Changing the Guard ceremony takes place from 
July to September. This is one of the most colorful 
ceremonies in North America. 

(Photo courtesy Canadian Information Service) 



&jsm& 




United Brotherhood op Carpenters and Joiners of America 



CANADA is experiencing a full- 
blown depression this winter. 
Approximately one person out of 10 
is currently unemployed, and the fig- 
ure may climb to one out of seven 
before the expected spring upturn 
makes itself felt. Understandably, 
Canadian labor is insistent that gov- 
ernment programs be developed 
promptly to get the economic gears 
meshing again. 

The economies of the United 
States and Canada are inter-dependent 
to an amazing degree. The economy 
of each nation is extremely sensitive 
to changes occurring in the other. 

There is another area in which 
Canadian industry "is sensitive to de- 
velopments across the border. That 
area is anti-labor legislation. Every 
anti-labor law passed in the United 
States soon brings a rash of employer 
propaganda for a similar law in 
Canada. The name of the law may 
be changed but its intent is not. 

As a matter of fact, it is amazing 
how close the coordination of effort 
is on a world-wide basis where profits 
are concerned. We still remember a 
Canadian company which had a sub- 
sidiary factory in Norway during the 
war. In its annual report the com- 
pany announced it was "happy to 
report" that its Norwegian subsidiary 
was unharmed by the German in- 
vasion and was operating full blast. 
The fact that the factory was turning 
out munitions for the Germans to 
throw at Canadian boys apparently 
seemed less important than the fact 
the property was not destroyed. 

All this points up the need for a 
close-knit labor movement embracing 
both nations. 



VOLUME LXXXI 



Peter Terzick, Editor 
MARCH, 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

Economic Pearl Harbor 

Tacoma Story, Part II 

What Wonders God Hath Wrought 

Canadian Section 

Building Progress Report 



NO. 3 



DEPARTMENTS 


2 


Washington Roundup 


12 


Editorials 


19 


In Memoriam 


22 


Official Page 


23 


Plane Gossip 


25 


Budget Battle 


26 


Local Union News 


30 


To the Ladies 


31 


Short-Cuts 


32 


In Conclusion 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Chance of address cards on Form 3579-P should be sent to THE 
CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N. E„ Washington 18. D. C. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20< in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



S32 

=%5!s^\WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



'e>_e e <=> o. © 



CONSTRUCTION GETS PRIORITY Washington sees construction as big news these days. 
Not only is the building and construction industry important as usual in the good 
health of the economy, but the industry has special importance these days in an 
effort to pump some life and spirit back into the body politic. 

Construction indices are the first to be considered by Government and 
private economists when they size up the economy. If the construction picture 
looks good, the outlook is good. If, on the other hand, construction shows a 
slow growth and is lagging behind expectations, we may well know that we are in 
for some stormy weather. 

We are living in an age in which dynamic growth is necessary for survival 
and prosperity. There is no standing still; either we grow and expand or we fall 
back and decline. Construction is the basic underpinning of growth. Construction 
is looked to for the new plants for manufacture, for warehouses for distribution, 
for commercial establishments for service, for schools for education, for 
hospitals and laboratories for therapy and research and for a host of other 
modern necessities. 

While we as Carpenters realize the importance of construction in our own 
work, we should realize that this importance goes far beyond our own trade and 
is basic to our national good health. 

AGENCY SHOP PROBLEM The National Labor Relations Board decision by a 3-2 vote 
undercutting the agency shop procedure as developed in the state of Indiana is 
causing considerable hard thinking in labor circles in Washington. It should be 
noted that in the three-man majority of the Board were included two members who 
are soon to depart: Chairman Boyd Leedom will leave March 28 and Arthur A. 
Kimball, member, will leave shortly since he is serving on a recess appointment. 
President John F. Kennedy has already named Frank McCulloch, administrative as- 
sistant to Senator Paul H. Douglas, as the new NLRB chairman. 

The political realities of the situation would certainly indicate that the 
two members would be replaced by two with somewhat differing and less reactionary 
views. While we cannot predict what a member will do after he gets on the Board, 
it would seem a safe bet that Kennedy would not name two reactionaries and his 
nomination of McCulloch certainly bears out this premise. 

A rehearing and reconsideration of the agency shop decision will be 
sought. We hope this situation is cleared up shortly since a real clarification, 
favorable to labor, can mean much to the labor movement in right to work states. _ 

UNIONISM AWARD Last month in Washington awards were made in the annual 
Heywood Broun contest conducted by the American Newspaper Guild and the winners 
turned out copy which has special significance to building trades unions. While 
it might be expected that the winning pieces would be significant, we think those 
for the current prize have special bearing on our present day problems. 

Frank Drea and Harry Allen of the Toronto, Can., Telegram won first prize 
and a $500 check for a series of articles exposing the exploitation of immigrant 
labor on construction jobs in Toronto. Five men died in a cave-in and this acci- 
dent and other developments led to a searching investigation by the two reporters 
of the Telegram. The resulting expose led to unionization of the jobs and a 
general reform in safety procedures and a boost in wages and standard of working 
conditions of construction men. We add our congratulations to a job well done 
in the construction field. 

2 THE CARPENTER 



BUSY PACESETTERS The White House and top level Cabinet Departments are busy 
pacesetters for the rest of the Government, if the activity in February is any 
criterion. Among activities of President John F. Kennedy during the month were: 
directed a crackdown on loose "missile gap talk" ; pledged support to NATO ; estab- 
lished Child Health Center in Public Health Service; sent Congress a message on 
temporary jobless benefits; asked Congress for a new minimum wage bill; sent an . 
omnibus health bill for action; outlined an 18-point program to halt loss through 
outflow of gold; directed an acceleration of grain storage program ; called for 
cooperation of industry; wired state Governors to speed road money spending to 
help on situation; asked for raise in feed-grain price supports; established a 21- 
member committee on labor and management (purely advisory) ; sent Congress a 
comprehensive education bill; began receiving foreign visitors (Germany, Denmark, 
Canada etc.) ; planned trip to Canada; intervened in a couple of critical 
strikes. The President and his Cabinet Secretaries are moving rapidly on several 
fronts and February is apparently just a prelude to more to come. 



HOUSING GROWTH The Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, has made 
public a census of the nation's housing units and the figures turn up some inter- 
esting data. The nation as a whole between census periods, that is between 1950 
and 1960 increased its housing units by 27 per cent. Some states were well above 
this figure and many were below it as the details listed show. 

We have as of now 58,581,841 housing units as against 46,137,076 in 1950. 
The leading gainers were, of course, the states with the most rapidly expanding 
populations. Among the percentage gainers were Alaska with a whopping 99 per cent 
increase; Arizona with 73.2; Florida with 95.1 and Nevada with 81.7. 

Progress was also slow in some areas. Arkansas showed a 2.2 per cent 
increase, lowest in the U. S. ; Mississippi 3.4 and West Virginia 5.8. 

The top states, as one might expect, were the big states and while they did 
not coincide with the big gainers (except California) they account for big 
sectors of the physical plant of the nation's housing. As of 1960 New York 
topped the country with 5,699,538 units; California with a 52.5 per cent gain 
jumped into second place with 5,477,197 units; Pennsylvania has 3,596,259, 
Illinois has 3,286,149, Texas 3,160,298 and Ohio 3,052,958. 

Among the states with fewest number of units were Alaska with 65,807 and 
Vermont with 136,566. 



NEW MIGRATORY DRIVE One of the activities of the Kennedy Administration which 
is bound to kick up some political static is that of the new drive in behalf of 
one of America's submerged groups — the migratory agricultural workers. The 
Administration is cracking down, or will be cracking down, on violations and the 
Department of Labor is expected to step up its enforcement work. At its mid-winter 
meeting the AFL-CIO Executive Council voted to continue a vigorous organizing 
drive in the agricultural laborers field. California vegetable areas are the 
first targets in both the AFL-CIO organization drive and in the Labor Depart- 
ment's vigorous action. 



NEW UNION MATERIALS The AFL-CIO is making new material available to unions 
which should be of special interest to education directors and others charged 
with the responsibility of programming items for general information. Two new 
pamphlets on aging are available: "Medical Care for the Aged", Pub. No. 115, and 
"Aging — Basic Needs and Programs", Pub. No. 114. These can be ordered from the 
AFL-CIO, Department of Publications, 815 16th St., NW, Washington 6, D. C. Single 
copies are free ; up to 100 copies are three cents each and in quantity they are 
$2.95 per 100. 

The AFL-CIO Education Department is making available at a $7.50 film rental 
fee the famous migratory workers' picture called "Harvest of Shame". This is 
the famous Columbia Broadcasting System documentary on the plight of the migrant 
workers and is narrated by Edward R. Murrow. This is a powerful film and has 
aroused attention and controversy throughout the country. 

MARCH, 1961 3 



LOW WAGE IMPORTS WREATEH 

economic 

PBARL HARBOi 



A<H 



gi rni^Hiinii^ 





m 

M 




IF someone asks you what our major 
export to West Germany is, you 
can truthfully answer "Jobs". West 
Germany is a growing magnet for 
American businesses. According to 
recent figures, one new United States 
firm, on the average, is setting up 
shop in West Germany every three 
weeks. And all indications are the 
pace is going to quicken. Recently, a 
prominent U. S. businessman was 
quoted as saying: 



STATE BURE 





IBuy American $1} 
THE Joe You Save 8*< 
IMflr Be your Own 







aaee*^ 



"If the recession at home gets 
tougher, there's only one thing many 
American companies can do to save 
their necks — get to Germany as fast as 
possible and into a market that's really 
expanding." 

It is estimated that U. S. business 
firms invested better than 8.3 billion 
dollars in Common Market countries 
between 1955 and 1959— the bulk of 
it in West Germany. This is around 
2 billion dollars a year. 

The Chamber of Commerce likes 
to brag that it takes an investment of 
around $18,000 to provide one job. 
Applying this formula to investments 
made in Common Market countries, 
about 120,000 jobs were exported an- 
nually to Germany and the German 
complex. 

No wonder there is a vast shortage 
of workers in West Germany at the 
very time 5,000,000 U. S. citizens and 
600,000 Canadians cannot find jobs. 
Average wages in West Germany are 
about 50^ an hour. 

For years, organized labor — par- 
ticularly our Brotherhood — has de- 
cried this export of American jobs. 



But no one in government or upper 
echelons of policy-making bodies wor- 
ried very much. However, now that 
our gold reserves (and not just jobs 
of ordinary citizens) are endangered, 
the problem is getting some official 
recognition. 

Away back in 1954, Second Gen- 
eral Vice President O. William Blaier 
warned in an article in THE CAR- 
PENTER that unrestricted imports 
from Japan could bring on an eco- 
nomic Pearl Harbor. 

In his article Brother Blaier said: 
"Ever since the end of World War 
II the United States and Canada have 
carried the economies of the free 
world through foreign aid programs. 
We were able to do this because all 
of our people were working. It took 
tax money to do the job, but no one 
complained. With the aid we have 
been providing, most countries have 
been able to advance their productivity 
to points well above those which 
existed before the war. In the manu- 
facture of electrical equipment, for 
example, seven European countries 



THE CARPENTER 




have pushed productivity to 33V6 % 
above 1938 levels. 

"So long as all our people continue 
working, the foreign aid program can 
be continued. But once our people are 
thrown out of work by low-wage 
foreign imports, only world-wide de- 
pression can result. 

". . . The free-traders have a power- 
ful story to tell. They maintain that 
allowing Japanese plywood to enter 
this country, with little or no tariff 
will enable Japanese plywood workers 
to buy more American stoves and 
refrigerators and radios. In theory it 
sounds fine — everybody wins. But as 
a practical matter, we take a beating. 
Who is the better prospect for a stove 
or refrigerator or radio, an American 
plywood worker making $2.00 per 
hour, or the Japanese worker making 
about 19<? per hour? Who can buy 
more farm products, the American 
who takes home $70 per week, or 
the Jap whose wages barely provide 
a bowl of rice a day for his family? 

"I think the answer is rather ob- 
vious. No one has yet been able to 
convince me that throwing one Ameri- 
can worker out of a job to help an 
under-paid and under-nourished for- 
eign worker is good economics for us. 
Yet that is exactly what happens when 
Japanese plywood or Italian office 
machines are allowed to come into 
our market almost duty-free." 

The years since 1954 bear out the 
truth of Brother Blaier's statement at 
that time. An excerpt from the 
minutes of the January 16 meeting of 
the executive council of the Western 
Council of Lumber and Sawmill 
Workers makes interesting reading in 
the light of Brother Blaier's 1954 
warnings. The excerpt reads as fol- 
lows: 

"Dan Johnston, Economic Advisor 



to the Western Council, also reported 
on a study made on foreign imports 
of wood products, which showed a 
tremendous increase in recent years. 
He stated that reports show that in 
1959, 1,318,000,000 feet of hardwood 
plywood was imported to the United 
States, which is approximately double 
the amount of imports of 1956-1957. 
For the second quarter only of 1 960, 
imports were 277,483,000. In four 
years, other imports have increased 
as follows: 

"Furniture imports from Japan 
only, although there were also im- 
ports from other countries, went up 
from 5,000,000 square feet to 31,000,- 
000 square feet. Wall paneling up 
from 13,000,000 to 180,000,000 
square feet. Fixtures and cabinets up 
from 4,000,000 to 44,000.000. Flush 
doors up from 71,000,000 to 362,000,- 
000 and mobile homes from 4,000,000 
to 48,000,000." 

Earl Hartley, Western Council ex- 
ecutive secretary, long has been active 
in fighting for more realistic tariffs on 
Japanese products. 

Any fair-minded individual cannot 
help but admit that Vice President 



Blaier's predictions of an economic 
Pearl Harbor are about to come true 
unless something is done — and done 
quickly, we may add. 

Whole industries have fallen prey 
to foreign imports in recent years. 
Once there were half a dozen sewing 
machine manufacturers in the United 
States. Now there is one. Once the 
United States dominated the camera 
and radio market of the world. A 
look in the shop windows today shows 
at a glance how great has been the 
foreign invasion. Cameras and radios 
from Japan and West Germany in a 
hundred makes and sizes bid for the 
buyer's dollar. And virtually all lenses 
come from abroad now. 

Hong Kong, with a wage scale 15^ 
and 20tf an hour has become one of 
the greatest producers of men's shirts 
and women's blouses in the world. 
Italy is emerging as the shoe manu- 
facturing center of the world. Re- 
cently Remington announced that it 
was transferring the manufacture of 
all its typewriters to Europe. How- 
ever, the company reconsidered when 
protests mounted. 

What makes the situation parti- 



The import situation is getting so serious that one enterprising 
American firm is selling the desk sign shown in photograph below. 




MARCH, 1961 



cularly difficult is that American capi- 
tal owns a great many of the foreign 
firms. This means that American 
corporations have little interest in 
stemming the tide of foreign imports, 
especially since the tax structure is 
geared to give investments abroad a 
break. 

This, then, is the unhappy situation 
as it exists today. American invest- 
ment dollars are flowing abroad at an 
ever-increasing pace. Every $18,000 
or $20,000 invested abroad exports 
one American job. 

What can be done about the situa- 
tion? Lasting relief must come from 
government action, of course. 

Recently Senator Gore of Tennessee 
introduced a bill that would put profits 
made abroad and those made at home 
on an equal footing. This, at least, is 
a start. His bill would not prohibit 
American firms from investing abroad, 
but it would eliminate some of the 
existing tax inducements now enjoyed 
by foreign investments. 

Another encouraging factor is that 
American labor is gradually awaken- 
ing to the menace posed by low-wage 
foreign imports. More mail comes to 
THE CARPENTER on the subject of 
curbing foreign imports than on any 
other one thing. A really awakened 
labor movement can do a great deal 
to stem the flow of low-range foreign 
imports. After all, the imports have 
to be sold after they reach this 
country. If every union family would 
refuse to buy anything but American- 
made products for six months, the 
foreign invasion would be slowed to a 
trickle. 

In the present situation the union 
label takes on special importance. The 
union label is a guarantee that the 
goods bearing it are not only made in 
America but also made under union 
standards of wages and working con- 
ditions. 

The Springfield and Vicinity (Mas- 
sachusetts) District Council has a 
campaign under way to emphasize the 
importance of buying American. The 
council has had bumper cards printed 
and distributed bearing the message 
that buying American can save jobs. 

Eventually the government may get 
around to doing something about the 
situation. In the meantime, a deter- 
mined campaign by American labor 
can go a long way toward correcting 
matters with a determination to buy 
only goods bearing the union label. 



COOK FORTH5 
CMtOH 
CA850 



r^, 




GE Chairman Resigns 
As BAC Chairman 

On the heels of bitter criticism of 
the ethics of General Electric Co. re- 
sulting from $437,500 in fines and 
the jailing of three top executives of 
the firm for price-fixing and bid- 
rigging, GE Chairman Ralph Cordi- 
ner has resigned as chairman of the 
Business Advisory Council of the De- 
partment of Commerce. 

Cordiner. who gave as his reason 
the new duties he must assume with 
the retirement of GE President Rob- 
ert Paxton due to ill health, will con- 
tinue to be a member of the Council, 
however. 

A total of 29 major electrical 
appliance manufacturing firms and 
executives received fines of approxi- 
mately $2 million. Four other execu- 
tives received prison terms while a 
number received suspended sentences. 
Neither Cordiner nor Paxton were de- 
fendants in the suits, but their leader- 
ship of the corporation brought heavy 
criticism on them personally. 

Judge J. Cullen Ganey of Philadel- 
phia, in handing down the sentences, 
said "the real blame is to be laid at 
the doorstep of corporate defendants 
and those who guide and direct their 
policy." 

Secretary of Commerce Luther 
Hodges said that he could not re- 
move Cordiner from the chairmanship 
of the BAC since the members of the 
Council elect their own chairman. 



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THE CARPENTER 




wood 
schools 



are 





good 
schools . . . 



The Tacoma Story 




(Continued from last issue) 



Tacoma, Wash., proved that communities can get 
more schools for less money by building of wood. 
They get safer schools too. Wood schools are 
durable, flexible, and require a minimum of 
maintenance. They are easier to heat. 

Jetting the story of wood schools across to 
architects, school officials and the general public 
is a job all of us can work at. 
THE TACOMA STORY summarizes all the ad- 
vantages of wood construction. 




wood schools cost less 

Wood stretches the school building 
dollar, and at the same time gives 
better value to your community. 
Wood eases the pressure on school 
building budgets. Savings of 20 to 
40 percent on construction costs in 
wood as compared to concrete and 
steel are reported from every section 
of America. 

Billions of dollars can be saved over 
the next ten years if our school dis- 
tricts will specify lumber, plywood and 
other products that Carpenters work 
with. These materials are always 
readily available locally, and so are 
the skilled craftsmen who work in 
these materials. 

"On identical schools I have saved 
as much as $4 a square foot." declares 
a leading Pacific Northwest architect, 
who has become an enthusiast for 
wood. Any architect who is on the 
ball wants to save dollars for his 
client. He is going to want to know 
what is being done elsewhere with 
wood to save money. 

Tacoma, Wash., saved $135,000 by 
constructing a junior high school 
basically of wood, and this "extra" 
money fully equipped the plant. In 
the same city another school not de- 



signed in wood cost $14 a square 
foot, compared to $11.20 for the 
wood school. 

On their latest series of new schools 
and additions, Tacoma found a start- 
ling difference in costs. On its steel 
and concrete structures, costs averaged 
$13.73, and its wood buildings cost 
$11.69 per square foot. The non- 
wood structures ran $208,000 above 
budget, and the wood schools saved 
$446,000 under budget. 

Many other districts have done 
even better on costs in recent years, 
and have met quality standards for 
education plants while doing it. In the 
State of Oregon, Ashland recently 
built a junior high school for $9.75 a 
square foot. North Bend and Spring- 
field built junior highs in wood for 
$10.10 a foot; Newberg a grade school 
for $10.25, and Ridge wood a grade 
school for $9.70. 

"The difference in cost favoring 
wood over other materials is unbe- 
lievable. Wood is all we'll use now 
in our school district." That's the word 
of the superintendent at University 
Park, a suburb of Tacoma, Wash. 

The thousands of dollars your dis- 
trict can save by building schools of 
wood are mighty important to your 



taxpayers. And there's frosting for 
this savings cake, too. For every $3 
saved on the building cost, one more 
dollar is saved in interest over a 20- 
year period. 

wood schools are safe schools 

Don't let them tell you wood 
schools are not safe. Today's modern 
school built of wood is actually safer 
than your own home. 

The well-planned, one-story wood 
school offers the best combination of 
life safety factors — against fire, winds, 
earthquakes, against structural col- 
lapse, noxious fumes, and against 
panic and entrapment. 

Safety in schools is a matter of 
exits, and not building materials. Fire 
protection authorities say this is true. 
When exits are numerous and properly 
placed, a school can be completely 
evacuated in less than one minute. 

Stored materials and furnishings 
usually have more to do with the start 
of a fire than does the structure itself. 
If lives are lost, it's because exits are 
blocked on upper floors. 

The single-story school with many 
exits allows orderly retreat by all oc- 
cupants well ahead of actual danger. 

The superiority of wood beams 



MARCH, 1961 



under extreme fire conditions has been 
proved thousands of times. Wood 
beams will char but usually stand fast, 
while steel beams will buckle at tem- 
peratures above 1,200 degrees, letting 
down upper floors and roof. 

A wood frame school can provide 
better fire safety than schools in which 
fire detection, protection and control 
measures have been relaxed because 
of so-called incombustible construc- 
tion. 

Wood structures are highly resistant 
to the forces of severe winds and 
earthquakes. The elasticity of wood 
permits it to bend under the blow and 
spring back without shattering. 

Certain areas which have set up 
strict rules for construction because 
of earthquake danger recognize that 
proper design and construction in 
wood is entirely satisfactory. And it's 
much less costly than proper construc- 
tion in other materials. 

wood schools are easy to maintain 

Use wood properly, and it is no 
harder to keep in good condition than 



other building materials. This is the 
word of experienced school men. 

"Maintenance costs are just about 
even up," says Architect Robert B. 
Price, who has designed many schools 
in both wood and concrete-steel in 
western Washington. 

Wood does not rust, corrode, snap, 
bulge, clink, clatter, crumble, shatter, 
melt, shock, vibrate, dust off, rub off, 
puncture, pit, tear or curl. 

Wood is highly resistant to wear 
and tear, but when damage occurs, 
repairs can easily be made by local 
carpenters. 

Wood takes and holds paint better 
than other materials, and the original 
fresh, clean look can be restored at 
any time, inside and out. Wide roof 
overhangs and use of stains and 
rough-finished wood on exteriors will 
reduce maintenance work. 

In school buildings as in homes, 
the areas and surfaces subject to wear 
and direct use are those needing main- 
tenance. Hardware, plumbing fixtures, 
roofs and floors are most often in 
need of care. Savings possible on 



wood frame construction enable a 
school district to purchase heavy-duty 
materials for these uses, thus assuring 
lower maintenance costs for later 
years. 

"The only areas in a new school 
where we depart from wood construc- 
tion," declares the building superin- 
tendent of Tacoma public schools, 
James Hopkins, "are around the toilets 
where moisture might accumulate, 
and around the furnace rooms where 
we use concrete or concrete block to 
enclose the furnace area." 

wood schools are durable 

Don't let them build costly monu- 
ments of stone and steel in the name 
of durability. Wood schools built at 
less cost will outlive their usefulness. 

Schools become obsolete long be- 
fore they wear out. Many three and 
four story schools are being torn 
down these days, not because they are 
worn out but because poor design 
makes them inefficient or unsafe. 

A wood school is good for 75 years 
or more, if given normal custodial 




Pre-assembled roof sections are lifted easily into place. 
Ceiling material is already applied, reducing drudgery. 



Wood posts and beams supporting frame roof and plywood 
ceiling provide walkway for economy-priced school in Tacoma. 



This round school, supported on wood posts and beams, 

proved to be both low-cost and safe. One of Tacoma's new 

elementary schools, it contains eight classrooms, each with 

outside exit and door to large all-purpose room at center. 



Wide overhangs reduce midday glare, save on maintenance. 
This wood school, including dome auditorium, is 
typical of Tacoma's new money-saving projects 
that have used Carpenter skills and wood. 




THE CARPENTER 



care, says one architect. But school 
design will not stand still that long — 
at least it has not stood still in the 
past half-century. Just what makes up 
the ideal school plant will continue 
changing, just as it has in recent 
decades. 

Taxpayers in many areas are re- 
belling against the building of costly 
monuments to the centuries. Wood is 
more than adequate to serve the nor- 
mal life expectancy of a school. 

Furthermore, if changes are needed 
over the years to overcome some new- 
found obsolescence or add space, the 
wood school is easier to remodel and 
adapt, or even to change over to an 
entirely different use if desired. 

Ideal locations change with the 
years, too. Many schools built 20 to 
60 years ago stand today in neighbor- 
hoods which have become mostly 
industrial and commercial, and which 
no longer are near where today's 
children live. 

People working in those changed 
areas are living in newer residential 
districts, and they build new schools 
closer to their new homes. This proc- 
ess of changing needs goes on con- 
tinuously. One administrator has even 



suggested a 30-year expendable 
school. 

Wood homes a century old are far 
from rare. There is every reason to 
believe wood has ample durability for 
the basic construction of schools. 

wood sc/ioo/s are easier to change 

Your schools will keep up with the 
times better, if they're built of wood. 
Today's schools must be adaptable to 
change in order to give our children 
the best possible education. 

Wood construction is easiest to ex- 
pand and easiest to alter as changes 
occur in the educational program, 
calling for more space or for re- 
arranging existing space. Oftentimes, 
the excessive cost of altering a 
masonry structure knocks out any 
plans for changing it. 

Most frequent is the need for ex- 
panding a school on its present site 
to serve the ever-growing numbers of 
children seeking an education. In 
many fast-expanding communities, the 
practice of building "growth" schools 
is spreading. These are planned so a 
new addition can be built any year 
that it is needed. 



Additions and changes are readily 
made to the modern wood school. An 
example is the single-story "cluster" 
type built on a campus plan, such as 
one of Tacoma's new plants. Each 
structure is 66 feet square, with roof 
supported by eight laminated wood 
beams converging in a peak. 

Three structures are divided into 
four rooms each, separated by divider 
walls either open or glassed in at the 
top. The fourth structure is a shell 
with clear interior, at present used for 
play. It can easily be converted to 
classrooms with partitions, and the 
present office space in one building 
can be made into a classroom simply 
by removing the present dividers. 

New similar buildings can be added 
to the little campus, connected as are 
the others with covered walkways. The 
first four buildings cost $10.97 a 
square foot. 

wood schools cost less to heat 

Did you know that wood stands 
above all other structural materials for 
its insulating qualities? This means 
savings on heating bills in winter, and 
also on air conditioning in warm 
weather. 




Roof framing seen from topside is 
product of good portion of 36,000 
Carpenter hours going into Mt. Tahoma 
High School, Tacoma. 

Cluster-type building is one of four, 

each sized for four classrooms, in 

this school, which meant thousands of 

hours for Tacoma Carpenters. 

Below left: 

Proper use of wood provides modern, 
safe facilities such as this manual 
arts shop. Wood structures can be 
remodeled easily for new uses. 

Below right: 

Glass wall framed with wood mullions 

and rails offers view of courtyard 

at Tacoma junior high school. Wood 

saved 14% under building budget. 





MARCH, 1961 



One inch thickness of wood equals 
six inches of brick or 15 inches of 
concrete or sandstone in insulation 
value. And the dead air space which 
frame construction provides adds even 
more to wood's superiority as an in- 
sulator. 

A typical brick wall loses heat AV2 
times as fast as an insulated wood 
wall, and one-fourth faster than a 
wood wall without insulation. 

Wood's superiority is even greater 
when compared to metals. Steel 
transmits heat about 400 times as fast 
as wood, and aluminum about 1,800 
times as fast. 

insurance on wood schoo/s nof a 
major cost 

Don't swallow the argument that 
insurance on wood schools is so high 
it is poor business to build in wood. 
Actually, the savings on wood con- 
struction and the savings in interest 
on money that does not have to be 
borrowed more than make up any 
difference on insurance. 

For every three dollars saved on the 
cost of building a school, an additional 
dollar is saved on interest charges 



where the debt is paid off over a 20- 
year period. 

Insurance is not a major expense 
in the operation of schools, compared 
to most other expenses. Here's an ex- 
ample of how insurance stacks up in 
the school budget picture: 

The all-wood Hunt Junior High 
School was built in Tacoma, Wash., 
a couple of years ago. The use of 
wood saved the taxpayers $122,000 
under the district's allocation. The 
actual cost was $995,000. The saving 
on bond interest by building of eco- 
nomical wood materials is going to 
be a large item, close to $25,000 in a 
ten-year period. 

Fire insurance on this all-wood 
school, covering 90 percent of ap- 
praised valuation, costs about $1,300 
a year. The rate for concrete and steel 
would be several hundreds of dollars 
less, but the savings on the original 
building cost would pay the difference 
on the insurance for 150 years. 

James Hopkins, assistant superin- 
tendent of Tacoma schools, sums it 
up: "We find that the savings in 
initial investment in the all-wood 
frame school more than offset any 
increase in insurance or maintenance." 



WRITE FOR THESE AIDS 

Facts will help you sell wood 
schools. These factual booklets 
will be sent to you, as soon as 
you write for them: 

"More for Your Money with 
the Modern Wood School" 
"School Buildings Your Tax 

Dollars Can Afford" 
"Comparative Costs of Walls, 

Partitions and Roofs for 

School Buildings" 

The above are available, 
single copies free, from 

National Lumber Manufacturers 

Association 
1319 Eighteenth St. N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 

"Today's Better Schools Are 
Built of Wood" 

Write to 

West Coast Lumbermen's 

Association 
1410 S. W. Morrison St. 
Portland 5, Oregon 



By ROGER W. CRUSAN 

Business Representative 
Carpenters' Union No. 470 
Tacoma, Washington 



We have lived with this Tacoma story. We know 
what it means to Carpenters when our schools are 
built of wood. Here in Tacoma, we know that wood 
construction has brought to our craftsmen many 
thousands of dollars in wages. 

Here's one example. When we built our newest 
junior high school, we built it of wood. This is a 
medium-size school, and the general contract was for 
$570,000. For our Carpenters it meant 17,631 hours 
of work, and more than $58,000 in wages. 

An even better one is our new high school now 
under construction. General contract is for $1,460,- 
000. Our local members are working 36,000 hours 
on this wood school, and earning more than 
$121,000 in wages. 

This kind of business is worth fighting for. If we 
want to win jobs and wages, we've got to speak out 
as Carpenters. Too many times we've let our com- 
petition do all the talking and selling. 

When we demand that school officials hear the 
story of wood construction, we are speaking as good 
citizens, too. We are on the side of good schools for 
our children, soundly built and soundly financed. 

You can win more economical schools for your 
community, and more days of work for yourselves. 




Well-designed wood schools are safe, modern, long- 
lasting and pleasing to the eye. 

We're getting this message across here in the 
Pacific Northwest. You can do the same to help 
yourselves wherever you live in America. 

Schools are big business to the construction in- 
dustry. 

Nearly 63,000 new classrooms were built in 
America in the past year. And 60,000 to 70,000 
additional new rooms will be needed every year for 
some years to come. 

Your own community, in all probability, is caught 
up in the nationwide growth in numbers of children 
at or approaching school age. 

About 1,400,000 new pupils will be added in each 
of the next two years, and the rapid increase of 
school-age population will go right on beyond that. 
More than 50,000,000 children will be in elementary 
and high schools within five years. 

This growth calls for a huge amount of school con- 
struction. 

Is wood going to get the share it deserves of this 
building program? How about your own community? 
Are your school districts using readily available wood 
products and local labor to save tax dollars? 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



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MARCH, 1961 



1 I 



IBBITOMAli 




FACTS SHOULD SPEAK FOR 
THEMSELVES 

As the January issue was going to press, charges 
and counter-charges regarding the disastrous fire on 
the USS Constellation were flying back and forth 
between Naval officials and New York fire-fighting 
authorities. Everybody was looking for something 
or someone to pin the blame on. 

In an editorial in the January issue, we cau- 
tioned all responsible parties to remain calm 
until such time as true facts could be determined. 
Investigations carried on since that time show 
that the advice was well grounded. 

Almost before the fire was out, New York 
Fire Commissioner Cavanagh was blaming 
the existence of wood scaffolding on the job 
for the tragedy. Hearings held since that 
time prove that wood planking, rather than 
being a chief cause of the disaster, was 
actually an important factor in saving the 
lives of workmen. 
Dan Stea, shop groupmaster at the shipyard, testi- 
fied that wood planking saved many lives. "/ owe my 
life and the lives of a hundred other men to the wood 
scaffolding planks hung from the galley decks," he 
said. 

Stea led these men from the right side of the ship 
to the left looking for an escape opening to the flight 
deck. 

He testified that the wood scaffolding acted 
as a barrier and insulator between the steel deck 
and the raging fire below. He also testified that 
many of the wood ladders, although burned and 
charred, were used during and after the fire. 
On the other hand, aluminum ladders melted or 
collapsed in the fire. 
Rear Admiral Pyne, commander of the New York 
shipyard, also defended the use of wood planking. 

Asked why wood planking was used, his reply was: 
"The use of wood is not only based on its economy 
but also because of its rigidity. It is not slippery and 
does not conduct electricity." 

Captain Brown, production officer at the ship- 
yard, also testified: "Wood is a common ship- 
building material. It is impossible to eliminate 
it. Wood is the best and safest material for ship- 
building." 
Other evidence collected to date shows that steel 
and aluminum members used in the scaffolds buckled 



or melted, while the wood planking often charred 
but still retained a major portion of its structural 
strength. 

Evidence also discloses that the fire was spread by 
the use of water jets when foam or water fog should 
have been used. 

Gases created by burning plastic cable insulation 
and varnish added greatly to the stubbornness of the 
fire. 

Adding everything together, the existence of 
wood planking contributed little to the spread 
of the fire. 

On the other hand, many lives that were saved 
owe their survival to the presence of wood planking. 
Investigations are still going on. When the final re- 
port is written, wood will not turn out to be a major 
culprit. 

Yet those who made snap judgments to cover their 
own shortcomings did the wood industry irreparable 
harm by placing all the blame on wood when a dozen 
other factors, each more damaging than the existence 
of wood, contributed to the tragic holocaust. 

After all, a number of our members perished in 
the fire. We are as interested as anyone else in arriv- 
ing at the true facts so that similar tragedies can be 
averted in the future. But we resent those who grab 
for the nearest thing to use as a scapegoat — in this 
case, wood. 




TRUTH CROPS UP IN THE 
STRANGEST PLACES 

The NEW YORKER is not a magazine you 
normally look to for penetrating comments on eco- 
nomic or political affairs. Its field is sophistication 
and entertainment. However, in its February 1 1 issue 
the magazine neatly applied the needle to New York 
newspapers for their persistent failure to report strike 
news fairly and objectively. Because newspapers 
everywhere throughout the United States and Canada 
are as biased and as opinionated in the handling of 
labor news as the New York newspapers are, the 
NEW YORKER editorial is herewith reprinted in full: 
Notes and Comment 

There was a time, during the prime of the 
late Senator Joseph McCarthy, when a large 
section of the press held that to say a man had 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



a right to a fair hearing was equivalent to ap- 
proving of whatever he was accused of — com- 
munism or subversion or consorting with Har- 
vard professors. We hold no brief for "feather- 
bedding," a catchword with an aura of having 
been invented by a company public-relations 
man, or for "labor-sweating," a practice ascribed 
to management by the public-relations men for 
unions. But we cannot agree with the news- 
papers here (all of them) that in the strike of 
railway-towboat workers that spread to dry land 
last month "featherbedding was the issue," any 
more than we would agree that murder — i.e., its 
desirability — was "the issue" in a murder trial. 
The issue, as the newspapers almost surreptiti- 
ously stated in the news columns, was the tow- 
boat unions' refusal to let management decide, on 
its own hook, what constituted featherbedding — 
whether or not it would be a good idea to cut 
the present standard crew of five. To yield would 
have been like agreeing to let management decide 
which it would prefer — a twelve-hour day or an 
eight-hour day, for the same money. We are 
not experts on towboat management, but when 
we looked out through our window and the 
falling snow toward the swatch of North River 
we can sometimes see between the Paramount 
Building and the Hotel Dixie — we couldn't see 
that far then, of course — we remembered the 
last time we had been out there in like conditions, 
some years ago, and it didn't make us think of 
a bed, even a foam-rubber one. We are begin- 
ning to worry, for the newspapers' sake, about 
their custom of ruling, in every strike, that labor 
is wrongheaded, as if they were a panel of 
arbitrators appointed by a Higher Power. A 
fortune cookie is not worth buying when the 
strip of paper inside always carries the same 
legend. This time, the newspapers were all out- 
raged because "664 maritime workers" could 
tie up the town by their stubbornness in a dis- 
pute with eleven railroads and terminal com- 
panies. The corollary, that eleven railroad pres- 
idents were being equally stubborn, with as good 
(or bad) reason, was left for the reader to figure 
out for himself, and in most cases, we imagine, 
he did. 

In the task, both delicate and rugged, of han- 
dling oil and freight barges in a river as wide 
as a lake and as thronged as Fifth Avenue, 
plagued by submerged floating matter, and often 
nearly blanked out by fog or snow, the number 
of men aboard a tug is of more than cheese- 
paring interest. It may mean the difference be- 
tween a routine day on the river and catastrophe. 
Automation is seldom what it is cracked up to 
be, afloat or ashore. In the building where we 
work, machinery has replaced the fallible human 
beings who once operated the controls of the 
elevators, and is eighty-eight times as fallible. 
Bus service has been miserable since they took 
the conductors off. We are all for co-pilots on 



airplanes, waiter captains as well as waiters (and 
lots of busboys), grocers' delivery boys (down 
with gocarts and supermarkets), barbershop 
shaves, and bookmakers instead of pari-mutuel 
machines. In brief, plenty of manpower. Let 
the railroads beware of eliminating anybody at 
all; they run badly enough already. 

Our only comment: too bad the NEW YORKER 
does not devote more attention to labor matters. 




RECESSION WITH A DIFFERENCE 

To the six million unemployed there is very little 
difference between the present recession and the great 
depression of the 1930's. For them the "no help 
wanted" signs of 1961 are as ominous and as dis- 
couraging as similar signs were to their fathers 30 
years ago. 

However, there is one major difference be- 
tween the economic stagnation of today and that 
existing a quarter of a century ago. In the de- 
pression, everyone suffered, — workers, small 
businessmen and corporations. Today the work- 
ers certainly are suffering. So are hundreds of 
thousands of small businesses. But the big cor- 
porations are rolling along right merrily. The 
steel industry pays healthy profits on less than 
50 per cent of productive capacity. New cars 
are running out of dealers but GM and Ford 
keep making substantial profits anyway. 

Two factors contribute to this situation. First, labor 
saving machinery is throwing men out of work while 
it contributes to bigger profits. Second, many Amer- 
ican corporations have branch factories overseas, and 
these contribute to profits even while they throw 
Americans out of work. 

The importance of the threat of foreign imports 
is set forth in detail in a special article in this issue 
"Economic Pearl Harbor" on page 4. We invite our 
members also to note the back cover which is a 
message in art form against the foreign imports — the 
illustrations points up the importance of the union 
label in this anti-import fight. 

All this leads to one logical conclusion: The 
measures to get the economic machinery rolling 
must be aimed at the working man and the small 
businessman. That is why labor's suggestions 
to extend unemployment insurance, give workers 
a temporary break in taxes, curb excessive im- 
ports, etc. are so significant. Recovery can be 
achieved only by tipping the purchasing power 
of the masses. And such purchasing power can 
come only from improving the lot of all workers. 



MARCH, 1961 



13 



What Wonders God Hath Wrought 




SOME time in 1964, scientists ..will 
fiddle with the tuning dials of the 
"Big Dish" (now under construction 
at Sugar Grove, West Virginia) and 
not a pin will be able to drop on Mars 
or Venus without our knowing it. 

The Big Dish is the Navy's huge 
new radio telescope on which hun- 
dreds of building tradesmen have 
been working for several years; and 
several more years' work will be 
needed to complete the project. 

Naturally, the project is a hush- 
hush proposition. But a few of the 
general specifications are already 
known to the public. 

The Dish will be somewhere in the 
neighborhood of 600 feet in diameter. 
The largest known similar installation 



existing at the present time is located 
at Jodrell Bank, England. It measures 
around 250 feet in diameter. Russia 
is said to be working on a 350-foot 
model. 

When in operation, the Big Dish 
will be able to collect and focus elec- 
tromagnetic signals from suns and 
galaxies 38 billion light years away — 
if the universe extends that far. 

To appreciate what a light year 
really means, it is only necessary to 
understand that light travels at the 
rate of 186,000 miles per second. 
Multiply the number of seconds in a 
year by 186,000 and you have one 
light year. Even by our extremely 
shaky arithmetic it adds up to 28,536,- 
000 x 186,000 miles. Multiply the 



product of this equation by 38 billion, 
and you find out how far the Big 
Dish will reach. 

The Dish will reach 19 times 
farther into space than the largest 
optical telescope. It is so sensitive it 
will be able to pick up signals emitted 
by heat-agitated atoms or thermonuc- 
lear reactions on the outer edges of 
space. The direction and wave 
lengths of these signals will give man 
new clues to the makeup of our uni- 
verse. 

An engineering project of tremend- 
ous magnitude, erection of the Big 
Dish has posed many challenges to 
engineers and building craftsmen 
alike. A story in the September, 1960, 
issue told how draft horses had to 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




These girders, 17 feet deep by 14 feet wide, give 
some indication of the size of the installation. 




Even old Dobbin had to be brought into the act 
because of the rough and remote terrain. 



drag materials on stone boats to some 
of the remoter sections of the build- 
ing site. Even old Dobbin has played 
a part in the project. 

The Dish, when completed, will 
include some 20,000 tons of steel 
and 10,000 cubic yards of concrete. 
Its face will be aluminum mesh to cut 
wind resistance and heat expansion. 

It will be mounted on huge rockers 
that will permit it to tilt to any 
angle. The towers supporting the 
Dish will be nearly 700 feet high. 
Mounted on huge rollers, the whole 
mechanism will be able to turn the 
full 360 degrees. This will enable 
scientists to accurately focus on in- 
credibly minute sectors of our uni- 
verse. 

The Navy chose Sugar Grove, West 
Virginia, for the site of the project 
primarily because of its seclusion. 



Mountains shield the area from radio 
interference generated by the nearest 
city, Harrisonburg, Virginia, 23 miles 
away, and by trucks and buses rolling 
through the Shenandoah Valley. No 
airline route passes overhead, and no 
radio or television station operates 
nearby. 

Legend has it that the first words 
Samuel F. B. Morse uttered over his 
newly invented telegraph were these: 
"What wonders God hath wrought." 

If Mr. Morse uttered them they 
were entirely appropriate, for the tele- 
phone has proved to be a great boon 
to the human race. If Mr. Morse did 
not say them, then the scientist who 
first flips the switch on the Big Dish 
ought to use them, because a new 
wonder capable of transporting human 
ears and eyes beyond the utmost 
bounds of human thought has come 
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MARCH, 1961 



15 




Annual Memorandum 



CLC Urges "Full Employment Act" Passage; 
Unionists Visit Members Of Parliament 



The Canadian Labour Congress, 
backed up by 600 unionists from 
across Canada, presented its annual 
brief to the government early in Feb- 
ruary before a full array of cabinet 
ministers. 

Nineteen ministers, including Prime 
Minister Diefenbaker, were on hand to 
hear CLC president Claude Jodoin 
read the 35-page memorandum. Last 
year only six ministers turned out for 
the occasion. 

The CLC concentrated most of its 
fire on the unemployment crisis. Re- 
peating its demand for massive spend- 
ing in the public sector — with a budget 
deficit if necessary — the Congress also 
urged that the government: 

• introduce in the Commons a Full 
Employment Act which would spell 
out the government's responsibility for 
full employment; which would require 
the government to take steps to meet 
its obligations and would provide for 
constant study of the economy; 

• a reorganization of government 
departments to strengthen the depart- 
ment of labor and to centralize the 



attack on unemployment under one 
administration. 

When the reading of the brief was 
completed, the 600 unionists and 
Mr. Jodoin moved to the nearby 
Chateau Laurier Hotel in Ottawa 
where they received instructions for a 
lobby on members of parliament. Fifty 
teams then fanned out on Parliament 
Hill, buttonholing MPs to get their 
views on the jobless crisis. Each MP 
was asked if he would support the 
CLC program in the House of Com- 
mons. The results of the survey will 
be published later. 

Labour Minister Starr replied to the 
brief on behalf of the government. He 
told a jammed committee room that 
the solution to unemployment was 
everyone's responsibility. Labor and 
management had to do their share, he 
declared, if the problem was to be 
met. 

Mr. Jodoin in his closing statement 
noted that there was a much better 
turnout of cabinet ministers this year 
than in 1960. "We are pleased to see 
that all the members of Local No. 1 



of the cabinet members' union are in 
attendance," he quipped. The presi- 
dent of the local didn't crack a smile. 

Mr. Diefenbaker thanked the union 
members for coming and said that as 
long as the suggestion presented by 
labor could be worked into the free 
enterprise system, they would always 
be welcome. Mr. Jodoin emphasized 
that he and his colleagues were ap- 
pearing as representatives of organized 
labor, speaking on behalf of all trade 
unionists in Canada. 

The brief criticized the govern- 
ment's action in halting the non-op 
strike by legislation. "It deprived the 
railway workers of this country of 
the right to strike, a right to which 
they were otherwise legally entitled 
under long-existing legislation." It put 
the workers at a disadvantage, de- 
clared Mr. Jodoin, and revealed the 
inadequacies of the present concilia- 
tion procedure. 

Referring to its requests on social 
security as "hardy perennials" ("This 
is no fault of ours"), the Congress 
urged immediate action on health 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



insurance, increased old age pensions, 
portable pensions, and a comprehen- 
sive social security program. 

Mr. Jodoin expressed the CLC's dis- 
pleasure at the government's tossing 
together U. S. control of business and 
so-called U. S. control of labor in a 
proposed investigation. There are im- 
portant distinctions, said the CLC 
president. The constitutions of unions 
are open to scrutiny to anyone who 
cares to examine them. Union conven- 
tions are open. Union books and 
financial statements are published in 
jetail and are available to the public 
is well as their own members. 

"The century-long record of trade 
anion movement in Canada does not 
warrant any legislative interference." 

On international affairs, the Con- 
gress declared flatly that "neutrality 
s not a solution." Canada should 
vork to strengthen the United Nations 
md to achieve agreement on disarma- 
nent and the necessary controls and 
nspection. But "the Congress does 
lot believe Canada can make a con- 
ribution in this direction by unilateral 
lisarmament or by pursuing a policy 
>f armed or disarmed neutrality." No 
lation is neutral in respect to her own 
lational interests, the brief pointed 
rat. 

"Unless and until there is disarma- 
nent, Canada must maintain, consist- 
nt with her resources, an effective 
nilitary establishment which can be 
lseful to herself, to her allies and the 
Jnited Nations." 

Spokesmen for Canadian industry 
lave long been pressing for legisla- 
ion making unions legal entities so 
hat they can be sued for damages in 
he courts for breach of a collective 
greement. In most Canadian prov- 
nces, unions are protected against 
his form of harassment. 

Now an Ontario Supreme Court 
Thief Justice's ruling opens another 
venue for penalizing a union — and 
ompanies may soon be lining up to 
ake advantage of it. 

Chief Justice J. C. McRuer quashed 
n appeal by the Oil, Chemical and 
Uomic Workers International Union 
nd ruled that an arbitration board 
las the power to levy damages against 

union for violation of a collective 
greement even if that contract con- 
ains no such specific authority. 

The case goes back two years to a 
ralkout by members of the union's 
ocal at Polymer Corporation Ltd., a 
lig Crown-owned synthetic rubber 
ilant in Sarnia, Ont. 

An arbitration board headed by 
'rofessor Bora Laskin of the Univer- 
ity of Toronto held the oil union lo- 



cal's leadership responsible for what 
was deemed an illegal strike. Chair- 
man Laskin maintained the company 
was entitled to damages from the un- 
ion for financial losses suffered during 
the walkout and he ruled the board 
was empowered to award such dam- 
ages. 

When the union appealed on the 
ground that the Laskin board had ex- 
ceeded its powers, a hearing to assess 
the actual amount of damages was 
postponed. 

The McRuer decision upholds the 
Laskin award. Unless it is upset by 
a further appeal to the Ontario Ap- 
peal Court or the Supreme Court of 
Canada, it will tend to add immense- 
ly to the powers of a labor arbitra- 
tion board. 

In his judgment, Mr. Justice Mc- 
Ruer said that under a collective 
agreement all differences between the 
parties must be settled without stop- 
page of work. If there is a breach of 
the agreement, it is a grievance to be 
dealt with and disposed of by an 
award of the arbitrator. 



Since a trade union had a legal 
capacity to enter into a contract, it 
had imposed on it the responsibility 
flowing from a breach of that agree- 
ment, the chief justice reasoned. He 
considered it clear that a union had 
the capacity to incur liability for dam- 
ages and hence that an arbitration 
board was within its powers in pro- 
ceeding to assess and award damages. 

What Canadian unions fear is that 
the McRuer decision will make arbi- 
tration board hearings the happy 
hunting ground for those elements 
anxious to persecute unions. 

There are no rules, no recognized 
limits governing an arbitration board 
in finding a union culpable — nothing 
to stop a board from pinning respon- 
sibility on a union for the irresponsible 
acts of an individual or a small group. 

David Lewis, a leading Canadian 
labor lawyer and counsel for the oil 
union at the appeal hearing, said up- 
holding of the Laskin award might be 
an invitation to industrial chaos. 

Lewis argued that an arbitration 




rtARCH, 1961 



17 



board had no inherent powers; in the 
Polymer case, it could only determine 
if the union had actually breached the 
contract. Other channels were open to 
the employer for disciplining of em- 
ployes or prosecution of the union 
under the labor code, he suggested. 

Of course, the McRuer decision is 
a two-edged sword. The chief justice 
emphasized that an arbitration board 
had equal authority to award damages 
against a company where the employe 
had suffered loss as a result of man- 
agement violation of the contract. 

Canadian unions bidding for such 
compensation on behalf of aggrieved 
employes have often been blocked in 
the past. 

In cases of unjust layoffs, suspen- 
sions or firings, union victories have 
been clouded because leading arbitra- 
tors have submitted they had no power 
to award compensation unless there 
was specific authority in the contract. 
But the McRuer ruling gives unions 
the green light to seek such redress 
even without contract sanction. 

On balance, however, the chief 
justice's finding may contain more 
threat than benefit for the labor move- 
ment. 

With the knowledge that a wildcat 
walkout could result in a damaging 



arbitration case for a union, there may 
be temptation for unscrupulous em- 
ployers to provoke wildcats. 

Even without provocation, the lack 
of criteria in the arbitration process 
may lead to wars of attrition. The 
years of struggle to fend off court 
suits which drain a union's resources 
can be undermined by this broadening 
of an arbitration board's functions. 

Seek Commutation of 
Harsh Sentences 

Commutation of harsh, long term 
jail sentences imposed on eight union 
men has been asked by the AFL-CIO 
Executive Council in its mid-winter 
session in Bal Harbour, Fla. 

The Council called upon Governor 
Terry Sanford of North Carolina to 
commute the sentences of eight mem- 
bers of the Textile Workers Union of 
America in the Harriet-Henderson 
strike. The Council in its resolution 
called the sentences "unusally severe 
and harsh. None of these men had 
any previous marks against their rec- 
ord . . . their reputations are of the 
highest." 

The Executive Council called upon 
affiliates to adopt resolutions also call- 
ing on Governor Sanford to commute 
the sentences. 



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Why is the Rocket the choice of men 
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A Rocket comes alive in your hand. 
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18 



1 RUE I EM PER, 

THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB 

THE CARPENTER! 







IN MEMOR1AM 



. U. NO. 4, DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Kuhn, Frank 
. U. NO. 10, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Jutzi, Louis Sr. 

Kellam, Frank B. 

Kovaka, John J. 

Mikolajczyk, John 

Moore, Walter H. 

Wright, Thomas H. 
. U. NO. 12, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

French, Grover 

Partington, James 
. U. NO. 13, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Felt, Harkey 

Hartman, Paul 

Kubicki, George 

Maness, Lawrence 

Rood, John 

Smith, Edward 

Venema, Martin 

U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Schulz, Otto 

Wozniak, Edward Joseph 

U. NO. 19, DETROIT, MICH. 
Darin, Joseph 
Gowan, W. John 

U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 
McLean, Joseph 
Nelson, John A. 

U. NO. 50, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Best, George 
Fritts, H. E. 

U. NO. 51, BOSTON, MASS. 
Newman, Benjamin 
Perlman, Morris 

U. NO. 61, KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Babcock, Harold 
Beaman, Herbert 
Brockman, Milton 
Carlson, Cyrus O. 
Coulter, C. L. 
Douglass, Paul 
Ensminger, Frank E. 
Hendrix, Arthur 
Johnson, Chester 
McDowell, William S. 
Oaks, Ray 
Otto, Ellison 
Ousley, John M. 
Partlow, Laud A. 
Peake, Horace 
Scott, J. E. 
Walker, Andrew 

U. NO. 65, PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 
Behr, Henry 

U. NO. 67, ROXBURY, MASS. 
Kaye, Omar G. 
Kennedy, John J. 
MacDonald. Frank 
McGonigle, Daniel 
Troiani, Luciano 

U. NO. 72, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Beveridge, James G. 

U. NO. 74, CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 
Crawford, Floyd J. 
Crumbliss, S. W. 
Duncan, J. A. 
Greene, C. O. 
Longley, J. P. 
Milan, Richard J. 
Sanders, J. L. 
Wright, L. S. 

U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MD. 
Cox, Isaac Newton Sr. 



L. U. NO. 104, DAYTON, OHIO 

Ferree, Claude 
L. U. NO. 106, DES MOINES, IOWA 

Spaur, Lewis L. 
L. U. NO. 107, WORCESTER, MASS. 

Laquerre, Urgel 
L. U. NO. 125, UTICA, N. Y. 

Drezek, Lawrence 

Jenkins, John 

Jones, William 

King, Louis 

Montero, Germain 
L. U. NO. 155, PLAINFIELD, N. J. 

Apgar, Clarence 

Vroom, Percy 
L. U. NO. 162, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

Baker, Cliff S. 

Rock, C. E. 

Smith, Jerry H. 
L. U. NO. 179, SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Johnson, Frank A. 
L. U. NO. 200, COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Eagle, Emory 

Uhl, Thomas 
L. U. NO. 213, HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Dobbs, J. A. 

Layton, Walter 

Lentz, A. J. 

Samford, W. O. 

Thacker, R. L. 

Worthy, W. O. 
L. U. NO. 225, ATLANTA, GA. 

Abney, Frank 

Jackson, E. A. 
L. U. NO. 239, EASTON, PA. 

Getter, William H. 
L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Ceilinger, Joseph 

Ziegler, Harry 
L. U. NO. 288, HOMESTEAD, PA. 

Foust, Samuel S. 

Ruffing, Jacob 

Stiger, Jerome 

Zamberry, Julius 
L. U. NO. 298, LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

Lestingi, Michael 
L. U. NO. 303, PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

Wysocki, Paul T. 
L. U. NO. 322, NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y. 

Brown, William 

Hall, Lewis 

Lewis, Alfred ("Ollie") 

Masters, Earl 
L. U. NO. 336, LA SALLE, ILL. 

Valle, Frank R. 
L. U. NO. 343, WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Burnett. Alex S. 
L. U. NO. 350, NEW R0CHELLE, N. Y. 

Dobbs, J. Harold 
L. U. NO. 366, BRONX, N. Y. 

Herbst, Sidney 

Kustanowitz, Dave 

Sullivan, Michael 

L. U. NO. 369, NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y. 

Greenwald, Lewis 

L. U. NO. 488, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Gershon, Aaron 
Hanson, Elis K. R. 
Koch, Henry 
Simola, Viekko 
Zaruba, Joseph 

L. U. NO. 583, PORTLAND, ORE. 
Cairncross. Robert W. 
Monte, Frank P. 



L. U. NO. 594, DOVER, N. J. 

Beam, Harry Jr. 

Cole, Emery 
L. U. NO. 620, MADISON, N. J. 

Baldwin, Clarence D. 

Burnham, George 

Lynch, Edward M. 

McGuiness, Edward 

Netz, Richard 

Riley, James 
L. U. NO. 621, BANGOR, ME. 

Floyd, Fred F. 
L. U. NO. 626, WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Benson, Joseph 

Harvey, Samuel 

Norvell, Walter R. 
L. U. NO. 642, RICHMOND, CAL. 

Arnold, Glenn S. 

Ashby, Avel D. 

Bledsoe, Marion 

Chandler, O. R. 

Elliott, Thomas C. 

Gammell, Henry 

Lachner, B. E. 

Marshall, W. I. 

Nunes, Joseph T. 

Schilling, Don F. 
L. U. NO. 715, ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Babik, Paul 

Bottleman, Max 

Ferdinand, Max 

Genova, Frank 

Gordon, Joseph 
L U. NO. 787, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Knudsen, Markus 

Nil sen, Abraham 
L. U. NO. 821, NEWARK, N. J. 

Pugliese, James 

Weithop, Henry 
L. U. NO. 839, DES PLAINES, ILL. 

Douglas, John 

Kilroy, James N. 
L. U. NO. 841, CARBONDALE, ILL. 

Parks, Billie Joe 
L. U. NO. 937, DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Cooper, Edwin, I. 

L. U. NO. 998, BERKLEY, MICH. 

Morey, Max 
L. U. NO. 1006, NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

Eckerdt, August 
L. U. NO. 1098, BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Foster, Clyde 

Lee, Henry F. 

Leggett, E. L. 

Mayeux, S. J. 

Williams, Albert 

L. U. NO. 1124, NEWTON, N. J. 
Mesco, Michael 

L. U. NO. 1138, TOLEDO, OHIO 

Heindel, John 
Weber, James E. 

L. U. NO. 1371, GADSDEN, ALA. 
DeVine, Ira L. 

L. U. NO. 1382, ROCHESTER, MINN. 
Muskat. Joe L. 

L. U. NO. 1397, R0SLYN, N. Y. 
Johnson, Andrew B. 
McGowan, Hugh 

L. U. NO. 1405, HALIFAX, N. S. 
Scott, Kenneth Rockwell 
Thomas. Ernest William 

L. U. NO. 1407, WILMINGTON, CAL. 
Barnes, George E. 



Elenich, John 

Nason, Hugh C. 
L. U. NO. 1423, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Burger, George T. 

Furlong, J. H. 
L. U. NO. 1456, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Best, Clyde 

Holmquist, Evert 

McMorrow, John 

Nelson, Clifford 

Olson, Edward 
L. U. NO. 1478, RED0ND0 BEACH, CAL. 

Moore, William Roger 
L. U. NO. 1480, BOULDER, COLO. 

Kinney, Jesse M. 
L. U. NO. 1511, SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y. 

Pizzarello, Albert 
L. U. NO. 1513, DETROIT, MICH. 

Caltabino, Joseph 
L. U. NO. 1570, MARYSVILLE, CAL. 

Powell, Richard L. 
L. U. NO. 1590, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Campbell, William H. 

Court, E. L. 

Maki, August 
L. U. NO. 1598, VICTORIA, B. C. 

Mann, William H. 

Sams, Robert 
L. U. NO. 1613, NEWARK, N. J. 

Debenedictis, Dominick 

L. U. NO. 1622, HAYWARD, CAL. 
Alsop, Harvey L. 
Alves, John F. 
Bingham, James 
Bird, Gene A. 
Bogard, John W. 
Carter, Lewis W. 
Dilleshaw, Jess 
East, George W. 
Merriman, J. F. 
Mitchell, J. C. 
Ongman. Nels A. 
Page, Walter 
Schiager, George P. 
Soto, Albert 
Swansick, Russel 
Wilkinson, Edwin 

L. U. NO. 1693, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Goe. Charles 

McDonald, Alex 

Mootz, George 
L. U. NO. 1777, CHEBOYGAN, MICH. 

Hulseberg. Edmund 
L. U. NO. 1797, RENTON, WASH. 

Blakeslee, Ben M. 

Ellison, Helmer S. 

Houde. John E. 

Kenworthy, Russell 

McKinney, Dell N. 

Miller, Robert A. 

Nensen, Evert C. 

Prost, Alfred E. 

Walimaki, Peter 
L. U. NO. 1822, FT. WORTH, TEXAS 

Mooney. D. W. 
L. U. NO. 1835, WATERLOO, IOWA 

Aegerter, William 

Andersen, Walter 

Baird. Marion 

Beightol, A. E. 
L. U. NO. 1922, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bonke, John 

Livine, Olaf E. 

Norbut, John 

Pocius, Charles 



IARCH, 1961 



19 



A change of visual pace is presented this month 
in the Progress Report on the new Headquarters 
Building. All photos this month show activity on 
the interior. Note the view of the U. S. Capitol, 
the dome of which may be seen through a window 
in the top right picture. 






/ 




20 



THE CARPENTER 




in Red Ends are the favorite extension rules of practical 
ers everywhere. Take the X46, for example. You can see 
ty . . . in its fine hardwood finish, brass extension slide, and 

black markings imbedded in the wood for longest life! You 
xear it in the decisive "snap" of triple locking, riveted joints, 
lgth, new 16 " centers marked in red, $2.50. 
ading hardware and building supply stores feature Lufkin 

rules, tapes and tape rules. 

Measure for measure, the finest made . . . 

J UFKiN 



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white clad 50' banner® with double roller 
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exclusive White Clad® line. 16" center mark- 
ings. 50, 100-ft. lengths. 50 ft., $5.49. 



ARCH, 1961 



21 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District. Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District. Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place. Springfield. New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District. Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson. Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



TO ALL FINANCIAL SECRETARIES- 
DEATH AND DISABILITY CLAIMS 



It is the desire of the General Office to 
process and properly dispose of all applica- 
tions for funeral or disability donations as ex- 
peditiously as possible. Financial Secretaries 
can greatly assist us in that endeavor by seeing 
that each claim is completely and properly 
filled out and promptly mailed directly to the 
GENERAL TREASURER, along with the 
required supporting papers. 

As the funeral donation on the death of a 
member is payable to the decedent's estate, 
or to the person presenting proof that he or 
she has paid the funeral expenses, with each 
such claim we must have either Letters of 
Administration or the funeral bill, indicating 



22 



who the responsible person is. 

This is not required in a claim for funeral 
donation on the death of a member's wife or 
husband. In such claims the member should 
always be named as "Applicant" for the dona 
tion, unless the member for some reason is 
incompetent and unable to take care of his or 
her own affairs. In that event we should have 
Power of Attorney or Guardianship papers. 

If there are any unusual circumstances in 
connection with any claim, a full explanation 
should be forwarded with the application for 
funeral donation. By so doing you may eli- 
minate much unnecessary correspondence and 
delay in the proper adjustment of the claim. 

THE CARPENTER 



By Popular Demand 

By popular demand (as they say in 
the entertainment business) PLANE 
GOSSIP is being reinstated in the new 
magazine. The first two issues omitted 
this column and the storm of protest 
that followed literally curled the edi- 
tor's hair (what's left of it, that is). 

In this modern world, where guide- 
post and benchmarks are disappearing 
rapidly, perhaps it is a comfort to 
readers to run across jokes they heard 
at their grandfathers' knees. 

Anyway, for better or worse, 
PLANE GOSSIP is back in business 
it the same old stand. Remember, 
you asked for it. 

Day of Reckoning 

According to a women's magazine, 
March is becoming almost as popular 

month for marrying as June. The 
nagazine advances no theories as to 
why March is catching up to June. 

However, most married men will 
igree that the month a marriage takes 
slace in is immaterial. A marriage in 
ane month is just as binding as a mar- 
•iage in any other month. It's the 
nonths after marriage that are im- 
Dortant. That's when the young man 
vho thought his sweetie had a mag- 
netic personality finds out he got 
:hat impression because everything she 

Dwned was charged. 

* * * 

Drastic Prediction 

A technical magazine for the paper 
ndustry predicts that if the per capita 
:onsumption of paper increases as fast 





GOSSIP 




"I see why you told me to 
keep mum about my $2 raise! 
You granted all the union 
employes here $5 J" 



in the next 20 years as it did in the 
past 20 there will be a paper shortage 
in the country by 1981. 

We have no way of knowing how 
sound this prediction is, but if it does 
come true, who knows but what shoe 
manufacturers may have to go back 
to using leather again. 

* * ^ 

Effective Lesson 

And speaking of shoes, the Illinois 
farmer who recently got $4.89 for a 
cow hide and then went into town and 
paid $18.75 for a pair of shoes really 
knows what the skin game is. 



One Horse, One Rabbit 

Despite the fact five million are un- 
employed, despite the fact bank- 
ruptcies are hitting new peaks, several 
financial papers keep insisting things 
are wonderful just because profits are 
good and stock prices are climbing. 

The situation sort of reminds us of 
what Sydney Smith, the noted English 
preacher, once said about the status 
of spiritual life in his native land. 

"The observances of the church 
concerning feasts and fasts are toler- 
ably well kept in England," he said, 
"since the rich keep the feasts and the 
poor keep the fasts." 



It's the Person That Counts 

A noted woman author is concerned 
over what she terms a "serious break- 
down of moral standards". She 
blames the situation on the ever-in- 
creasing number of women entering 
industry who work side by side with 
men under all sorts of conditions and 
in all sorts of situations. 

Perhaps the lady has a point. But 
there never was a time when men and 
women were completely isolated from 
each other. Morality comes from 
strength of character, not from en- 
vironment. 



Our old philosopher friend, Joe 
Paup, puts it this way: 

"The girl who stays on her toes can 
always stay away from the heels." 



Different Points of View 

Congress shortly will begin debating 
the President's demand for an increase 
in the minimum wage from $1.00 an 
hour to $1.25. The debate will center 
around what constitutes a living wage. 

And the arguments should be hot 
and heavy because there is a wide 
difference of opinion on the subject. 

And the difference of opinion 
mainly stems from whether you are 
giving or getting the wage. 



New Motto 

Last month a federal judge showed 
the business world that there are teeth 
in the anti-trust law if someone has 
the intestinal fortitude to use them. 
He sentenced some nine officials of 
electrical equipment firms to jail and 
levied stiff fines against others. 

The officials were accused of fixing 
prices on the electrical equipment they 
manufacture. Involved were prac- 
tically all major manufacturers. Ironi- 
cally, TV cameras showed the execu- 
tives being led away to the Bastille 
in handcuffs — precautions that hardly 
seemed necessary. 

To our way of thinking, the West- 
inghouse motto could be rewritten as 
follows: 

"You can be sure if it's Westinghouse 
— the price will be the same as Gen- 
eral Electric." 




"Hello. My wife will be down 
and pay that bill tomorrow. 
....Who's calling, please?" 



MARCH, 1961 



23 



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same height — each one is precision-pointed. Your hand 
and circular saws (combination blades, too) will do 
better work, easier. They will stay sharp longer. Look 
for the man with a Foley Automatic Saw Filer when 
you need sharpening done. 

Retired carpenters, here's an easy one- 
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^ 



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24 



THE CARPENTER 




&uctye£Btittfo 



Lent is upon us and, apart from its 
piritual significance, it is an ideal 
ime for cutting corners on your food 
udget. How? Well, since many are 
mited in the amount of meat they 
an serve, and since meat is the big 
ost factor in meal-planning, you can 
jbstitute economy foods like fish, 
saghetti, rice and cheese with a good 
onscience. 

Fish is so versatile, so inexpensive 

d there are so many varieties to 
hoose from that there's no excuse for 
our menus to suffer from sameness 
ven during Lent. In fact, fish can be 
rved at any meal of the day, main- 
lining high nutrition levels for your 
imily. 

At breakfast, you might substitute 
re-cooked fish sticks or fish bites for 
our usual bacon or sausage. You 
an also serve them for lunch, adding 
lem to eggs to make a nourishing 
ut light omelet. 

When company's Coming for din- 
er and fish is to be the main dish, 
se frozen fish-fillets and enhance the 
avor with imaginative cooking and 

asoning. Cod with Sardine Dress- 
ig, pictured here, is an example of 
ow one good fish complements 
nother. 

Here are a few recipes featuring 

(expensive or low-calorie fish dishes 

hich, we hope, will help take some 

the sting out of Lenten meal- 

anning. 




Cod with Sardine Dressing 

2 packages (12 oz. each) frozen cod 
fillets 
Vi teaspoon salt 
V3 cup sardines, mashed 
2 tablespoons melted butter or oil 

from the sardines 
2 tablespoons chopped onion 
1 tablespoon chopped parsley 

Place frozen fillets in greased shal- 
low baking dish. Combine remaining 
ingredients and spread over fish. Bake 
in hot oven (400 degrees F.) until 
done, about 40 minutes. Makes 6 
servings. 




Shrimp with Low-Calorie Sauce 

1 pound shrimp, fresh or frozen 

2 onions, sliced 

2 tablespoons butter or margarine 
Vi cup instant non-fat dry milk 

2 tablespoons flour 

1 (1-pound 3-ounce) can tomatoes 
(2 cups) 
¥2. teaspoon salt 
Va teaspoon pepper 

Clean and cook shrimp. Cook 
onion in butter or margarine until 
soft. Thoroughly mix milk, flour, 
tomatoes, salt and pepper. Add to 
onions and cook, stirring, until mix- 
ture thickens. Add shrimp and cook 
until shrimp are heated through. 
Serve with border of toast or low- 
calorie wafers. Makes 4 servings. 

Fish and Noodles 

3 tablespoons chopped onion 
V3 cup diced celery 



1 tablespoon cooking fat or oil 
V2 teaspoon salt 
Pepper 
1% cups cooked or canned tomatoes or 

2 cups raw tomatoes cut in pieces 
1% cup cooked noodles 
2 cups flaked cooked fish 
Crumbs mixed with melted butter or 

margarine 
Cook onion and celery in fat or oil 
a few minutes. Add salt, pepper and 
tomatoes and heat to boiling. Put 
alternate layers of noodles, fish and 
hot tomato mixture in a greased bak- 
ing dish. Top witn crumbs. Bake in 
moderate oven (350 degrees F.) 20 
minutes or until the mixture is heated 
through and the crumbs are browned. 



Egg and Potato Scramble 

2 slices bacon 

4 medium-sized potatoes, sliced thin 
1 teaspoon salt 
4 eggs beaten 
Va cup milk 
Pepper 

Fry bacon slices and remove from 
fry pan. Fry potatoes in the fat until 
they are well-browned, sprinkling with 
salt as browning starts. Cover pan 
closely. Cook over low heat until 
potatoes are tender. Combine eggs, 
milk and pepper. Pour over potatoes 
in pan and cook slowly, stirring occa- 
sionally until eggs are set. Crumble 
bacon slices and add just before re- 
moving from heat. Serve at once. 

To vary this last recipe, bits of 
cooked ham, chipped beef, or any 
cooked meat may be used in place of 
the bacon. Thin slices of sausage or 
chopped chicken livers are especially 
good. Fry the potatoes in bacon fat 
or other meat drippings when omitting 
the bacon. 

Small cubes of cheese or flakes of 
smoked or frozen fish are other wel- 
come additions with their own dis- 
tinctive flavors. 



IARCH, 1961 



25 




'I. * !e3 



Golden Anniversary for L.U. 1128 



Mangam's Chateau recently was the 
scene of a very gala Golden Anni- 
versary Party at which LaGrange, 
Illinois, Local No. 1128 feted mem- 
bers of the union and their ladies with 
a delicious dinner and entertainment 
to celebrate its fifty years as a local 
union. 

Almost 800 guests, comprised of 
members and their wives or lady 
friends, were present as well as some 
very distinguished guests, among 
whom were: 

John R. Stevenson, First General 
Vice President of the Brotherhood; 
Stanley L. Johnson, ex-Vice President 
of Illinois State Federation of Labor; 



Agent; Leon Druse and John Murphy, 
Business Agents. 

Other distinguished guests were: 
Frank Frieden, Chairman of the Wel- 
fare and Pension Fund; Joe Splavec, 
Fred Prokaski, and Jack Zeilenga, 
Business Representatives of Locals 
Unions 54, 1889 and 416, respectively. 

The Pledge of Allegiance to the 
American Flag by the entire group in 
attendance gave a very fitting and im- 
pressive start to the party. 

Some well chosen words by some 
of the visiting dignitaries were favor- 
ably received. Brother Ted Kenney 
acted as master of ceremonies. 

Members who have enjoyed asso- 




Earl Welsh, President, and Jack Hill, 
Secretary, respectively, of the Illinois 
State Council of Carpenters, and the 
following officers of the Chicago Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters — Ted 
Kenney, President; Charles Thompson, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Daniel O'Connell, 
Clerk; Alex Robertson, Business 



ciation with this local since its incep- 
tion were awarded 50-year member- 
ship pins. Those present to receive 
these awards were: 

O. H. Degener, Albert Lundin, Wil- 
liam Gauger and Chris Thompson. 
Robert Matz was unable to attend due 
to illness. 



L.U. 387 Graduates 

At a recent meeting of the Carpen- 
ters Local Union No. 387, Columbus, 
Mississippi, Certificates of Completion 
were presented to a number of young 
men. Presentation was made by 
Marvin E. Taylor, business representa- 
tive and secretary of the Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee. 

The Joint Committee is composed 
of (shown in the picture, from left to 




right, standing) : Robert Forrester, 
Marvin E. Taylor, and James A. 
Swartz — all members of the union; 
and (not appearing in the picture) 
Nelson Myers, Harvey Criegler, and 
Harris McClannahan, chairman, repre- 
senting the Contractors on the Com- 
mittee. 

Seated, from left to right, are ap- 
prentices Wayne Flye, Columbus; 
Lewis Conn, Columbus; Cleo Bouchil- 
lon, Louisville; Brooks Boman, Col- 
umbus, and Robert Walker of Pickens- 
ville. 

Those earning Certificates but nof 
present owing to National Guard duty 
are: James C. Blaine, Ackerman 
Wayne West, Columbus; Cecil T 
Gibson, Jr., Columbus; Jack Speed 
Steens, and Jerry Jaudon of Aberdeen 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. . : 15, 29 

Construct-O-Wear Shoe Co., In- 
dianapolis, Ind 6 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 27 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III. . . 24 
Foley Mfg., Minneapolis, Minn... 24 and 29 
Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. .. 27 
Irwin Augur Bit Co., Wilmington, 0. 11 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. .. 21 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 11 

Skil Corporation, Chicago, 

III Inside Back Cover 

Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, 

III 28 

True Temper, Cleveland, Ohio 18 

Zapart Saw Filer, Brooklyn 22, 

N. Y 31 

Technical Courses and Books 
Audel Publishers, New York, N. Y.. 6 

Chicago Technical College, Chicago, 

III 11 

L. F. Garlinghouse Co., Inc., 

Topeka, Kans 18 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 



26 



THE CARPENTEI 



Local 792 Pays Tribute to Graduating Apprentices 




On November 22, Local Union 792, 
ockford, Illinois, held a dinner at 
e Elk's Club to honor the appren- 

es who completed their training 
jring the year. 

Pictured above are the special guests 
ho helped to make the occasion a 
emorable one. From left to right: 
Ralph Wilcox, field representative, 



Bureau of Apprenticeship, Rockford; 
Dan Dvorak, apprentice training spe- 
cialist for the A.G.C., Washington, 
D. C; Earl Welch, international rep- 
resentative, Springfield, 111.; Merle 
Drager, executive secretary, A.G.C., 
Rockford; Delmont Stewart, president, 
Local Union 792; and Clarence Nel- 
son, president, Bricklayers Local 31, 
Rockford. 



Northern Calif. Pension Fund Hands Out 1000th Check 




George W. Archer, member of 
irpenters Local 483, San Francisco, 
cently became the 1,000th carpenter 
a little over two years to retire with 
pension from the Carpenters Pension 
■ust Fund for Northern California. 
le Fund began awarding pension 
■nefits on luly 1, 1958. 
The first pension benefit check was 
esented to the 1,000th pensioner by 
irroll T. Morton, president of The 



Duncanson-Harrelson Company, Rich- 
mond, employer member and chair- 
man of the Fund's Board of Trustees; 
C. R. Bartalini, president of the State 
Council of Carpenters and Secretary- 
treasurer of the Bay Counties District 
Council of Carpenters, employe 
member and co-chairman of the 
Fund's Board of Trustees; and Al 
Figone, business agent for Local 483. 



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nickel plated steel. 

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The old reliable water level is now modernized 
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tough vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in 
each set-up, and more if necessary. With its 
special container-reservoir, only 7" dia. x 4", the 
LEVELEASY remains filled and ready for fast 
one-man leveling. Compact and durable, this 
amazing level is packed with complete illustrated 
instructions on modern liquid leveling. 

Stop wasting time and money on makeshift 
methods. Thousands of carpen- 
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have found the LEVELEASY sim- 
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just as accurate. It pays its way. 

If your tool dealer has not yet stocked Leveleasy, 
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V- 



ARCH, 1961 



27 



Safety Award Given L.U. 1020 Members by Transportation Firm 




Books That Will Help You 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 il.. covering 
general house carpentry, estimating, making win- 
dow and door frames, heavy timber framing, 
trusses, power tools, and other important building 
subjects. $3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 
p. 670 il.. and about 7.000 building trades terms 
and expressions. Defines terms and gives many 
practical building suggestions. You need this 
book. $4.00. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool explained. One of the top-best of my books 
— you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 il. 
$3.50. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 102 p., 498 il., 
covering all important steel-stniare problems. The 
most practical book on the square sold today. 
Price $3.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 il.. covering 
several of the most important branches of car- 
pentry, among them garages, finishing and stair 
building. $3.50. 

ROOF FRAMING. — 175 p. and 437 il., covering 
every branch of roof framing. The best roof 
framing book on the market. Other problems, 
including saw filing. $3.50. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
practical building problems — many of them worth 
the price of the book. Has 250 p. and 086 il. 
$3.50. 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION.— Has 163 p., 439 
il., covering concrete work, form building, screeds, 
reinforcing, scaffolding and other temporary con- 
struction. No other book like it on the market. 
$3.50. 

You can't go wrong if you buy this whole set. 
A five-day money-back guarantee, is your protec- 
tion. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Revised, illus- 
trated by Stanley Leland. Only $2.00. 

THE WAILING PLACE.— This book is made up 
of controversial prose and the fable PUSHING 
BUTTONS. Spiced with sarcasm and dry humor. 
Illustrated by the famed artist, Will Rapport. 
$3.00. 

FREE.— With 8 books. THE WAILING PLACE 
and 2 poetry books free: with 5 books. 2 poetry 
books free and with 3 books. 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 books, THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00. 
and with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Carrying charges paid only when full 
remittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to 
Canada. 

Order u u cicrcic 222 So. Const. St. 

Today. "• ■"■• JltwtLt Emporia. Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



Shipwright employes of Western 
Transportation Company, Portland, 
Oregon, were honored recently at a 
banquet for more than seven years 
without a lost-time accident. All are 
members of Carpenters Local 1020, 
Portland. 

Safety award certificate of merit 
was presented to the union crew by 
company president Leonard M. 
Thompson, with Jack Gutknecht re- 
ceiving the plaque for members of the 
local. 

The event was a banquet-safety 
meeting, with several guests present, 
including Joe Ceglar, business repre- 
sentative and financial secretary of 
Local 1020, and E. R. "Buzz" Bus- 



selle, editor of THE UNION REGIS 
TER, official publication for the unioi 
Others in attendance besides the shir 
wright crew were George H. Jacksoi 
vice president of Western Transport; 
tion Company, and George E. Ste\ 
enson, personnel manager and safet 
supervisor. 

Members of Local 1020 honore 
for the safety record included: Ton 
Setera Jr., John Frank, Jack Gutt 
necht, Ray Staudenmier, Carl Seten 
William Springer, Fred Suran, Ricl 
ard Lauman, Gordon Hastings, Re 
Peirce, Troy Chambers and Ton 
Setera Sr. Elmer Reeves was unabl 
to attend the award presentation du 
to sickness in his family. Those wh 
attended are pictured above, from lef 
to right, in the order stated. 

The crew of shipwrights does main 
tenance work for the transportatio 
company, including barges, scaffoldin 
and catwalks. Average age of th 
men is about 45. They complete 
more than 2,668 days without an ac 
cident — totaling more than 400,00 
man-hours, or in excess of seve 
years. The crew's total years em 
ployed at Western Transportation in 
volves some 162.51 years, accordin 
to Stevenson. 



Saginaw Honors Great Old Timer 



The members of Carpenters Local 
334 of Saginaw, Michigan, recently 
paid special tribute to Brother An- 
thony Brenske and his good wife at 
the Naismyth Party House. 

A goodly number of the officers 
and members and their wives were 
present, and after a wonderful chicken 
dinner Brother Brenske was presented 
with his fifty-year membership pin. 

The president of Local 334, William 
Allore, made the presentation, shown 
here. 

Brother Brenske started as an ap- 
prentice carpenter when our beloved 
deceased Brother William Hutcheson 



was business agent of Local 334 
Tony, as he is known by his friends 
has been active in the local ever sine 
he became a member. He is now ii 




bevel 

pointed ends 

most rafters, soW Wltn 

tilt elec. 

saw to 45 degrees, 

then follow top 0] 

plumb cut mark. 



ROOF FRAMING MADE EASY 
wifh the 

SWANSON SPEED SQUARE 

Frame your roof as easily as your joist or studs. Send 50c 
for RAFTER LENGTH booklet, giving lengths of all rafters 
for any size building. Also a CONSTRUCTION FOLDER: 
■■Framing a Roof with the SWANSON SPEED SQUARE." 
Many other uses in framing. 

Made from a one-piece casting of tough Aluminum Alloy 
— DEEP CAST IN FIGURES— ALWAYS EASY TO READ. 
Easy on your pocket. 7%" size. 

Indispensable for inside trim work and home workshop. 
No carpenter, home owner, farmer or handyman should be 
without this tool. Price with TWO Rafter Books $4.25 post 
paid. C.O.D. costs additional. Thousands in use. Always 
money back guarantee. 

SWANSON TOOL CO. 

9113 S. 53rd Ave., Oak Lawn, Illinois 




his seventy-second year and is workinj 
most of the time, and is as active a 
any man of forty-five. 

After dinner, conversation led t< 
things that happened in past year 
on the jobs, and particularly hov 
working conditions have improved 
how our apprentices have it so dif 
ferent, and how thankful all the mem 
bers of Local 334 are that our Broth 
erhood has enabled them to enjo; 
better wages, conditions, and living ii 
general. 



28 



THE CARPENTEI 



Local Union 1505 Builds Unusual Float 




The annual Christmas Parade spon- 
ged by the merchants of Salisbury, 
forth Carolina, last year had a new 
itry. It was the float pictured above, 
esigned and built by Local Union 
505 under the supervision of Brother 
I. J. Casper. For its first effort the 



float of the local union was given high 
praise by many of the extended hun- 
dred thousand viewers who watched 
the parade. 

The union is looking forward to 
doing even better with future parades 
entries. 



Chicago Local 54 Honors 50-Year Brothers 




Now you can use this ONE poorer feed shop 

to turn rough lumber into high-value moldings, 
trim, flooring, furniture. ..ALL popular patterns. 

RIP.. .PLANE. ..MOLD. ..separately or all at once 
by power feed. ..with a one horsepower motor. 
Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed commercial output. 

LOW COST.. .You can own this MONEY MAKING 
POWER TOOL for only...*30 00 down payment. 

Send coupon today 

BELSAW POWER TOOLS 941 field Bid:.. Kansas City 11. Mo. 
Send me complete facts on the MULTI-DUTY Power 
Toot. No obligation. 



Name_ 



Address- 
City 



.State. 



in 4 months 
spare time 



IS WHAT I MADE 
with the 

FOLEY LAWN MOWER SHARPENER 

"In my home town of 5,000 I paid for the Foley 4 or 5 
times over the first season. I also put a $1035 oil 
furnace in my new home." — B. Mathews. 
"We sharpened nearly 1000 mowers our first season 
and gained a reputation for the best work." — J. W. 
Kemper. 

"No one can go wrong with the Foley machine"— 
V. J. Patterson wrote us. Get in this CASH business 
where 99c of every dollar is YOUR profit! The Foley 
Lawn Mower Sharpener handles up to 3 or 4 mowers 
per hour. Hand mowers run $2.00 to $3.00 — power 
mowers $5.00 to $8.00. 

FREE PLAN shows how to start. Foley prices are low- 
easy payments available. Send coupon today — no 
salesman will call. 



On Wednesday night, November 16, 
hicago Local No. 54 presented four- 
en 50-year members with pins, 
efreshments were served and an en- 
lyable evening was had by all who 
:tended. 

Pictured from left to right are: 
eated) 50-year members Emil 
aucek; John Mazac; Henry Dorot- 
swicz; Vaclav Miksovsky; Marcelin 
ima; Mike Marek. (Standing): Frank 
ima; Fred Fiala. Also John Trcka, 



trustee; Joseph Prochazka, treasurer; 
Charles Thompson, secretary-treas- 
urer, Chicago District Council; John 
Lejcar, president of Local 54; Ted 
Kenney, president, Chicago District 
Council; Alex Robertson, business rep- 
resentative, Chicago District Council; 
Joseph Splavec, Local 54 business rep- 
resentative; George Marek, financial 
secretary; Anton Klir, trustee; Harry 
Brodnicki, 50-year member, and Jo- 
seph Kadlec, recording secretary. 




ith the Foley Grinder* 

so circular saws, ice 

skates, scissors, planer 

knives, all sharp edged 

mm tools. 

FOLEY MFG. CO. 
301-1 Foley Bldg., Minneapolis 1 8, Minn. 
Send FREE PLAN on lawn mower business 
and Special Combination Offer. 



IARCH, 1961 



29 



*x^r,:&->'~&-x4?^'-<!y> , ^G r *^?~''^?~'~ 



v.^^j^t^t^J'-K^c^^t^^i^x^t^; 



Zo Zke ladies 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 629 Elects Officers 




In June Ladies Auxiliary No. 629 installed these new officers, shown from left 
to right: Marie Dexter, warden; Bernice May, financial secretary; Eva Jaynes, 
conductor; Ann Parrish, vice president; Irma Reynolds, president; Rachel Stout, 
recording secretary; and Evaline Vaughn, one-year trustee. 



To the Editor: 

On June 23 we, the ladies of Auxil- 
iary No. 629, Sheffield, Alabama, in- 
stalled our new officers. They are 
shown in the accompanying picture. 

We have one business meeting and 
one social meeting each month. We 
are in our tenth year as an auxiliary. 
On the third Monday night of each 



month the auxiliary serves refresh- 
ments to our sponsoring local union 
at their meeting. 

If any of our sister auxiliaries have 
any good ideas on getting new mem- 
bers, we would love to hear from 
them. 

Rachel E. Stout, 

Recording Secretary 



Auxiliary 506 Holds Installation of Officers 



"Help Our Men," Says 759 

To the Editor: 

We have had our charter for nearly 
3VS years, and getting to know each 
other has been an experience I know 
none of us shall either regret or for- 
get. We are members of Ladies Aux- 
iliary No. 759, Anaheim, California. 

We have had plenty of little ups and 
downs, but through them all our men 
have been our main support. The 
members of our sponsoring local un- 
ion have been so good, helping us in 
ways too numerous to put on paper. 
Mostly, just knowing that we are 
wanted by them here has done more 
good than any other single factor. 

At their 40th Anniversary Day Pic- 
nic and Dance on September 10, we 
were able to obtain fifteen new mem- 
bers — with more to come. 

We feel that if you wives, mothers 
and daughters of other locals who 
have no auxiliary want to have that 
feeling of belonging to the union, talk 
to your men-folk and get an auxiliary 
started. It only needs 12 to 15 mem- 
bers to get your charter. 

It helps if you plan your meetings 
for the same nights as those on which 
your husbands meet. I believe thai 
the main object of all Carpenter lo 
cals' auxiliaries is to help our men — 
and how better can we do this than 
by getting them to take an interesi 
and an active part in their union? 
Muriel A. Virgo, 
Recording Secretary 
11581 Reva Dr. 
Garden Grove, Calif. 





To the Editor: 

We are enclosing a picture taken at 
the installation of officers of our Car- 
penters' Ladies Auxiliary No. 506, 
San Diego, California, on July 11, 
1960. 

Reading from left to right in the 
picture, the officers are: Marg Whitely, 
junior past president of the California 
State Council of Carpenters' Aux- 
iliaries, our new installing officer; 
Ethel Thorson, chaplain; Bertha 
Parker, conductor; Ida Marie Hiatt, 
financial secretary-treasurer and State 



Council Board Member for our Dis- 
trict; Marie K. Duncan, retiring presi- 
dent and secretary elect; Ollie Lossing, 
warden; Ruth Palmer, vice president; 
Gladys Bell, trustee; Sue Hider, presi- 
dent; and Lois Scharnhorst, trustee. 
Absent at the time the photograph was 
taken was Hazel Lindebrekkee, trustee. 
The flag shown in the picture con- 
tains 50 stars and was presented to us 
by members of the boys of Woodcraft 
Sportsmen Club No. 304, sponsored 
by the Omaha Woodmen of the World 



through the friendship of Brother C 
C. Lossing, one of the members o 
our brother Local No. 1296, Sai 
Diego. 

Each of the boys who participatec 
in the presentation gave us a shor 
talk on what he personally is learnin; 
in the Club, which was very interest 
ing, well presented, and well receive( 
by the audience. 

Marie K. Duncan, Secretary 
3354 N. Mountain View Drive 
San Diego 16, Calif. 



30 



THE CARPENTE1 




THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and 
published. Send along your pet trick 
for making a job easier. It can earn 
you five dollars and the gratitude of 
your fellow members. Include a rough 
sketch from which we can make a 
drawing. When the same idea is sub- 
mitted by more than one reader, the 
letter bearing the earliest postmark 
will be awarded the check. 

Homemade T-Square 

My home-made T-square is very 
handy for marking plywood, gyp 
board, etc. It can be used for squar- 
ing or for marking 16" centers by 
using a pencil in the holes. 






i 
T 



I leave the 4x8 sheets on the floor 
or leaning against the wall and square 
them for cutting, mark 16" centers 
and cut them without handling them 
on and off saw horses. 

Bruce V. Reppert 

R. D. #3, Boyertown, Pa. 

(L.U. 492, Reading) 

88-Year-old Member Sends Tip 

I notice Brother Hauser's remedy 
for driving hard-to-drive nails, in the 



February CARPENTER. If the wax 
in the handle gives out, I submit the 
following: Draw the nail through your 
hair a couple of times, if you have any 
hair, and see how easy it will drive 
in the hardest of wood. 

And this for the ladies: The next 
time you change the folding panties 
on the baby, draw the safety pin 
through your hair and see how easy 
it will go through the thick folds of 
cloth, wet or dry. 

Incidentally, I am 88 years old and 
joined the United Brotherhood in 
1912 and have never been behind in 
my dues. 

William Kilburn 
(L. U. 829, Santa Cruz) 
1140 N. Howard St. 
Glendale 7, Calif. 



Putty Removal Tip 

When removing putty to replace 
glass in either wood or metal channels, 
I find it very convenient to take a Vi 
inch pistol-grip electric drill with a Va 
inch twist drill inserted in it. By hold- 
ing the bit at about a 60 degree angle, 
I can quickly and efficiently remove 
all the putty regardless of how hard 
it may be. With a little care this sys- 
tem gets an annoying job done in a 
very short time. 

George Sarno, Sr. 
(L. U. 620, Madison, N.J.) 
105 Summit Ave. 
Chatham, N. J. 



Marking Tip 

Many carpenters use a white lead 
pencil on dark surfaces; however, on 
some surfaces such as pre-finished 
wood, very dark formica, and mottled 
finishes, a line is hard to see. I stick 
masking tape about where the lines 
should be, then lay out and put the 
lines on the masking tape, making 
the lines easy to see. 

Bruce V. Reppert 

R. D. 3, Boyertown, Pa. 

(L. U. 492, Reading) 



Good Identification 

Identify your tools permanently 
with your name, as though it were put 
on by manufacture. Clean area to be 
marked, melt paraffin over area, print 




/_ MELTED 
-FF1N 



name in paraffin making sure lettering 
is free of paraffin, then apply drug 
store iodine to lettering. Let stand a 
few minutes, wash off with water, 
scrape off paraffin and oil tool. 

Arnold B. Elkins 
(L. U. 2203) 
127 N. Dahlia Drive 
Anaheim, Calif. 



"Nail Shooter" 

I would like to submit a little gadget 
I call a nail shooter. Take a piece of 
V4 inch pipe about 16 inches long 
and a piece of cold roll steel rod about 
the same diameter. By putting the 




Circular and Handsaw Filer S100 
Circular and Handsaw Setter S78 
Circular Saw Setter S24.50 
For details send a clear address to 

ZAPART SAW FILER 

586-c Manhattan Avenue. Brooklyn 22, N. Y. 



ZAPART SAW FILER 
516-C Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn 22, N. V. 



steel rod inside the pipe you can drop 
a nail into the end and drive it in spots 
where you could not use a hammer. 
Hope this trick can be of some use to 
my brother carpenters. 

S. G. Anderson 
1907 Chestnut 
Hannifal, Mo. 



'URCH, 1961 



31 



IN CONCLUSION 



^ ^Wlii 



w. 





Study is no substitute for $ $ $ 

I have had my first opportunity to look over the 
various reports drawn up by the White House Confer- 
ence on Aging, held in Washington last January. The 
reports fill some dozen volumes. 

Essentially the Conference was a study session. Its 
purpose was to pinpoint the problems of senior citizens 
rather than suggest cures. 

Basically I have no quarrel with a conference to study 
problems of the aging. However, Americans have a 
propensity for studying problems to death. When official 
census figures show that two-thirds of our older citizens 
have to live on an income of less than $100 a month, it 
takes no study to realize that such people have a hard 
time getting by. 

The "experts" on problems of the aging (and there are 
thousands of them) break down the problems of older 
citizens into three main categories: health, housing and 
recreation. I agree with these classifications. But to my 
way of thinking, there is only one real problem — lack 
of sufficient income. 

There is no shortage of hospitals and doctors; only a 
shortage of these services at prices pensioners can pay. 
Similarly, there is a good supply of housing if you can 
pay $300 per month. And keeping amused presents no 
problem to the retiree who can spend the winter in 
Bermuda and the summer in the fishing areas of Michi- 
gan and Wisconsin. 

The problems of the aging stem primarily from the 
fact they do not have sufficient income to compete for 
goods and services with employed people. The problems 
can be studied, analyzed and dissected from here to 
Doomsday and this basic fact will not be changed. 

Some of the do-gooders from colleges, social agencies, 
etc., who are endlessly holding conferences and commit- 
tee meetings on problems of the aging, occasionally 
criticize organized labor for not entering more enthus- 
iastically into these study sessions. 

Some of this criticism may be justified, but to my way 
of thinking our Brotherhood District Councils in Chi- 
cago, New York, Detroit, California, and elsewhere that 
negotiated and put into effect good pension programs 
have done more to solve the problems of our older 
members than all the meetings ever held. All the coun- 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 

seling and advice in the world cannot take the place of 
an extra $60 to $100 per month. 

Our Brotherhood was concerned with the hardships 
of old age long before many of today's "experts" were 
born. Our outstanding Home for Aged Members at 
Lakeland, Florida, and our own modest membership 
pension program dating back 30 years attest to this fact. 

What courses the experts will pursue now that the 
White House Conference has brought about the ultimate 
study of problems of the aging I do not know. But for 
my part I hope organized labor will continue to concen- 
trate on negotiating and broadening pension programs. 

Of course there are many things the government could 
and should do to alleviate the plight of senior citizens. 
For example. Congress could add Forand-type medical 
aid legislation for oldsters to the existing Social Security 
setup. It could greatly broaden housing legislation to 
give retired citizens a better break. But the long-range 
hope of senior citizens for decent living is higher income 
secured through collective bargaining. 



This is free enterprise? 



For individuals who are constantly orating about the 
advantages of free enterprise, many businessmen seem 
very loath to practice it. The growing wave of mergers 
since the end of World War II bears witness to this un- 
usual phenomenon. Many businessmen find it more 
comfortable to join 'em than fight 'em. Every week 
finds more firms joining hands to eliminate the necessity 
of competing. 

However, last month saw the ultimate in hand-joining 
when Federal Judge J. Cullen Ganey handed down jail 
sentences or stiff fines to some 29 executives of firms 
manufacturing electrical equipment. The men were 
found guilty of getting their heads together to fix prices 
through agreement rather than competition. 

According to newspaper accounts, some two billion 
dollars' worth of business was involved in the price 
fixing scheme. Who can say how much was added to the 
cost of living by this one cozy understanding to fix 
prices? Who can say how much such shenanigans hurt 
our prestige throughout the world? 

In handing down the sentences, Judge Ganey summed 
the situation up as follows: 

"This (price-fixing conspiracy) is a shocking indictment 
of a vast section of our economy — virtually every manu- 
facturer of electrical equipment. What is at stake here 
is the survival of the kind of economy under which 
America has grown to greatness — the free enterprise 
system. 

"You have flagrantly mocked the free enterprise 
system which we profess," the judge told the corpora- 
tion officials. "You have destroyed the model which we 
offer to the free world." 

This is free enterprise? 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




\\\f 



1924. 



1936 







\ 



t*i%JW 



Z V 




1956 



1961 



Now! Best Skilsaw models in 36 years! 

with new "Burnout Protection" motors, backed by full year FREE service policy! 



Take it from us — you simply can't 
afford not to use these newest versions 
of world famous Skil worm-drive saws, 
they're that much better! 

12 major improvements. To start 
with, we took the finest Skil power saws 
ever made (the &Y 2 " Model 367, 7J4" 
Model 77 and 8 1 {" Model 825) and gave 
them new B-P motors that give " Burn- 
out Protection" even during frequent, 
excessive overloads. Next, we made oil 
level control and oil pressure relief auto- 
matic. Then we added a new airflow 



hood for better cooling, and the con- 
venience of an easier-to-read bevel 
gauge and a telescoping blade guard that 
can't bind even on trickiest miter cuts. 
The list of improvements goes on and on 
to make these, unquestionably, the 
finest saws ever to carry the name 
"Skilsaw" . . . and that's saying a lot! 
Ask your Skil distributor for more infor- 
mation, today. Look under "Tools- 
Electric" in the Yellow Pages. Or write: 
Skil Corporation, Dept. 152C, 5033 
Elston Avenue, Chicago 30, Illinois. 







(1) New plastic-covered top handle for 
cooler handling. (2) Automatic oil level 
control. (3) New air flow hood. (4) 
Push-button blade lock. (5) Easy-to- 
read bevel gauge. (6) Stronger steel 
foot. (7) New sawdust ejector system. 




7.. and SKILSAW POWER TOOLS 



To Stem the 
Tide — Look 
For The 
UNION LABEL 
On Everything 
You BUY! 



AMERICAN JOBS 



I AMERICAN GOOD 
PROTECT AMERICAN JOBS. 



MRlKEiNmElR] 









mil 


w 




i 


M ■! 




• *. 







f'A- : ?'-.'X^ ■■'■' ' 





Don't blindfold him! 



THE MAN in this picture is a cancer research scien- 
tist. The device he is using looks like something 
out of science fiction — but actually, it's an electron 
microscope. It shows the sub-microscopic detail of a 
cancer cell— magnified 100.000 times. The cost of one 
electron microscope is $35,000. 

Some of the equipment needed for cancer research 
is even more expensive. 

Today, in research centers throughout the country, 
1300 scientists, supported by American Cancer 
Society funds, are at work searching for the cause of 
cancer — and, ultimately, ways to prevent it. 



The American Cancer Society grants millions of 
dollars for research on such projects as the study of 
viruses as a possible cause of cancer — the develop- 
ment of hormone treatments for cancer— the control 
of cancer by drugs. Life-and-death projects. 

Your help is needed to enable the American Cancer 
Society to continue this support. 

Don't blindfold cancer research. Give to it. Send 
your contribution now, to CANCER, c/o your local 
post office. All gifts are tax-deductible. 

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY 




THE COVER 

This month's cover is a spectacular four-color affair which 
shows one of our mighty Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles 
about to soar forth from its launching pad. As the cover 
legend indicates, this is a Titan, one of the ICBM's which 
the United States is counting on to add to its power of 
protection for the free world. The use of the ICBM on 
the cover has added significance in light of the fact that the 
Building and Construction Trades Department affiliates 
have joined in signing an agreement on missile work. This 
agreement is the subject of an editorial on page. 6. Further 
information on the Titan and its base will be found in the 
special report beginning on page 8 which tells about the 
visit of a number of building tradesmen to Beale Air Force 
Base. The Carpenters are glad to join with sister crafts in 
the construction of the mighty bases for America's great 
arsenal of freedom. (Photo courtesy the Martin Company) 



@fi\EP 




Uniuo Brothsrhooo oe Carpenters and Joiners of America 



THE Good Book tells us that 
some day the sword shall be 
forged into a pruning hook. But 
:hat day is not yet. The awesome 
weapon decorating this month's 
:over eloquently gives proof of this. 
That a weapon of such incredible 
destructiveness should be looked 
upon as an instrument of peace 
seems ironic. However, such is the 
case. 

Faced as we are with a totally 
ruthless potential enemy, who under- 
stands and respect only force, force 
must be our first line of defense. 
Hence the missile bases abuilding 
around the nation make up a vital 
ink in our national security chain. 
Labor has given its word that 
tothing that patience, cooperation, 
ind good will can prevent will be 
illowed to interfere with prompt 
:ompletion of the missile program. 
That word will be kept. 
But the thought remains that 
hen lasting peace is finally achieved 
will be the result of a better idea 
ither than a better weapon. Until 
hat better idea bursts forth on the 
orizon, our hopes must be pinned 
n the retaliatory might of weapons 
itch as the Titan. 



VOLUME LXXXI 



Peter Terzick, Editor 
APRIL, 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

3 1961 Building Trades Legislative Conference 

8 Missile Site Briefing 

13 Canadian Section 

24 Apprentice Contests are Big Events 

26 Building Progress Report 



NO. 4 



DEPARTMENTS 


2 


Washington Roundup 


6 


Editorials 


15 


In Memoriam 


16 


Official Information 


17 


Budget Battle 


19 


Outdoor Meanderings 


20 


Short-Cuts 


21 


What's New 


23 


Plane Gossip 


27 


Local Union News 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Charge of address cards on Form 3579-P should be sent (o THE 
CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington 18, D. C, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20(: in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



PUMP PRIMING EFFORT Whatever else can be said about the new Kennedy Adminis- 
tration, no one can deny it is making a valiant effort to pump more purchasing 
power into the sagging economy. 

Whether the transfusions are big enough and prompt enough to get the rich 
red blood of prosperity coursing through our economic veins again remains to be 
seen. But at least action has replaced slogans and rosy statistics. 

President Kennedy summarized his views on the recession in his State of 
the Union message late in January. At that time he said: 

"We cannot afford to waste idle hours and empty plants while awaiting the 
end of a recession. We must show the world what a free economy can do — to reduce 
unemployment, to put unused capacity to work, to spur new productivity, and to 
foster higher economic growth within a framework of sound fiscal policies and 
relative price stability." 

Apparently he means what he says. 

KENNEDY ACTIONS TO DATE 1. Directed earlier payment of 257 million dollars 
of 1961 G. I. insurance dividends. 2. Ordered faster repayment of some 4 billion 
dollars in income tax refunds. 3. Made 724 million dollars in Federal highway 
funds available to states ahead of schedule. 4. Speeded up processing of urban 
renewal loans and 350 million dollars in loans for local hospitals and schools 
in Federally-affected areas and waste treatment plants. (However these programs 
are matching-funds programs and little will be accomplished unless states act 
promptly to fulfill their obligations). 5. Lowered interest rates on FHA-insured 
loans. (This program, too, has been largely nullified by lenders stepping up 
their discount rates) . 

FIRST LEGISLATION PASSED When the House and Senate, late last month, adopted the 
bill extending unemployment insurance for 13 weeks, the Kennedy New Frontier 
program cleared the first hurdle. 

Passage of the measure means that millions of unemployed, who already had 
used up their unemployment benefits, will now be eligible for another 3 months. 
Several million people will be aided thereby and the new purchasing power they 
have acquired through the measure should help to stimulate the sale of goods. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS The New Frontier visualized by President Kennedy includes 
a great many legislative steps designed to stabilize the economy and eliminate 
hardship among the less privileged. He has asked: 

1. That Social Security benefits be liberalized considerably. He suggests 
an increase in the minimum pension from $33 to $43 per month, reduction of the 
eligible age for men from 65 to 62 and a boost to aged widows' pensions. 

2. He wants an increase in the minimum wage from $1.00 to $1.25 an hour, 
with coverage for an additional 4.3 million workers. 

3. He also proposes that the Federal government provide 5.6 billion dollars 
over the next 5 years to aid education. 2.3 billion of this would be expended 
over the next 3 years for the construction of new schools and betterment of 
teachers' salaries. His education program also provides for broadened loans to 
help colleges build housing facilities. 

BOLD APPROACH Adding up all these programs advocated by President Kennedy, 
it is obvious that he means business. 

So far only his unemployment insurance suggestions have been adopted by 
Congress, but all the other measures are being pushed vigorously. Whether they 
pass or go down to defeat is up to Congress. 

But it will also be up to us, because our support or lack of support can 
be the difference between victory and defeat. It is more important than it has 
ever been that we keep abreast of developments in Congress and stand ready to 
throw our weight behind those measures adding to our stability and prosperity. 

2 THE CARPENTE1 




"We in the building trades have a 
Dig job ahead and we as Carpenters 
are determined to do our part in push- 
ng the general objectives of our 
:rafts," General President M. A. 
Hutcheson told 450 members at a 
business session last month held in 
injunction with the Seventh Annual 
National Legislative Conference of the 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
jartment AFL-CIO. 

The business session of the Car- 
jenter delegation followed a luncheon 

General President M. A. Hutcheson 
iddresses more than 400 Carpenter 
lelegates at the 1961 Building and 
Construction Trades Legislative Con- 
ference in Washington, D. C. 




honoring the members present from 
local unions, city, district and state 
bodies from all parts of the country. 

Speaking also at the business session 
were Vice President O. William Blaier 
who was also chairman of the meet- 
ing, and General Secretary Robert 
Livingston. 

The Carpenter delegation was the 
largest of any attending the annual 
session which had more than 3500 
delegates. The conference was a four- 
day affair during which: 

1. The delegates met in opening 
session to hear addresses from 
AFL-CIO President George Meany, 
Department President C. J. Haggerty 
and a number of members of Congress 
and Government officials. 

2. For two days the visiting dele- 
gates called on Representatives and 
Senators on Capitol Hill. The dele- 
gates were asked to acquaint their 
members in Congress with the 10- 
point program being sponsored by the 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment. 

3. The various union and state 
groups held special meetings in con- 
nection with their legislative objectives. 

4. On the final day of the confer- 
ence delegates on a state-by-state 
basis reported on their visits to Capitol 
Hill and gave an appraisal of prospects 
and promises of the departmental pro- 
gram. 

Department President C. J. Hag- 



gerty presided at the general sessions 
and gave the keynote speech stressing 
the importance of the on-site picketing 
bill as the "Objective No. 1." 

AFL-CIO President George Meany 
called an attack on unemployment the 
primary goal of both AFL-CIO and 
the Building Trades legislative pro- 
grams. 

Secretary of Labor Arthur Gold- 
berg brought a message from President 
John F. Kennedy pled t 'ng support 
for the situs picketing legislation. 

Senator Pat McNamara blasted the 
false charges being made by the 
enemies of labor against the situs bill. 

Louis Sherman, department counsel, 
reviewed legal developments. 

Andrew J. Biemiller, AFL-CIO 
Legislative Director, asked for help in 
two immediately pending measures: 
minimum wage and aid to education. 

A message from Representative 
Adam Clayton Powell, chairman. 
House Committee on Education and 
Labor, pledged support for labor's 
program, but urged consideration by 
the trades for the civil rights question. 

Representative Carl Perkins, Dem., 
Ky., renewed his support for the 
BCTD program. 

Senator Thomas H. Kuchel, Rep., 
Calif., called for equality of treatment 
of building tradesmen with other 
unionist. 

Senator Wayne Morse, Dem., Ore., 
urged passage of an aid to education 



PRIL, 1961 






bill without amendments providing for 
aid to non-public schools. 

Representative Frank Thompson, 
Jr., co-sponsor with Senator Mc- 
Namara of a situs picketing bill, urged 
delegates to have their members ex- 
press their opinions and support to 
Congress on progressive legislation. 

Senator Joseph Clark, Dem., Pa., 
advocated passage of his public works 
bill providing for 45 per cent grants 
for works along lines of the old Public 
Works Administration program. 

On the final day of the conference 
the delegates heard short addresses 
from Charles A. Donahue, Solicitor, 
Department of Labor, and from Jerry 
Holleman, Assistant Secretary of La- 
bor. Donahue was formerly research 
director of the United Association. 
Holleman was president of the Texas 
AFL-CIO. 

On the final day the delegates filed 
reports on a state-by-state basis con- 
cerning the attitude of members of 
the House and Senate on the 10-point 
program. 

The Carpenters' delegation met in a 
business session at the Statler Hotel to 
discuss problems confronting the 
building trades in general and the In- 
ternational Union in particular. The 
report of the General President cov- 
ered a wide variety of topics given 
both on the record and "off the 
record". 

President Hutcheson noted the 
adoption of the missile site policy of 
the Building and Construction Trades 
Department and said that it is in the 
interest of all the trades participating 
in this construction activity to comply 
with the letter and spirit of the policy. 
He warned that failure of the building 
trades to pursue a policy which would 
avoid work stoppages on these vital 
defense installations would endanger 
the jurisdiction of the building trades. 
And. he emphasized, stoppages of 
work, it is apparent, would certainly 
jeopardize the defense program of the 
nation at a critical time in our history. 

Mr. Hutcheson praised the new 
agreement signed by the Department 
with the National Constructors Asso- 
ciation. A procedure has been adopted 
whereby, on a voluntary basis, dis- 
putes other than jurisdictional ones, 
can be resolved within the friendly 
framework of relationships set up be- 
tween the trades and the Association. 

A "big step forward" has been taken 
by the Carpenters with the signing of 
an agreement with the Gypsum and 
Dry Wall Association, Hutcheson re- 
ported. All members affiliated with 
this Association are parties and bound 




by the agreement developed. The 
speaker said that dry wall is a big 
factor now and one of growing im- 
portance in the future and the agree- 
ment represented a progressive step 
in handling the mutual relationships 
of Carpenters and management. 

The General President discussed the 
problems of jurisdictional disputes 
briefly and pointed out that in times 
of economic stress and unemployment, 
jurisdictional disputes are likely to in- 
crease in number. This has been a 
fact in the present slump, he said, and 
he noted that the real remedy in juris- 
dictional disputes is that of our getting 
on the job promptly and getting the 
work assignment to which Carpenters 
are rightfully entitled. 

Relationships with other building 
trades unions were discussed including 
the pending agreement with the Lath- 
ers on acoustical ceilings, and prob- 

Department President C. J. Haggerty 
welcomes General President M. A. 
Hutcheson to the session which was 
attended by more than 3500 building 
trades delegates. 



A view of the Carpenter business ses- 
sion held during the Legislative Con- 
ference. 

lems of working with the Sheet Meta 
Workers and the Ironworkers. 

The Construction Industry Join 
Conference was praised as an enter 
prise which has resulted in a bette: 
understanding and better relationship: 
among the trades and between tht 
trades and employers. He said tha 
this conference had been formed wit! 
representatives of contractors and th< 
affiliates of the Building and Construe 
tion Trades Department. A majo 
asset of this Conference he said wa 
in the growing recognition of the im 
portance of maintenance contracts 
This type of work is of great impoi 
tance to a number of the buildin 
trades and especially to the Carpenter; 

The General President closed wit' 
a brief report on membership and 
strong plea for the union label. H 
called on the delegates to encourag 
their members to realize the impoi 
tance of the label and not to relax i 
the use and recognition of the labe 





Secretary Robert Livingston invited 
the delegates to visit the new Cor- 
penters Headquarters Building during 
their stay in Washington. He said 
that the building, located near the 
Capitol, would be en-route to their 
congressional visits. 

The speaker described the building 
and gave facts and figures on its 
physical dimensions and reviewed the 
use of wood within the building which 
he said adds immeasurably to the 
beauty of the structure. The building 
should be completed by the last of 
April he said and steps are now being 
taken to purchase furniture and fix- 
tures so that the new headquarters 
can be made ready at the earliest 
possible date. 

Mr. Livingston noted that since 
construction started there had not been 
a ""single jurisdictional dispute on the 
job". 

In his remarks as meeting chair- 
man. Vice President Blaier said that 
labor has always been in the forefront 
of the fight for progressive legislation 
and economic abundance. He said 
that these days labor must pay atten- 
tion to politics in order to cope with 
the economic problems of the day. He 
called on the membership to take 
more interest in public affairs, for he 
said ""an increased awareness of the 
relationship between politics and eco- 
nomic policy is absolutely essential to 
Ifbor " 

Mr. Blaier also touched on the im- 
portance of maintenance contracts 
and paid tribute to General President 
Hutcheson who put forth the idea of 



this type of contract and agreement 
between contractors and the trades 
some years ago. a fact that is just now 
being accorded the recognition it de- 
serves. The speaker also commented 
on the work of the National Joint 
Board for the Settlement of Jurisdic- 
tional Disputes. 

Reverend Joseph L. Donahue, chap- 
lain of the Chicago and Cook County 
Building Trades and now a member 
of the Chicago District Council of 
Carpenters, gave the invocation and 
made a few brief remarks. 

Chairman Blaier introduced the 
guests at the head table including: 

• First District Board Member 
Charles Johnson. Jr. 

• Fifth District Board Member 
Leon W. Greene 

• Sixth District Board Member 
J. O. Mack 

• Eighth District Board Member 
J. F. Cambiano 

• Charles Donahue. Solicitor of 



Vice President O. William Blaier was 
chairman of the Carpenter business 
session during the off-the-record-meet- 
ing in Washington. 

the U. S. Department of Labor 

• Stuart Rothman, General Coun- 
sel of the National Labor Relations 
Board 

• Edward Goshen. Acting Direc- 
tor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training. U. S. Department of Labor 

• Al Ganno. Chief Wage Determi- 
nation Bureau. Davis-Bacon Division, 
U. S. Department of Labor 

• Thomas Neblett, Executive Di- 
rector. Gypsum and Dry Wall Con- 
tractors International 

• Kenneth Kleinsorge, Secretary, 
National Acoustical Contractors As- 
sociation 

• Irvin Manger, Labor Relations 
Officer, Corps of Army Engineers 

• Ed Patrick. U. s! Air~Force Pro- 
curement and Production Officer 

The chairman introduced a number 
of other visitors attending the lunch- 
eon including: 

• James Miller and James Baierd. 
Assistant Solicitors, Department of 
Labor 

• Harry Livingston, Clerk of the 
House of Representatives, and brother 
of General Secretary Livingston 

• Leon Wofford and Frank Laretti, 
Carpenter members now affiliated with 
the Federal Public Housing Adminis- 
tration 

• Hal Jennrich, Bureau of Appren- 
ticeship. Department of Labor 

• Thomas Jones, Navy's Bureau of 
Yards and Docks 

• Herbert Skinner, Regional Direc- 
tor, Building and Construction Trades 
Department 

General Secretary R. E. Livingston 
was one of the speakers. He is at 
left applauding Stuart Rothman, 
General Counsel of the NLRB. 




APRIL. 1961 



ISMTOJRJAIL 



LABOR COMES THROUGH AGAIN 

The Building and Trades Construction Department, 
AFL-CIO, has made a direct and clear statement on 
the urgent need of all unions to aid in the accelera- 
tion of the U. S. missile program. 

It is obvious to any thoughtful citizen 
that our national security and that of the 
free world is closely linked to the swift 
completion of the U. S. missile bases 
throughout the world. 
In a recent resolution the Department announced 
the following policy in connection with the missile 
program which is to apply to all national and inter- 
national unions affiliated with the Department, their 
constitutent local unions and the various state and 
local building trades councils: 

"I. All local and national procedures for the 
settlement of labor disputes without interruption 
of construction shall be complied with strictly, 
including the procedures of the National Joint 
Board for the Settlement of Jurisdictional Dis- 
putes. 2. No strike, picketing, or work stoppage 
shall be undertaken on any missile project by a 
local union without complete exhaustion of all 
available procedures and methods for the peace- 
ful settlement of the dispute and the prior author- 
ization of the General President of the National 
or International Union with which the local union 
is affiliated. 3. No State or Local Building Con- 
struction Trades Council shall render any aid, 
assistance or support to any local union which 
strikes, pickets or engages in a work stoppage 
which violates this policy; nor shall any State 
or Local Building and Construction Trades Coun- 
cil recognize any strike, picketing or work stop- 
page which violates this policy. 4. Each Gen- 
eral President of the affiliated National and 
International Unions and the President of the 
Department shall notify all constitutent local 
unions and local and state building and con- 
struction trades councils of this missile project 
policy and take appropriate action to implement 
this policy." 
This resolution stands in the best tradition of 
American labor which has always been a loyal, hard- 
working member of the team when the nation faced 
a crisis. 




LET'S HIT CANCER 
A FATAL BLOW 

The reports on cancer are encouraging. There are 

some hopeful signs that medical research stands on 

the threshold of one of those historic breakthroughs 

that will reveal the final, dreadful secrets of cancer. 

We all recall the great sense of relief that came 

with the discovery of Salk vaccine. We knew 

that we had finally laid low an old enemy of 

mankind — polio. Dare we hope we are near the 

same goal with cancer? 

We can do more than hope. We can help. April 

has been designated as Cancer Control Month. During 

this month the American Cancer Society will conduct 

its annual educational and fund-raising crusade. Let 

us all lend a hand. When the cancer volunteer worker 

comes to call, let us welcome him. Let us give 

generously so that the highly expensive research can 

go forward and bring nearer that blessed day when 

the word "cancer" loses its fearful meaning. 

Help turn on the bright lights of research, 
education and service so that the human race 
can take another great stride forward in the sun. 




YOU CAN HAVE IT FREE, 
MR. PRESIDENT 

In the first weeks and months of President 
Kennedy's administration the press has treated its 
readers to a rash of articles about the reading habits 
of the President of the United States. This has taken 
a number of people by surprise. Most citizens have 
taken it for granted that anybody who is President 
would be well read. 

LIFE magazine went into this matter in con- 
siderable detail in a recent issue. According to 
their editors, "He eats up words at the rate of 
1,200 per minute — the average is about 250. He 
begins his day by reading 5 newspapers before 
he reaches the office. In government circles the 
word is out — 'Be careful with that memo, the 
President is likely to read every word of it.' One 
advisor recalls seeing the President read a 26- 

THE CARPENTER 



page economics memo in 10 minutes and then 
ask 25 intelligent questions about it." 

Life magazine carefully lists the newspapers and 
magazines the President regularly reads. It is im- 
pressive. Any man could lay claim to knowing a 
great deal after this intellectual diet. But some of us 
were struck by a notable absence from the list. There 
is not one labor newspaper or magazine on the Presi- 
dent's reading desk. 

We are hopeful he does not count on Business 
Week or the Wall Street Journal to keep him 
informed on the thinking of organized labor. We 
think we are in a position to recommend a num- 
ber of splendid labor periodicals to the President. 
In fact, we know of one that is published by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America that we would be glad to send him 
free each month. All he has to do is ask us for it. 




GOOD QUESTION 

How is it that dollars sent overseas to help the 
underprivileged and dispossessed of foreign lands are 
classified as good works and Christian neighborliness, 
while dollars spent at home to aid our own poor and 
infirm rate as socialism, paternalism, and un- 
Americanism? 



THE CHERRY TREE IS HUNG 
WITH SNOW 

It has been a long and bitter winter. Not only was 
the country beset by one of the coldest winters in 
recent years but it was a winter of unemployment that 
brought privation and human suffering. As this issue 
of The Carpenter goes to press in its new home in 
Washington it is spring. Warm winds sweep through 
the District of Columbia. The trees are in bud. There 
is a great sense of the re-newal of life. Along Consti- 
tution Avenue, near the U. S. Capitol, the workers 
are busy in the warm sunshine completing the new 
home of the Carpenters Brotherhood. The gleaming 
white building stands proudly among its aristocratic 
neighbors, the National Gallery of Art and the Con- 
gressional office buildings. The onlooker forgets the 
tyranny of the recent winter. All life seems good 
again. God is in His heaven and all is right with the 
world. No problems seem too large. With faith, 
courage and confidence we re-new our fight for a 
better world for every human being. This is the spirit 
of spring. 



LET'S BE SENSIBLE ABOUT THE 
PEACE CORPS 

Among President Kennedy's many proposals in the 
opening days of his administration none has excited 
the public imagination more than the Peace Corps 
plan. This is good. The Peace Corps is designed to 
enlist the aid of young people in America's unending 
quest for peace. The enthusiastic response of young 
Americans should be convincing proof to even the 
most cynical critic that America and Americans are 
still idealistic. We still respond to human need. In 
our comparatively short history we have written a 
record of generosity. The Peace Corps is but another 
chapter in our attempt to expand the American 
dream. 

Perhaps a word or two of caution is in order. 
The Peace Corps is not a "fun" project. It is not 
meant as an "escape" for bored, frustrated 
younsters who are seeking a gala trip abroad. 
It is a most serious business. Only the truly 
dedicated should be selected to serve. Americans 
must understand that in order to offset the false 
lure of Communism we must help the world to 
solve many of its age-old problems of poverty, 
disease and ignorance. But these problems must 
be solved in the context of the peoples, cultures, 
continents and political and economic systems 
involved. This must not become a "Madison 
Avenue Crusade" in which we attempt to cram 
down the throats of underdeveloped countries 
our own highly developed society. We cannot 
offer tractors in areas where they have not yet 
heard of the steel plow a century after its inven- 
tion. Patience, understanding and sympathy 
blended with plain, American horse sense should 
be the philosophy of the Peace Corps. Then we 
can help others to help themselves to peace and 
prosperity. 

'It's a Two-Man Job' 




APRIL, 1961 



Buildin 




am gets 



Abbott and Costello got rich doing 
a skit called, "Who's On First", a 
masterpiece of confusion and frustra- 
tion. 

In the Halls of Congress and in the 
editorial offices of many newspapers 
and magazines a real-life version of 
"Who's On First" seems to be building 
up; only in this instance it is called, 
"Who's Ahead in the Missile Race?" 

As suits their political inclinations, 
politicians insist we are way ahead of 
the Russians or way behind. The 
"outs" view with alarm and the "ins" 
point with pride. The hassle is enough 
to give unenlightened citizens the 
shrieking meemies. 



But to hundreds of Air Force offi- 
cers and thousands upon thousands of 
building trades mechanics who bear 
the responsibility for completing the 
vast missile base program on schedule, 
the political arguments are academic. 
Ahead or behind, they know the fu- 
ture safety of the United States and 
the whole free world depends on com- 
pletion of the missile base program in 
the shortest possible time. 

In the wastelands of Montana and 
the deserts of Utah, building trades- 
men are plying their skills to get the 
job done on schedule. They are fight- 
ing cold, sand, dust and rugged ter- 
rain — often far from the comforts and 



-^IJBWbL 




THE CARPENTER 



' 



Finlay Allan, assistant to the General President, cen- 
ter foreground, is shown with group of building 
tradesmen visiting site at Missile Air Force Base. 




imusements of city life. The snafus 
it the drawing boards and the sound 
.nd the fury in the political forums 
re all far removed from the grime 
nd the sweat and the challenge of 
he construction site. 

Recently the Air Materiel Com- 
nand of the Air Force invited a group 
>f Building Trades leaders to tour a 
ypical installment to get a firsthand 
licture of the problems and conditions 
ivolved in missile base construction, 
t Beale Air Force Base in Marysville, 

alifornia. 

Included in the party was Finlay 



C. Allan, assistant to General Presi- 
dent Maurice A. Hutcheson. For a 
full day, top brass in the AMC com- 
mand guided the unionists through 
installations and briefing sessions on 
the scope of the missile program. 

Activation of the proposed chain of 
missile sites is one of the biggest field 
production jobs ever started in this 
country. And it is one of the most 
deadly serious projects ever under- 
taken, for upon its successful com- 
pletion hinges the future security of 
the United States for years, if not 
generations, to come. 



Object of the guided tour was to 
educate union leaders as to the ur- 
gency of the missile project and the 
need for teamwork at all levels if 
success is to be achieved. 

However, organized labor long has 
been aware of the importance of the 
missile base program. At its Miami 
meeting last month, the Building and 
Construction Trades Department 
unanimously adopted a resolution set- 
ting forth strong policies for avoiding 
work stoppages on missile site bases. 
In part, that resolution said: 

Whereas, the Building and Con- 



At right is shown one of the under- 
ground passage ways in missile com- 
plex. See diagram on page 10 for 
illustration of general plan. 




PRIL, 1961 




MAJ. GEN. THOMAS P. GERRITY 

. . . commands Air Force Ballistic 
Missile Center. 



3. No State or Local Building and 
Construction Trades Council shall 
render any aid, assistance or support 
to any local union which strikes, 
pickets or engages in a work stoppage 
which violates this policy; nor shall 
any State or Local Building and Con- 
struction Trades Council recognize 
any strike, picketing or work stoppage 
which violates this policy. 

4. Each General President of the 
affiliated National and International 
Unions and the President of the De- 
partment shall notify all constituent 
local unions and local and state build- 
ing and construction trades councils of 
this missile project policy and take 
appropriate action to implement this 
policy. 



Missile bases constitute one of th 
most challenging construction project 
ever conceived. A typical installatio 
is a honeycomb of tunnels joinin 
silos, power houses, fuel storage h 
cilities, command posts, etc. Precisio 
and close tolerances are "musts" 
many units. 

Brass Greetings 

In his greeting to the visitors, Majc 
General T. P. Gerrity, overall con 
mander of the project, stressed th 
need for a teamwork approach at a 
levels. 

"It is through meetings like th 
that we hope to achieve a better ui 
derstanding of the task and our mi 
tual problem," he told the visitors. 



struction Trades Department (AFL- 
CIO) has always responded vigorously 
and wholeheartedly when a President 
of the United States has sounded the 
call of national need as is evidenced 
by the highest official commendation 
of the Department's work during 
World War II in speeding the com- 
pletion of the Clinton and Hanford 
Atomic Bomb Projects, the building 
of a great chain of naval bases at 
home and abroad, and in the comple- 
tion of the vast construction program 
of the Corps of Engineers: 

Four Points Stressed 

Now, Therefore, the President of 
the Building and Construction Trades 
Department (AFL-CIO). with the ap- 
proval of its Executive Council, an- 
nounces the following policy in con- 
nection with the national missiles pro- 
gram which is to apply to all national 
and international unions affiliated with 
the Department, their constituent local 
unions, and the various state and local 
building trades councils: 

1. All local and national procedures 
for the settlement of labor disputes 
without interruption of construction 
shall be complied with, strictly, includ- 
ing the procedures of the National 
Joint Board for the Settlement of 
Jurisdictional Disputes. 

2. No strike, picketing, or work 
stoppage shall be undertaken on any 
missile project by any local union 
without complete exhaustion of all 
available procedures and methods for 
the peaceful settlement of the dispute 
and the prior authorization of the 
General President of the National or 
International Union with which the 
local union is affiliated. 



10 




In a brief but extremely eloquent 
reply, Neil Haggerty, Building Trades 
Department president, thanked the 
Air Force for the opportunity of 
learning first-hand the problems and 
special challenges involved in the mis- 
sile base program. From knowledge 
comes understanding, and from under- 
standing comes harmony, he told the 
Air Force leaders. Therefore, briefings 
of this kind help unions meet their 
responsibilities more effectively. 

There Are Three 

Three types of missiles are involved 
in the overall program — the Atlas, 
Titan, and Minuteman. All are inter- 
continental in their potential. 

Among the Building Trades officials 



making the official inspection tour 
were, in addition to Brother Allan, the 
following: 

Among Those Present 

C. W. Sickles, general president, and 
John Hutchison, secretary-treasurer, 
International Association of Heat and 
Frost Insulators and Asbestos Work- 
ers; Russell K. Burg, vice-president, 
International Brotherhood of Boiler- 
makers, Iron Ship Builders, Black- 
smiths, Forgers and Helpers; Gordon 
M. Freeman, president, and J. M. 
Parker, assistant to the president, In- 
ternational Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers; Francis X. Hanley, assistant 
to the president, International Union 
of Operating Engineers; J. H. Lyons, 





vice president, International Associa- 
tion of Bridge, Structural and Orna- 
mental Ironworkers; Vernon Reed, 
vice president, International Hod Car- 
riers', Building and Common Laborers' 
Union; Harold Mills, secretary-treas- 
urer, Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers 
International Union; William Peitler, 
general president, International Asso- 
ciation of Marble, Slate and Stone 
Polishers, Rubbers and Sawyers. Tile 
and Marble Setters Helpers and Ter- 
razzo Helpers; Bryce Holcombe. gen- 
eral representative, Brotherhood of 
Painters, Decorators and Paperhang- 
ers: John E. Hauck, organizer, Opera- 
tive Plasterers and Cement Masons 
International Association; John Mc- 
Cartin, assistant general president, 
United Association of Journeymen and 
Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe- 
fitting Industry; John A. McConaty, 
vice president, United Slate, Tile and 
Composition Roofers, Damp and Wa- 
terproof Workers Association. 



The cutaway diagram shows under- 
ground works of a Titan missile base 
and on facing page is a key to various 
elements. 



PRIL, 1961 



11 



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12 



ml RUE I EM PER 

THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB 



THE CARPENTEJ 




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CT I ON 



LABOR-SPONSORED JOBLESS CONFERENCE 
HEARS PLEAS FOR GOVERNMENT ACTION 



Three economists at a labor-spon- 
sored conference on unemployment 
combined to attack the federal govern- 
ment's failure to give leadership in 
promoting Canada's rate of economic 
growth. 

As a result, they said, unemploy- 
ment continued its year-by-year up- 
ward spiral and unused production 
capacity was reaching alarming pro- 
portions. 

The three speakers at the parley 
called by the Ontario Federation of 
Labor were Dr. Robert Macintosh, 
supervisor of investments for the Bank 
of Nova Scotia; Harry Waisglass, 
United Steelworkers of America assist- 
ant research director; and Dr. Stefan 
Stykolt, assistant professor of political 
economy at the University of Toronto. 

Their approach to the question of 
how to create new job opportunities 
paralleled in many- ways the submis- 
sion of the Canadian Labour Congress 
to the federal cabinet in February. 

Macintosh called for a positive fed- 
eral policy of deficit financing (in 
other words, public investment) in 
times of high unemployment to ex- 
pand the economy. 

He said the deep-seated fear of 
deficit financing in Canada and the 
United States had to be combatted. In 
the minds of the general public, large 
deficits had come to mean inflation or 
high interest rates or both — and these 
fears caused a withdrawal from the 
bond market. 

Macintosh said the predicted fed- 
eral deficit of $300,000,000 in the 
current fiscal year was a modest one. 
If unemployment persisted at a level 
exceeding IVz per cent of the labor 
force, a substantially high level of 
deficit financing would be called for in 
order to give the economy a lift. 

The bank economist called for an 
expansion of social capital — public 



projects which have in large part been 
edged out of the way in periods of 
industrial expansion and would be 
pushed aside again in any new boom 
period. 

Macintosh said it was important to 
tackle the problem of translating 
deficit financing at the federal level 
into positive spending programs on 
social projects — schools, hospitals, 
roads — at the provincial-municipal 
level. 

The Steelworkers' Harry Waisglass 
placed a major share of the responsi- 
bility for the current slowdown in the 
country's growth on a decline in the 
per capita spending by all levels of 
government on real goods and serv- 
ices. These expenditures in 1960 were 
10 per cent below the 1956 level and 
13 per cent below that of 1952. 

"Measured in terms of our growing 
number of unemployed, our unused 
production capacities are reaching 
alarming proportions and will prob- 
ably become much worse. . . ." Wais- 
glass warned. 

Citing the industrial employment in- 
dex, Waisglass suggested the country 
had hit a new recession before fully 
recovering from the previous one. For 
the first time since 1945, a recession 
in employment had not been followed 
by establishment of a new employ- 
ment record in the subsequent re- 
covery period. 

Waisglass urged Ottawa take the 
lead in policies of expansion financed 
by increased government borrowing 
rather than by higher taxation. This 
increased borrowing should be accom- 
plished by an expansion of the money 
supply without restricting credit sup- 
plies available to meet the demands of 
private borrowers. 

The resulting higher levels of 
employment and income, Waisglass 
maintains, would produce increased 



government revenues and eventually 
wipe out the deficit. 

David Archer, president of the 
500,000-member Ontario Federation 
of Labor, reminded an OFL-sponsored 
conference on jobs that unemploy- 
ment is everybody's business. 

"We cannot continue to live in an 
economy half slave and half free." 

The two-day conference called to 
examine all facets of the unemploy- 
ment problem was considered the first 
in Canada sponsored by a labor fed- 
eration to bring together management 
and union representatives, churchmen, 
social workers and members of the 
Legislature. 

Douglas Hamilton, OFL secretary- 
treasurer, and a member of the 
Carpenters Union, said the federal 
government could not shed its re- 
sponsibility for creating new job op- 
portunities. 

He cited statements by Labour Mini- 
ster Michael Starr and Trade Minister 
George Hees calling on labor and 
management to assume the burden. 

The OFL secretary-treasurer invited 
the federal government to call a con- 
ference of all parties concerned in an 
effort to stimulate employment. 

"If the government will bring for- 
ward specific instances of projects we 
can undertake, labor will give them 
very serious consideration," Hamilton 
declared. "We are prepared to sit 
down with management, government 
or anyone else to study this problem." 

Miss Lillian Thomson, executive 
director of Toronto's Neighborhood 
Workers Association, told the confer- 
ence that Canadians tended to ignore 
poverty on their own streets. 

They often sloughed off unemploy- 
ment by saying the jobless didn't want 
to work. 

"Sometimes lately, I've wondered 
if I was away back in the 1930's. . . . 



APRIL, 1961 



13 



Do you remember the bread lines in 
the 1930's, and then the war came 
and the men who weren't supposed to 
want to work rushed to their uniforms 
and their overalls." 

Miss Thomson warned that welfare 
agencies such as her own — the largest 
non-sectarian welfare agency in Can- 
ada — couldn't help half of the jobless 
who needed funds and they couldn't 
help anybody effectively. 

Victims of unemployment, she said, 
were demoralized by being shunted 
from Unemployment Insurance Com- 
mission offices to those of relief de- 
partments and welfare agencies. 

Unemployment left ill health and 
wrecked homes in its wake, she re- 
minded the parley. High rents 
siphoned off much of the available 
welfare funds and slashed into the 
food budgets of the jobless. 

It had often been said that Canada 
needed a more integrated system of 
social security — "needed it for the 
sake of efficiency. But I'm saying we 
need it for the sake of human self- 
respect." 

Miss Thomson said there was no 
one naive enough to believe that the 
evil of poverty with its sickness, 
broken homes, delinquency and ver- 
min could be overcome by raising 
welfare rates indefinitely. 



In addition to welfare, new job op- 
portunities, retraining of the jobless, 
training of the unskilled and decent 
housing were essential. 

Beyond this, Miss Thomson empha- 
sized, governments should be moti- 
vated by a sense of urgency about 
poverty — not a reluctant concern. 

New Contracts in '61 

Here is the 1961 collective bargain- 
ing picture as described in the De- 
cember issue of the Labor Depart- 
ment's Monthly Labor Review: 

There are nearly 6,000,000 organ- 
ized workers by 343 contracts involv- 
ing 5,000 or more workers. Of these 
agreements, 291 call for negotiations 
in one or more areas ranging from 
wage reopening only to wage reopen- 
ing, escalator clause and deferred in- 
crease. 

Biggest group involved is the Auto- 
mobile Workers, which will be ne- 
gotiating for more than 600,000 
workers of whom 340,000 are em- 
ployed by General Motors. Contracts 
and expiration dates are as follows: 
American Motors, August 3 1 ; Budd 
Co., September 30; Chrysler Corp., 
July 31; Ford Motor Co., July 31; 
General Motors, July 31, and Stude- 
baker-Packard, October 31. 



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14 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMORIAM 



L. U. NO. 4, DAVENPORT, IOWA 
Groman, Gustav 

L. U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Kretzmer, Richard 
Olsen, Joseph R. 

L. U. NO. 22, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Abreu, Joaquin Silva 
Bell, E. 

Busenbark, L. J. 
Byrne, William 
Carlen, Isaac 
Carlsen, K. 
Edell, William 
Ewing, W. H. 
Gilliaum, John C. 
Gowans, William 
Gregory, R. H. 
Hart, John 
Henning, W. C. 
Klink, A. F. 
Kurki, Emil 
Lathlean, J. T. 
Liebert, E. W. 
Lindner, John 
Lowrey, Lee 
Mattson, Alexander 
Meyers, George C. 
Moriarty, Eugene 
Moughler, Roy R. 
Mydland, Thor 
Person E. S. 
Schioldager, W. E. 
Schoolcraft, Daniel 
Sterling, Fred 
Ulrich, Fred 
Van Wey, J. E. 
Windfeldt, W. P. 
Woods, Joseph I. 

L. U. NO. 42, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Edwards, A. W. 
Holt. Chester 
McMillan, John J. 
Paul Navarret 

L. U. NO. 44, CHAMPAIGN URBANA, ILL. 
Roe, W. B. 

L. U. NO. 50, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Wreyford, Burton O. 

L. U. NO. 72, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Pontius, Leroy 
Rampe, August 
Roelse, John 
Stout, Edward 

L. U. NO. 74, CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 
High, W. C. 
Johnson, James P. 
Sullivan, P. H. 
Varnell, E. D. 
Zelinsky, E. F. 

L. U. NO. 79, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Desiderio. Antonio 
Sammis, Jsaac 

L. U. NO. 83, HALIFAX, N. S. 
Arsenault, John 
Fredricks, Walter 
McPhee, Russel 

L. U. NO. 90, EVANSVILLE, IND. 
Hollars, Chester 
VanHoosier William 

L. U. NO. 93, OTTAWA, ONT. 
Charbonneau, Louis 
Marrinier, Joseph 
Tremblay, Henry 
Urgelewich, Leon 



L. U. NO. 96, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Boucher, Felix 
Huard, Joseph 
Joubert, Henry 

L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MD. 
Cox, Isaac N. Sr. 
Hopf, Ferdinand G. 
Johnson, William R. Sr. 
Raynes, Luther D. 

L. U. NO. 115, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
Hiza, Paul 
Sirois, Arthur 

L. U. NO. 132, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Reum, R. L. 
Wildman, J. W. 

L. U. NO. 198, DALLAS, TEXAS 
Bartley, Paris R. 
Bayer, Frank 
Denbow, W. C. 
Harsh, Russell K. 
McFadden, H. K. 
Sharrock, J. L. 
Steele, W. G. 
Walker, Ed 

L. U. NO. 200, COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Walker, Lester 

L. U. NO. 213, HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Humphreys, I. D. 

L. U. NO. 242, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Achterberch, William 
Gaffney, Peter 
Wheatley, Vergne 
Zenner, Charles 

L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Falik, Oscar 
Franze, Edward 
Friedland, Louis 

L. U. NO. 257, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Alpinieri, Salvatore 
Korpela, William 

L. U. NO. 264, MILWAUKEE, WISC. 
Beckman, Herbert 
Evenson, Mose 
Guse, Otto 

Stein, August 

L. U. NO. 298, LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

Williams. William 

L. U. NO. 337, DETROIT, MICH. 
Bucht, Mattias F. 
Goss, Charles 
Rybor, John 
Upson, James 

L U. NO. 345, MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Cooley, S. B. 
Lomax. Robert E. 

L. U. NO. 349. ORANGE, N. J. 
Conrad, Arthur 
Sullivan, John 

L. U. NO. 350, NEW R0CHELLE, N. Y. 
Brehart, Ernest 

L. U. NO. 355, BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Begier, Frank H. 
Lux, Nicholas 

L. U. NO. 366, BRONX, N. Y. 
Bergin, Michael A. 
Samele, Joseph 

L U. NO. 472, ASHLAND, KY. 
Kazee, Harmon 



L. U. NO. 483, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Beutler, George J. 

Hove, Carl 

Wilson, John A. 
L. U. NO. 494, WINDSOR, ONT. 

Barg, Ernest 

L. U. NO. 531, ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 
Coulton, William E. R. 
Hernikl, Herman 

L. U. NO. 545, KANE, PA. 
Granbom, Alfred 

L. U. NO. 583, PORTLAND, ORE. 
Bartels, Henry H. 

L. U. NO. 625, MANCHESTER, N. H. 

Chouinard, Joseph-Victor 
Clifford, Ray Lawrence 
Desrochers, Joseph 
Francoeur, Georges-J. 
Poehlman, Frank F. 

L. U. NO. 627, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Beaver, V. E. 
Brown. F. L. 
Geoghagan, C. R. 
Kivi, Hans 
Nelson, Andrew 

L. U. NO. 740, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Kisher, F. 
Mahon, James 

L. U. NO. 787, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Gersten, Harold 
Larson, Gunnar 
Lervig, Andrew 
Melhus, Sigvald 
Nelson, Charles 
Robertsen, Sciono 
Salaas, Sigurd 
Samuelsen, Sam 

L. U. NO. 791, BROOKLYN, N.Y. 
Heil, Herman 
Lindmark, Ernest 
Naja, John 
Nilsen, Edwin 
Opperisano, John 
Quigley. Daniel Jr. 
Raymond. Edgar 
Saulnier, George 

L. U. NO. 844, RESEDA, CAL. 
Adams, George T. 
Bergquist, Lawrence 
Holder, Henry 

L. U. NO. 925, SALINAS, CAL. 
Kemp, Everett V. 

L. U. NO. 974, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Vrany, Charles 

L. U. NO. 978, SPRINGFIELD, MO. 
White. John R. 

L. U. NO. 993, MIAMI, FLA. 
Leffingwell. E. O. 

L. U. NO. 1029, JOHNSTON CITY, ILL. 
Jackson. Robert 

L. U. NO. 1354, OGDENSBURG, N. Y. 
Denny. Fred 
Frick, Gerald 
Sovie. James 

L. U. NO. 1358, LA JOLLA, CAL. 
Fields, Paul 
Lee, C.P. 

Milchoir, Jacob 

L. U. NO. 1367, CHICAGO, ILL. 
Moe. Arnold 



L U. NO. 1394, FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 
Forehand, Hosea 
Poyer, Frederick 

L. U. NO. 1407, WILMINGTON, CAL. 
Ponce, Javier 

L. U. NO. 1423, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS 
Waggoner, A. P. 

L. U. NO. 1478, REDONDO BEACH, CAL. 
Darnell, James A. 
Gonzales, Lorenzo S. 
Grondin, Leon A. 
Powell, William 
Pratt, Walter C. 
Radcliffe, John K. 
Run, Troy P. 
Salmon, Horace E. 
Thomas, Andrew C. 
Wells, Joseph 

L. U. NO. 1492, HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 
Maxwell, Carl C. 

L. U. NO. 1513, DETROIT, MICH. 
Greenberg, Isidore 

L. U. NO. 1615, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
Cosgrove, Hugh 

L. U. NO. 1665, ALEXANDRIA, VA. 
Boyd, Otis L. 
Hoffman, Irvin 
Messick, Ray 
Shimett, Elmer O. 

L. U. NO. 1683, EL DORADO, ARK. 
Mattox, Thomas J. 

L. U. NO. 1693, CHICAGO, ILL. 
Rader, Lester D. 

L. U. NO. 1846, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Haase, George R. 

L. U. NO. 1938, CROWN POINT, IND. 
Anderson, Oscar 

L. U. NO. 1984, MAGNA, UTAH 
Pearson, Axel E. 
Smith, George L. 
Walters, Oscar N. 

L. U. NO. 2046, MARTINEZ, CAL. 
Darone, Tony 
Jennings, Ira 
Ramsour. Everett 
Smith, Rod 

L. U. NO. 2067, MEDFORO, ORE. 
Fraser, John Alexander 

L. U. NO. 2071, BELLINGHAM, WASH. 
Kersulec, Adolph 

L. U. NO. 2080, GREENVILLE, MISS. 

Myles. Charlie 

L. U. NO. 2164, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Windahl, Gunnar H. 

L. U. NO. 2230, GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Bishop, Ashley 

L. U. NO. 2274, PITTSBURGH, PA. 
DeLuca. Anthony 
Paulick, Gene H. 

L. U. NO. 2313, MERIDIAN, MISS. 
Morgan, Thomas W. 

L. U. NO. 2340, BRADENTON, FLA. 
Carter. Trever 

L. U. NO. 2435, INGLEW00D, CAL. 
Juge, Jules A. 

L. U. NO. 2902, BURNS, ORE. 
Shores, E. M. 



APRIL, 1961 



IS 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



general treasurer 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
1 1 1 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield. New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 

3615 Chester Ave.. Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District. Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



TO ALL FINANCIAL SECRETARIES — 

DEATH AND DISABILITY CLAIMS 



It is the desire of the General Office to process and 
properly dispose of all applications for funeral or 
disability donations as expeditiously as possible. Fi- 
nancial Secretaries can greatly assist us in that en- 
deavor by seeing that each claim is completely and 
properly filled out and promptly mailed directly to 
the GENERAL TREASURER, along with the re- 
quired supporting papers. 

As the funeral donation on the death of a member 
is payable to the decedent's estate, or to the person 
presenting proof that he or she has paid the funeral 
expenses, with each such claim we must have either 
Letters of Administration or the funeral bill, indicat- 
ing who the responsible person is. 



This is not required in a claim for funeral donation 
on the death of a member's wife or husband. In such 
claims the member should always be named as 'Ap- 
plicant" for the donation, unless the member for 
some reason is incompetent and unable to take care 
of his or her own affairs. In that event we should have 
Power of Attorney or Guardianship papers. 

If there are any unusual circumstances in connec- 
tion with any claim, a full explanation should be 
forwarded with the application for funeral donation. 
By so doing you may eliminate much unnecessary 
correspondence and delay in the proper adjustment 
of the claim. 



NOTICE TO RECORDING SECRETARIES 



The Quarterly Circular for the months April, May 
and June, 1961, containing the quarterly password, 
has been forwarded to all Local Unions of the United 



Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify the General Secretary, 
Carpenters Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



If some of the observations we have 
to make here threaten the founda- 
tions of your happy home, you must 
blame Mrs. Herbert L. Kay, the wife 
of one of our members in Houston, 
Texas. It was her interesting letter 
that set us to thinking about the equal 
responsibility of husband and wife to 
keep the budget balanced — and if you 
can't get a rise out of your husband 
on this, you're just not trying. 

Mrs. Kay begins, "I was very much 
interested in the article written in the 
January edition of "The Carpenter" 
in the 'Ammunition for the Budget 
Battle' column. There sure were some 
good ideas on how to shop for less 
expensive cuts of meat and other 
items with the same food value as 
more expensive foods." (Thanks for 
the kind words.) She continues, "But 
the thing I'm more interested in is a 
Budget Plan, showing what percent of 
income should go for Food, Clothing, 
Rent, Transportation, Miscellaneous, 
etc." She feels that it is not being fair 
to rigidly budget the housewife on her 
food purchases while, at the same 
time, other family expenditures are so 
flexible that there always seems to be 
that little extra available when wanted. 
For example, if hubby find a surplus 
in the Entertainment kitty, it just dis- 
appears, while the little woman has 
to account for every cent. 

"A man could put a car he bought 
new in a garage after about two years 
and have it completely overhauled a 
lot cheaper than trading for a new 
one and paying $1,600 to $1,800 dif- 
ference every two years. . . . He could 
have a nice place fixed up to store 
tiis tools cheaper than constantly re- 
placing rusted ones. He could wear 
:lean, patched work clothes while 
working in grease and tar just as easily 
is his wife makes over hand-me-downs 
for her use to save on clothing. And 
tiow about these hair oils and shaving 
supplies he adds to the grocery bills? 
[ wash my face with soap and water 
ind there are never any extra pennies 
allowed for hand cream. ... A smok- 
ing man could also try some roll it 
yourself tobacco or dip snuff instead 
af paying for expensive cigarettes 
(and boy, how that would cut down 



on my grocery bills!). Vitamins 
would be a lot cheaper and save on 
medical expenses." 

Mrs. Kay concludes her spirited 
case with "Let's see where most of 
today's income is really going. I keep 
books in my house and I know!" 

First, of all, let me say that I 
heartily agree with Mrs. Kay that in 
many cases the burdens of budget 
balancing are unjustly distributed. The 
lady of the house skrimps and plans 
to save pennies on the food shopping, 
freezes during the day to hold down 
the heat bills, makes do with a hat 
she's embarrassed to be seen in, only 
to see friend husband sink a couple of 
hundred dollars in a hi-fi or a hobby. 
Now hi-fi's and hobbies are undeniably 
nice to have, provided that an equal 
amount is set aside for something that 
she would like to splurge on. 



That being said, let's look into the 
problem of arriving at a "typical 
budget". Mrs. Kay, there is just no 
such animal. For years, the Federal 
Departments of Agriculture, Com- 
merce and Labor through their con- 
sumer service bureaus have wrestled 
with this challenge in vain. 

The problems involved in arriving 
at such figures or even at percentages 
are two-fold. First, the over-all cost 
of living differs widely, depending on 
locality. In its most recent survey on 
living costs, the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics used Minneapolis as typical 
in both living costs and income. Then 
they rated other cities as above or 
below this norm. Incidentally, Mrs. 
Kay's Houston was placed in the en- 
viable position of having the lowest 
living costs of all the cities rated and 
at the same time enjoying compara- 



FAMILY LIVING COSTS COMPARED 
TO AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS* 

City Workers' Family Budget Average Weekly 

Weekly Relative to Weekly Earnings 

City Cost Minneapolis f Earnings Relative to 

Minneapolis t 

Houston, Tex $103.27 86.9 $100.60 103.2 

Atlanta 108.50 91.3 83.82 86.0 

Scranton, Pa 109.48 92.1 68.25 70.0 

Baltimore 109.96 92.5 89.60 92.0 

Philadelphia 113.42 95.4 92.57 95.0 

Kansas City, Mo 114.69 96.4 95.92 98.4 

New York City 114.81 96.6 81.80 83.9 

Detroit 116.77 98.2 118.24 121.3 

Cincinnati 117.31 98.7 97.83 100.4 

Washington, D. C 118.21 99.4 95.12 97.6 

Minneapolis 118.87 100.0 97.44 100.0 

Cleveland 1 19.21 100.3 105.48 108.3 

Pittsburgh 119.21 100.3 102.70 105.4 

Portland, Ore 1 19.65 100.7 95.07 97.6 

St. Louis 120.50 101.4 96.26 98.8 

Los Angeles 120.87 101.7 101.30 104.0 

San Francisco 121.23 102.0 104.66 107.4 

Boston 121.48 102.2 86.41 88.7 

Seattle 126.19 106.2 98.92 101.5 

Chicago 126.29 106.2 lOUOt 104.0 

* Costs of a modest but adequate budget for a family of four: earnings are 
average weekly earnings of production workers in manufacturing, both as of 
October 1959. 

t Minneapolis equals 100. 

t Estimated from earnings for Illinois. 



^PRIL, 1961 



17 



tively high relative income. We 
reproduce this chart with this article. 

The second factor to be considered 
in establishing a typical budget is the 
taste and desires of the individual. For 
example, A and B may have the same 
income but A wouldn't be caught 
dead living in the apartment that B 
finds perfectly satisfactory. B, on the 
other hand, has a taste or a figure type 
that calls for somewhat better quality 
clothing than A is satisfied with. Or 
there may be dietary problems or 
health factors to be considered. Or A 
may prefer to make sacrifices in the 
clothes budget to afford piano or 
dancing lessons for the children. Or 
B may feel the need to do more 
charity than A and sacrifices part of 
the sum usually for entertainment. 

Now, all this having been said, 
there are still some stable items for 
which we can establish standards. 
Always taking into account regional 
price differences, the Department of 
Agriculture has set up the chart we 
reproduce here to show the estimated 
cost of one week's food, first by 
families and then by individuals. As 
you can see, it offers three different 
food plans, the low-cost, the moderate 
and the liberal — depending, of course, 
on one's income and personal tastes. 
Quantities for children were estab- 
lished to comply with the National 
Research Council's Recommended 
Dietary Allowances. These estimates 
are possible for food, in contrast to 
other items of expense, simply be- 
cause all human bodies, rich and poor, 
require certain basic foods for good 
nutrition and cost can be estimated. 

In regard to some of the specific 
complaints that Mrs. Kay has made, 
we'll simply offer these observations 
for what they are worth. 1 ) Cigarettes 
cost approximately 25<S a pack; for a 
roll-it-yourself the amount drops to 
about 94- 2) The price of proprie- 
taries (aspirin, non-drug items such 
as cosmetic, grooming aids, digestive 
aids) is always much higher in food 
stores. Cut-rate drug stores with 
private brands can save $$$$$ each 
week from your budget. And, in- 
cidentally, why should the little 
woman's carefully planned food 
budget have to carry such items as 
these? Except for such as tooth 
paste, medicines, toilet and facial tis- 
sues, each adult should be responsible 
for his or her own cigarettes, cos- 
metics or grooming needs. 

In the final analysis, Mrs. Kay, the 
correct budget for any family or in- 
dividual is a highly personal thing. It 
is something that each unit must 
establish through mutual discussion 



and agreement. And it is something 
that all the members of the group 
must respect and try to adhere to. It 
is certainly not fair that one partner 
should do all the saving and another 
all the spending, I'm sure any fair- 



minded person would agree. If any 
of you kind readers do not or have 
any pithy comments to make on this 
sensitive question, we'd like to hear 
from you and perhaps to air your 
views in this column. 



ESTIMATED COST OF 


ONE WEEK'S FOOD 




Sex-age groups 
FAMILIES 


Low-cost 

plan 
Dollars 


Moderate- 
cost plan 
Dollars 


Liberal 

plan 
Dollars 


Family of four, preschool children 


13.80 

12.40 

20.60 

. .. 23.80 


19.00 
17.00 
27.70 
32.30 


21.30 
19.00 
31.40 
36.60 


INDIVIDUALS 








Children: 








1-3 years 

4-6 years 


3.10 

3.70 
4.40 


3.90 

4.70 
5.70 
6.80 
8.20 
8.70 
8.70 
9.60 
11.20 


4.20 
5.30 
6.70 
7.80 
9.40 
9.90 
9.90 
10.90 
12.60 


7-9 years 


5.20 


Boys, 13-15 years 

16-19 years 


6.10 
6.40 
6.50 
6.90 
8.20 


Women: 








55-74 years 

75 years and over 


5.40 
5.30 
5.00 
4.80 


7.60 
7.30 
6.90 
6.50 
8.90 
10.90 


8.50 
8.30 
7.80 
7.30 
9.80 
12.10 




6.80 
8.50 


Men: 








20-34 years 

35-54 years 

55-74 years 

75 years and over 


7.10 
6.60 
6.30 
6.10 


9.70 
9.10 
8.60 
8.20 


10.90 

10.10 

9.50 

9.10 



Preparing for Convention 




The Executive Board of the Ladies 
Auxiliary, Carpenters State Council 
of Indiana, are busy these days mak- 
ing plans for the state convention to 
be held in May. The five ladies are 
shown meeting in Marion, the conven- 
tion site, to discuss details and final 
plans. They are, seated left to right: 



Maxine Barkley, 1st vice-president, Ft. 
Wayne; and Arab Johnson, president, 
Muncie. Standing left to right are 
Rita Stogdell, 2nd vice-president, Ko- 
komo; Bette Smith, recording secre- 
tary, Jonesboro, and Marilyn Runkle, 
financial secretary-treasurer, Lafayette. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




of Local 1281 out of Anchorage, it 
is still a little wild and wooly there- 
abouts. 



"Ironhead" Fisherman 

Fishing fun never stops for E. A. 
'aimer of McCleary, Washington, a 
nember of Local 2761. 

In the northwest, he's known as an 
ironhead fisherman," otherwise 
:nown as a "steelheader." an all-year 
ound angler who pursues the giant 
ea-run rainbow, a trout that leaves 
he freshwater stream of its birth, lives 
n the ocean for a couple of years like 
he salmon and returns as a lunker to 
hat same freshwater stream to spawn 
nd perpetuate the race. 

Here's a photo of E. A., returning 
rom a successful steelhead trip. In 
he left arm is a 5 ! i -pound sea-going 
ainbow and in the right fist, a 23- 
lounder! 




Last we heard, E. A. was in first 
ilace in the Simpson Steelhead Derby 
vith that 23-pounder, but he wasn't 
:ounting on this netting him top rung, 
cause the trout grow mighty tall in 
lis stretch o' the river. 

Both steelies were caught in the 
rhehalis river in December and both 
vere duped with a bright red cherry 
Jobber lure. 



Plan Now — Enjoy Later 

Reg W. Dick of Napanee, Ontario, 
a member of Local 572, says now's 
the time o' year to start thinking about 






A^-J*. 



if' 



what you're going to do for your sum- 
mer vacation. It helps ease the "wait- 
ing pains" the winter long. 

Reg and his family plan to spend 
two weeks at White lake in Ontario. 
They'll rent a cabin thereabouts and 
fish from morn 'til twilight. 

He sends in the following photo of 
himself and son, Reg Jr., a page from 
last summer's memory book. Reg tells 
us the lake provides good fishing for 
pike, black bass, sunfish and the odd 
eel. 

Thanks for the tip, Reg, and I'm 
sure the pic of you and the youngster 
will also help our readerfolk with 
those piscatorial waiting pains. 

Confused — Not Lost 

The frightening experience of being 
lost in the woods is one that cannot 
be minimized. That is except by one 
of our pioneer greats: Daniel Boone. 
When asked if he had ever been lost 
in the woods, Dan'l replied: "No, but 
I've been confused for two or three 
days." 

Nailed a Grizzly 

According to a note from Bill 
Schmidt of Valdez, Alaska, a member 




Bill and the Missus nailed a 600- 
pound grizzly bear and her two-year- 
old cub at Robe lake, just three miles 
from their homestead at Valdez. 

They saw five of them last summer 
but backed off as they were only 
carrying shotguns. The bear colony 
were doing a little fishing at a stream 
which runs near their home. 

Here's a pic of hunters Mr. and 
Mrs. Schmidt with the two grizzlies 
they downed. Bill nailed a caribou in 
sub-zero temperatures with a 32 Win- 
chester out of Paxton, about 1 1 miles 
from the Richardson Highway. 

Turtles have no teeth. They 
"crunch" and "cut" with powerful jaw 
muscles and razor sharp jaw bones. 

Gets a 160-Pound Buck 

A 160-pound buck (field dressed) 
with a rocking chair rack fell to the 
300 Savage rifle of Val Luczynski of 




Muskegon, Wisconsin, a member of 
Local 1573 in West Allis, Wisconsin. 

It was downed in Rusk county in 
Northern Wisconsin. A lung shot at 
100 yards did the trick. 



VPRIL, 1961 



19 




Slotted Lag Screw 

Slotting a lag screw with a hacksaw 
to allow tightening it with a screw- 
driver or brace will prove convenient 
in many instances when the fastening 
required is out of reach for use of an 
ordinary wrench. Deep countersunk 
holes, lack of a suitable socket 
wrench, and otherwise inaccessible 




USE HACKSAW TO 
CUT THE SLOT 



fastening can be accomplished easily 
by using this device. Detaching is 
made into a simpler procedure, es- 
pecially where ordinary wood screws 
would prove to have insufficient hold- 
ing power to be used. 



THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and 
published. Send along your pet trick 
for making a job easier. It can earn 
you five dollars and the gratitude of 
your fellow members. Include a rough 
sketch from which we can make a 
drawing. When the same idea is sub- 
mitted by more than one reader, the 
letter bearing the earliest postmark 
will be awarded the check. 

Another Use of the 
Combination Square 

To get fast measurements for 2x4 
width and thickness, where this is 
needed in laying out for window open- 
ings and partitions, take a hacksaw or 
three-cornered file and notch the 90- 
degree angle on square, measuring 
from back edge of blade. First notch 



Michael Ligocki 
3808 West 41st Ave. 
Gary, Indiana 



Accuracy in Layout 

For extreme accuracy in laying out 
16" on center, paint marks on tape 
at l'-4", 2-8", 4-0" and so on. Start 
layout 15V4" from edge or corner, 





1%", then 3Ve". I find this faster 
than measuring with a rule or block 
of 2 x 4 since the square is usually 
carried in the hip pocket and is always 
handy. 

George Smith 

2404 Illinois Ave. 

Granite City, 111. 

(L.U. 633) 



;v - Avoid Tools Rusting in Toolbox 



drive nail, hook on tape and layout 
16" O.C. using small square. It is 
foolproof against gaining or losing 
inches in layout. 

Arnold B. Elkins 
(L.U. 2203) 
127 N. Dahlia Dr. 
Anaheim, Cal. 



20 



I would like to submit a trick to 
keep tools from rusting in winter time. 
Place a piece of camphor ice in tool- 
box. I found it very useful. 

Robert D. Gray 
(L.U. 183) 
1821 W. Martin St. 
Peoria, 111. 



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CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
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THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p., 498 il., 
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BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 il., covering 
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ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il., covering 
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QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
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With 2 books, THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00. 
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NOTICE. — Carrying charges paid only when full 
remittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to 
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— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



Accurate, Easy 
LEVELING 




for FLOORS 
..FOOTINGS 



The old reliable water level is now modernized 
into an accurate low-cost layout level. 50 ft. clear 
tough vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in 
each set-up, and more if necessary. With its 
special container-reservoir, only 7" dia. x 4", the 
LEVELEASY remains filled and ready for fast 
one-man leveling. Compact and durable, this 
amazing level is packed with complete illustrated 
instructions on modern liquid leveling. 

Stop wasting time and money on makeshift 
methods. Thousands of carpen- 
ters and builders everywhere 
have found the LEVELEASY sim- 
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just as accurate. It pays its way. 

If your tool dealer has not yet stocked Leveleasy, 
use our quick mail service. Send your check or 
money order for only $7.95 today by airmail and 
have your level on the way tomorrow. Money 
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Please rush ( ) Leveleasy(s) 

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□ Purchase order attached 

□ FREE LITERATURE 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto Ave., Ocean Springs, Mississippi 
FIRST IN LIQUID LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 JJ 





New Etching Kit 

A Brotherhood member has de- 
veloped a new kit for etching your 
name and address on your tools. It 
is no more difficult to personalize your 
tools than it is to use a rubber stamp 
for signing your name to a letter. The 



F 



MV5HIHQJ.OH' D" C 
101 HYIM aittCCi. 

iohm a- doe 



] 



JOHN O. DOC 
lOI MAIN STREET 
WASHINGTON. D. C, 

job can be done quickly and perman- 
ently in a minute's time. No need to 
scratch or burn your initials on your 
tools any more. For further informa- 
tion, write to U-Etch-It Tool Co., 
P. O. Box 253, Silver Spring, Md. 

Plywood Clip 

Timber Engineering Co. has an- 
nounced that a new type of supporting 
clip for plywood decking is now avail- 
able. Called TECO H-Clip, the prod- 
uct is available for %", Vz" , 5 /a" and 
3 A " plywood thicknesses. 




Manufactured from 1 8 gauge gal- 
vanized sheet steel, TECO-H-Clips are 
designed to provide a tight, snug fit, 
thus lessening any possibility of clips 



falling off during installation. A spe- 
cial feature of the H-Clip design is a 
"leveling arm" which adjoins twin sup- 
porting tongues projecting from the 
center of the clip. This "arm" insures 
easy installation of clip regardless of 
any variations that may exist in ply- 
wood thicknesses. Implementing in- 
stallation further, edges of the H-Clip 
are smooth and rounded so that there 
is no possibility of their snagging on 
the plywood. 

TECO says that the H-Clips are 
laboratory tested and meet the FHA 
minimum property requirements as 
substitutes for solid blocking. 

For further information write to 
Timber Engineering Co., 1319 18th 
St. NW, Washington, D. C. 

This Is For The Birds 

Jo-Moco Flue-Kap is a guard to 
fit on chimney tile liners to protect 
the home from damaging rain, snow. 




birds and squirrels. It is fabricated 
of heavy galvanized metal with 
diamond mesh arrester siding. The 
manufacturer claims fires caused by 
flue-clogging tree foliage and bird 
nests are eliminated, as well as odors 
from unsanitary debris which can as 
accumulate in unprotected openings. 
It is easy to install by tightening set- 
screws against outside of chimney 
tile liner. Flue-Kap for 13" x 13" is 
$14.95: for 13" x 18". SI5.95. For 
further information write to Jo-Moco 
Products. 1102 E. Second St., Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 



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APRIL, 1961 



21 



Federal Government Makes Financial 
Disclosures Compulsory 



An Act of the Federal Government 
makes it compulsory for unions to file 
detailed reports with the government 
once a year. If they don't, the unions' 
officers may be sent to jail. 

The bill applies to international 
unions only. National unions such as 
the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers and 
the big public employes' unions are 
exempt. 

The Corporation and Labor Statis- 
tics Act also is aimed at U.S. con- 
trolled corporations and branches in 
Canada. Here too Canadian-owned 
companies are exempt from the bill's 
provisions. 

International unions operating in 
Canada will be required to file a copy 
of their constitution, annual financial 
statements, the amount received in 
dues, payments to Canadian union 
officers and employes and other 
financial information. 

The bill also requires information 
on the name, address and nationality 
of all union officers in Canada and the 



manner in which they were elected, 
the name of every union or branch 
under trusteeship and the explanation 
for the arrangement, and the name 
of every employer with which the 
union has a collective agreement. 

For the first time in federal labor 
law, unions are made liable to fine and 
punishment. "For the purpose of any 
. . . prosecution under this act a union 
shall be deemed to be a person," the 
bill reads. 

For each day beyond the filing 
deadline that a union fails to comply, 
it can be fined $50. 

"Where a union is guilty of an 
offense under this section, every offi- 
cer, member of the executive board 
or agent of the union who directed, 
authorized, assented to, acquiesced in 
or participated in the offense is a party 
to and guilty of the offense." Union 
officers can be sent to jail for three 
months and can be fined at the rate of 
$50 a day for failure to file the proper 
information. 



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22 



THE CARPENTER 



Too Bad, Too 

If there is one outfit in the world 
that can truthfully say it is living off 
the fat of the land, the honor goes to 
the makers of Metrecal. Metrecal, 
the reducing cocktail in a can, has 
swept the nation like nothing since 
the hula hoop. 

However, we can truthfully report 
that despite the existence of an almost 
unlimited market, there is absolutely 
no truth in the rumor that the Metre- 
cal people are going to start making 
an inhaler for fatheads. 



// Pays To Advertise 

When a guy named Carr recently 
went into the used plumbing supply 
business he had a "natural" for a sign 
over his place of business. It reads: 

"Honest Carr, the Used John 
Dealer." 

Logical Conclusion 

This is an age of specialization. As 
evidence we submit the case of the 
little girl who recently paid her first 
visit to a farm. Everything fascinated 
her. But her enthusiasm knew no 
bounds when she spotted a little colt. 

"Look, Mama," she exclaimed, "a 
foreign horse." 



Blind Leading The Blind 

The opponents of a decent medical 
aid bill for senior citizens are advanc- 
ing some mighty, complicated argu- 
ments to back up their position. The 
way we interpret their ideas, they are 
all for medical aid for retirees pro- 
vided they don't need it, and if they 
do need it they can pay for it them- 
selves. 

Sort of brings to mind the father 
out walking with his son. 

"Dad," asked the boy, "how does 
electricity travel through wires?" 

"Darned if I know, son," replied 
the dad. "Never did know much 
about electricity." 

"Well, what makes thunder and 
lightning?" continued the son. 

"Can't rightly say. Weather's out 
of my line too." 

The son was silent for awhile. Then 
he started again. "Dad, what makes 
. . . oh, never mind." 

"No, no, son," admonished the 
father. "Ask questions; ask lots of 
them. How else are you going to 
learn?" 



GOSS1 




Sad But True 

After recovering from his birthday 
celebration which started February 10, 
Joe Paup, the Winston Churchill of 
Skidrow, last week gave the world the 
following observation on birthdays. 

"The older we get," said Joe, "the 
easier it is to resist temptation and the 
harder it is to find." 

Proof Positive 

"The recession is bringing people 
closer together," says a columnist in a 
New York paper. 



We find it to be absolutely true — 
especially in elevators, buses and on 
the highways. 

* * * 
Positively No Rose 

A financial paper opines that calling 
the present business setback a reces- 
sion is erroneous. It is only a "settling 
out," says the paper. 

The five and a half million unem- 
ployed have another word for it — the 
same word that Sherman applied to 
war. 

Quibbling over what to call the set- 
back is silly. Whatever you call it, it 
is a pain in the neck that needs to be 
cured promptly. 

About all we can think of in this 
connection is the story of the meek 
little man who was visiting the zoo. 
In one cage he spotted a particularly 
rare species of dwarf African deer. 

"For Heaven's sake, what is that?" 
he asked an attendant. 

"What does your wife call you in 
the morning?" countered the zoo em- 
ploye. 

"Don't tell me that thin-legged little 
thing is a skunk?" the visitor gasped. 



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APRIL, 1961 



23 



fs Become Big Events 




While it seldom makes the sports 
pages, the apprenticeship contest 
rapidly is becoming a competitive 
event of considerable interest. A few 
years ago, only an occasional local 
union or council was interested in 
staging a competition where young 
men could pit their knowledge and 
skill, acquired through three to four 
years of apprenticeship training, 
against each other. 

Today, there are a number of ap- 
prenticeship competitions which have 
become annual events. Probably the 
best known of all such competitions is 
the Western States Apprenticeship 
Contest. In this contest the winners 
from eight to eleven state competitions 
vie with each other for the multistate 
title. Interest in this competition 
naturally is high. Last year, it was 
held in Helena, Montana, and was 
treated by the city as something of a 
civic event. States competing were 
Nevada, Montana, Idaho, California, 
Oregon and Washington, and the 
Committee took action to invite Al- 
aska, British Columbia, Alberta and 
Hawaii to participate in future con- 
tests in addition to the eleven states 
already involved. 

Already, plans are under way for 
staging state contests to pick repre- 
sentatives for this year's Western 
States event. The Western States con- 
test is held in two divisions, one for 
carpenters and one for millmen. The 
winners have their names inscribed on 
perpetual trophies which they keep for 
a year. There are also cash prizes and 
a number of tool awards. 

Connecticut sponsors an annual 
contest, and the January issue con- 
tained a story about the winners of the 
1960 Florida contest. Undoubtedly 
there are others of which we have not 
yet heard. 

24 




Staging apprenticeship contests is 
a hard job and involves a good deal 
of time, effort and expense. But the 
benefits derived more than balance out 



Above is a view of a special exhibition 
showing apprenticeship skills of West- 
ern Carpenters. In photo at left Ever- 
ett Ballard is officiating at the pres- 
entation of an award to Thomas Slight 
of Las Vegas, Nev. 



these cost items. The contests focus 
attention on apprenticeship training as 
nothing else possibly could, particular- 
ly when they are staged in conjunction 
with a home show, county fair, or 
some other civic event attracting large 
numbers of people. 

If interest continues growing in the 
future as it has in the past, a national 
contest may eventually emerge. 



Connecticut Gets In The Act 




Participants in the 1960 Connecticut State Contest are shown above, from left to 
right: Standing, rear: John Lamkin, L. U. 196; Edward Burdick, judge; Patrick J. 
Golden, Jr., L. U. 43; Thomas E. Gunnoud, judge; Raymond Rutledge, L. U. 1626; 
William Smith, judge; Bruce Anderson, L. U. 1013; Peter Callahan, L. U. 746; James 
Zmarlak, L. U. 210. Front row: George Wach, L. U. 115; John Orsini, L. U. 260. 

THE CARPENTER 



Housing Program 
Boon to Carpenters 

President Kennedy has submitted to 
lie Congress a program of very special 
iterest to the Carpenters. It is a 
.ousing program with a new twist, 
"he $3,200,000,000 program is in- 
ended to spruce up the housing in the 
ilder sections of the big cities, and to 
lelp low-income families build quality 
lomes in the $10,000 bracket. 

The bill also contains a provision to 
id in the construction of housing for 
lderly citizens. 

Housing Administrator Robert C. 
Veaver says, "The Kennedy bill em- 
ihasizes the improvement of our exist- 
ig housing supply instead of relying 
in new housing construction for better 
lomes." 

Under the provisions of the bill the 
: HA would have the authority to in- 
ure loans up to $10,000 for basic 
tructural improvement in housing that 
i becoming dilapidated or obsolete. 
Lepayment would be made within 25 
ears and the interest rate no higher 
lan 6%. Present FHA home im- 
rovement loans are limited to $3,500 
nd 5 years repayment and cost the 
orrower more than 9%. 

For low income families the bill 
alls for a 2-year experiment in mak- 
ig FHA-insured 40-year no-down 
ayment mortgages available. The 
resent general ceiling of $9,000 for 

one-family ceiling would be retained 
xcept in high cost areas where it 
/ould be raised from $12,000 to 
15,000. 

The money available to sponsors of 
ousing projects for elderly persons 
/ould be doubled to $100 million 
rom the present authorization. Also 
dditional subsidy to reduce rents by 
10 a month for elderly persons would 
e part of the set up. 

The bill also asks for the building 
f 100,000 new low-rent units. It also 
rovides for $45 million a year for 
arm housing loans and $10 million 
or grants to local bodies to develop 
nd demonstrate new kinds of public 
ousing and FHA insurance on houses 
uilt experimentally with new methods 
nd materials. 

The President asks for a 40-year 
rogram but he suggests that most of 
tie $3,200,000,000 be spent by 1970 
3 spruce up U. S. housing. 






when it comes to training 




ITICES ARE ENTITLED 
TO NOTHING BUT THE BEST 



Your Brotherhood's Apprenticeship Training Course is designed 
to give apprentices complete training in carpentry and millwrighting. 

Divided into units, each unit covers one phase of our trade from 
A to Z. 

The following units now are available: 

CARPENTRY MILLWRIGHT 



Unit 1— Tools, Materials, History of trade 

Unit 2— Foundations 

Unit 3— Rough Framing 

Unit 4— Exterior Finish 

Unit 5— Roof Framing 

Unit 6— Interior Finish 

Unit 7— Stair Building 

Unit 8— Cabinet Making (Mill) 

Uuit 9 — Millwork 

Unit 10— Reinforced Concrete Form Con- 
struction and Heavy Timber Construc- 
tion 

Unit 11 — Millwright 

Unit 12— (Part 1) Blue Print Reading and 
Estimating 

Unit 12— (Part 2) Blue Print Reading and 
Estimating 

Mathematics for Carpentry 

Safety Unit 

Blue Print Plans, A. B.C. (15 to set) 

Blue Print Plan D (14 to set) 

Instructor's Manual, Units I thru XI 

Instructor's Manual, Unit XII, Part 1 & 2 

Instructor's Manual (Mathematics for Car- 
pentry) 

Unit Analysis 

Test Papers— 11 Units and Journeyman, 
Final and Alternate 

Test Papers, per single Unit 

Test Papers— Mathematics, Final and Alter- 
nate 

P. S. These Units Are Just the Ticket for Journeyman Refresher Courses, Too. 

Direct all inquiries to First General Vice President John R. Steven- 
son, 222 E. Michigan St., Indianapolis 4, Ind. 



Unit 1— Safety; and Tools and Materials 
Unit 2— Mathematics and Mechanics and 

Strength of Materials 
Unit 3— (Part 1) Construction Practices 
Unit 3— (Parts 2 & 3) Construction Prac- 
tices 
Unit 3— (Parts 4 & 5) Construction Prac- 
tices 
Unit 4— Receiving, Inspection, and Setting 
of Equipment; Blacksmithing; Welding; 
Electricity; Steamfitting and General 
Maintenance Practices 
Unit 5— Blueprint Reading and Estimating 
Blue Print Plan C— (6 to set) 
Blue Print Plan D— (14 to set) 
Instructor's Manual, Unit I thru V 
Test Papers— 5 Units and Journeyman, 

Final and Alternate 
Test Papers, per single Unit or part 




kPRIL, 1961 



25 




This month's progress report on the headquarters build- 
ing shows impressive shots of the exterior and interior. 
Above workmen are finishing the main entrance way. 
Right photo shows a rooftop view along the restaurant 
side of the building. In lower photos are first pictures of 



the panel installation. The Carpenter photographer toe 
photos shortly after the first panelling had arrived. Tl 
building will have a number of different kinds of wooc 
adding to the beauty of the interiors. The new building 
already becoming a Washington tourist attraction. 




THE CARPENTE 




'1. l^g 



UNION 



L. U. 819 Holds Old Timers Night 




Four of the old timers who were present to receive their 50-year pins are shown 
above: C. O. (Pete) Pierce, Charles Parmelee, Donato Lanzetta and O. A. Thomsen. 
At extreme right is J. A. Markham, president and 35-year member of the local. 



At a recent meeting of Local Union 
No. 819, West Palm Beach, Florida, 
a surprise was in store for a group of 
10 members whose memberships in 
the United Brotherhood date back 
over 50 years. 

At 9:00 P.M., June 20, 1960, Presi- 
dent Markham halted the transaction 
of business at a regular meeting to pay 
tribute to these old timers: C. O. 
(Pete) Pierce, C. J. Parmelee, Frank 
Kaiser, Walter H. Duff, Marius Krogh, 
Donato Lanzetta, Eric Nordstrom, 
Carl F. Smith, Henning Swanson, 
O. A. Thomsen. A part of the group 
was unable to be present. Those 



present were presented with a 50-year 
pin. 

After the presentation ceremonies a 
number of members expressed their 
appreciation for the outstanding work 
accomplished by these old timers, who 
gave of their time and energy to make 
a better way of life for themselves and 
their fellow workers. 

At the close of the meeting, refresh- 
ments were served. A good old get- 
together was enjoyed by all members 
present. Mrs. Pauline Pierce and Mrs. 
J. A. Markham prepared and served 
the refreshments, assisted by members 
of Local Union No. 819. 



"N 



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Oak Lawn, Illinois 



Rochester, Minn. Holds 
Gala Party 




Three retired members of Local 
Union 1382, Rochester, Minnesota, 
received special Christmas presents. 
The presents were 25-year pins pre- 
sented by the union at a Christmas 
party and dance catered by the Ladies 
Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars. 

Some 450 members, wives and girl 
friends attended the party. A turkey 
dinner with all the trimmings started 
the festivities. 

Highlight of the evening was pre- 
sentation of the 25-year pins to Broth- 
ers John W. Lawler, Fred R. Witzke, 
and J. R. Fitzgerald, whose member- 
ships date back more than a quarter 
of a century. All three are charter 
members of the union and have been 
loyal and dedicated members since 
they were initiated on March 20, 
1934. 

In addition to the special pins, each 
of the three retired members was 
awarded a copy of the book, "Portrait 
of an American Labor Leader." 

Brother Axel T. Anderson, who was 
unable to attend the party, also re- 
ceived a 25-year pin and a copy of the 
book. Brother Anderson joined Local 
Union 1644 on April 25, 1935, in 
Minneapolis. 



Credit Union Reports 

Local 666, Mimico, Ontario. Can- 
ada established a Credit Union in 
1953. Recording Secretary C. H. Mc- 
Clelland reports 1960 was a good 
year for the Credit Union. There are 
some 98 members and the credit union 
was able to come to the assistance of 
those who needed loans for tax and 
mortgage payments, home improve- 
ments and auto purchases. A total of 
$10,553 was loaned. Brother McClel- 
land also serves as President of the 
Toronto and District Council of the 
Carpenters. 



APRIL, 1961 



27 



St. Louis Local Honors Five 



L.U. 1491 President Retires 




Carpenters Local 47, St. Louis, Mo. 
recently honored five members who 
have had 50 years continuous mem- 
bership in the Brotherhood. A num- 
ber of officers and delegates were on 
hand to pay tribute to the veteran 
members. 

Seated left to right are honored 
veteran members: Frank Macalady, 
Alex Reuter, Edward Willeke, Charles 
Seyfarth and Tony Herzog. 

Standing left to right are officers 



and delegates of Local 47: Frank 
Krame, Sr., Walter Boul, Trustees; 
Theodore V. Mueller, Recording 
Secy.; Charley Eaton, Vice-President; 
Pleasant Jenkins, Business Represen- 
tative; E. C. Meinert, Secretary-Treas- 
urer of District Council; D. Richard 
Adams, Business Manager of District 
Council; Leroy Lasley, Treasurer; 
Joe Humphrey, President; Kenneth 
Schneider, Conductor; Walter Fisher, 
Financial Secretary; and Gus Stocker, 
Trustee. 



When Brother Daniel J. D. Millard 
recently retired as president of Local 
Union 1491, Royersford, Pennsyl- 
vania, the membership of the union 
deemed it fitting to pay tribute to his 
thirty-two years of faithful service. 

The contributions of Brother Mil- 
lard to the welfare of the union over 
the years has been a saga of dedica- 
tion and devotion to duty. And the 
entire membership of the union wishes 
him many years of health and happi- 
ness in retirement. 



Old Tinier Dies 

The members of Local 1366, 
Quincy, 111., were saddened recently 
at the news of the death of Edward 
J. Rengstorff. He had long been 
prominent in union circles. At one 
time he held the office of Warden of 
the Carpenters, Local 1366. He served 
the local Brotherhood as treasurer for 
more than 50 years. He retired more 
than 30 years ago and was 97 at the 
time of his death. 



He's Golden Westerner 

Board Member Joseph Cambiano was 
master of ceremonies at a recent dinner 
of Local 483, San Francisco, Cal., honor- 
ing 50 year members. Brother Cambiano 




is seen shaking hands with Brother Wil- 
liam Jones, who was the oldest member 
present. He has been a member of the 
Brotherhood for 65 years. 



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THE PAINE COMPANY • 501 Westgate Rd. • Addison, III. 

THE CARPENTER 



tU .lNOIS BUI t0Eft 




Builders Honor Agent 

Eugene P. Ellberg, Business Repre- 
sentative of the Carpenters District 
Council of Madison County, 111., has 
received the meritorious service award 
of the Southern Illinois Builders As- 
sociation. Ellberg was cited for 
"creating a better labor-contractor 
climate." Ellberg, third from left, is 
shown receiving the award. Others 
in the picture are, left to right. Free- 
man Wolfe, J. J. Altman and G. H. 
Sternberg. All three are officials in 
the South Illinois Builders Association. 



Well Done, Brothers 




Several members of Local 183. 
Peoria, 111., recently demonstrated 
they know the meaning of Brother- 
hood. They responded to the call of 
Business Representative Robert Brit- 
ton and constructed a ramp for pupils 
suffering from cerebral palsy to use 
at the Roosevelt School in East Peoria. 
The East Peoria Lumber Co., C. Iber 
& Sons and the Carver Lumber Co., 
each contributed $25 worth of ma- 
terial and the balance of materials 
were underwritten by Local 183. The 
ramp and the volunteers are shown 
above. Ralph Phillips (tin hat) master 
minded the job. The others are Eddie 
O'Donnell, Don Gorman, John Wieda. 
Vernon Auld, Charles Davis. Larry 
Netzke, Stormy Stoner, Cliff Jones, 
Jack Hamm, Jake Blackard. Elwood 
Kimberlin, Mac McFadden, Orville 
Smith and Al Treadway. 




First To Retire 

Five San Diego, Cal., Union Car- 
penters were among the first to retire 
under the San Diego County Carpen- 
ters pension plan. The five received 
their first checks and plaques com- 
memorating their service at a lunch- 
eon held at Shelter Island Inn. They 
are Archie MacKeller, Art Shipway, 
Guy F. Duncan, Solomon Hiatt and 
Jens P. Neilsen. They are shown 
above with their wives and well- 
wishers. 



ALWAYS BOOST THE UNION LABEL 



APRIL, 1961 



29 



Four 50- Year Men Honored by L. U. 78 



50- Year Men Cited 




Local 78, Troy, N. Y., honored four of its 50-year members at dinner. Shown in 
the front row are Robert A. Barron, James Fletcher and James Leslie. Michael 
Coffey was unable to be on hand for the ceremony. Among those paying tribute 
to the four were, left to right, Pat Campbell, General Representative of the Car- 
penters; Walter C. Flanigan, Treasurer of Local 78; R. O. Wallen, Financial Secre- 
tary of Local 78; the Rev. Husselbeck, Our Lady of Victory Church; and Anson B. 
Wright, Troy YMCA. 

Marshall, Texas, Pays Tribute to Oldtimers 




Local 776, Marshall, Tex., has honored 3 members for their 50 years of service. 
They are, left to right: "Pop" Eiland, J. W. Winn and D. S. Wilkerson. 

L. U. 3161 25-Year Members Get Pins 




Mayor Westlake of Columbus, 
Ohio, was on hand to honor two 
"old timers" of Local 200 at a recent 
dinner meeting at the Deshler Hilton 
Hotel in Columbus. One hundred and 
thirty members of the local and their 
wives also helped pay tribute to all 
who have belonged more than 25 
years. Harry Young, center, and Dan 
Cherry, right, both 50-year members, 
are seen chatting with the Mayor. 

Strike Action Drops To 
Lowest Level Since '42 

The year 1960 saw the number of 
strikes at the lowest level since 1942 
and the number of workers affected at 
the lowest number since the postwar 
low of 1957. 

The figures, compiled by the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, brought 
the comment from the Labor Depart- 
ment that "1960 was one of the most 
peaceful years in labor-management 
relations in the postwar period." 

The statistics showed that approxi- 
mately 3,300 work stoppages began 
during the year, affecting about 1,400,- 
000 workers. 



Six members of Local 3161, Maywood, Cal., have received their 25-year member- 
ship pins. Shown above, they are (left to right) Don Lasagna, William Robinson, 
Sylvester Rios, Frank Morello, Michale Quaranta and John Novak. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas 

City, Mo 20 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 20 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III. . 6 
Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 14 
Grip-Tite Mfg. Co., Inc., Winter- 
set, Iowa 14 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 20 

The Paine Co., Addison, III 29 

Skil Corp., Chicago, III 3d Cover 

Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, III. 28 
True Temper Corp., Cleveland, 

Ohio 12 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, Mew York, N. Y. 6 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, III 12 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. .. 20 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Monument to Determination 




Recently, Local Union No. 871, 
Battle Creek, Michigan, moved into 
its fine new headquarters building. In 
itself this fact is scarcely unusual. 
Hundreds of our local unions own 
their own headquarters building. 

What makes the situation at Battle 
Creek particularly significant is the 
fact that a local union of barely three 
hundred members was able to finance 
a headquarters building that many 
unions three or four times its size 
might well envy. 

The whole project was made pos- 
sible by the unusual determination 
and dedication of the members of 
Local Union No. 871. Members 
donated over 2000 hours of labor in 
the erection of the building. Out of a 
membership of three hundred, only 
thirty-four members did not donate 
of their time and skills to the erection 
job, and many of these were either 
too old or too sick to participate. 
Therefore, the building is a real 
tribute to the spirit of unionism that 
flows deeply through the veins of the 
membership of the union. Ninety per- 



cent of the membership contributed 
sweat and skill to the project. Outside 
of the utilities, plumbing, heating and 
electrical work, the building is the 
work of carpenters. 

Located on a lot providing ample 
parking space, the new headquarters 
building of Local Union 871 is tailor- 
made to fit the needs of the organiza- 
tion. For years to come, it will stand 
as a monument to a union member- 
ship that understands and appreciates 
the meaning of the word "brother- 
hood." 

At the dedication ceremonies offi- 
cially opening the building, the mem- 
bership of the Local Union turned 
out en masse with friends and well- 
wishers to place their stamp of ap- 
proval on a job well done. 

A special guest was Finlay Allan, 
assistant to General President M. A. 
Hutcheson. In his brief dedicatory 
remarks, Brother Allan said: 

'To me has fallen the very pleasant 
duty of welcoming you to the dedica- 
tion of this impressive, up-to-date 
building. I consider it a personal 



Veterans, Graduates Honored by Local 




Local 44, Champaign and Urbana, 
111., has amended its by-laws to adopt 
a life membership classification for its 
retired members who have 30 years 
continuous membership in the local at 



the age of 65. Twenty members have 
been given this honor. Fourteen of 
the 20 were present when the mem- 
berships were given out. Also hon- 
ored at the same time were six gradu- 



privilege to be with you on this 
memorable occasion. Every serious- 
minded union man and woman in this 
community, I am sure, is looking with 
pride at this fine structure which to- 
day is to be dedicated as the head- 
quarters of Carpenters Local No. 
871." 

In keeping with the spirit of the 
occasion, a group of old timers in the 
local union was given special recogni- 
tion. On behalf of the union, seven 
old timers whose memberships date 
back at least 40 years were awarded 
Brotherhood rings. 

At the other end of the scale, three 
graduating apprentices — Frank A. 
Lewis, Thomas C. Vaccaro, and Den- 
nis P. Gabriel — were also honored 
for their achievement of gaining 
journeyman status. 

It was a great day for Local Union 
871 and for the community of Battle 
Creek, Michigan. 

The Carpenters of Battle Creek first 
organized in the year 1884. Their 
charter number was 77. But by 1892, 
the union disbanded. Very shortly 
thereafter, another local union was 
organized. It received Charter No. 
345, but its life was of short duration. 
By 1894, it was out of business. But 
in 1901 the Battle Creek Carpenters 
again determined to build a real or- 
ganization. On July 1, they received 
Charter No. 871, and through the 
years they have maintained a dedi- 
cated, militant union. The quality of 
its membership is evidenced by the 
headquarters building it now occupies. 



ating apprentices. Five were on hand 
for the ceremonies. The "oldsters" 
and the "youngsters" are shown to- 
gether above. 

Advanced to Journeyman Carpen- 
ter — front row, left to right: James 
T. Lichtenwalter, Donald R. Sphar. 
Allen D. Brady, Junior C. Ostendorf, 
Everett F. Johnson. Honored but not 
present. Jack Helton. 

Receiving Lifetime Memberships — 
second row, left to right: J. L. Dunn. 
Sr., Henry D. Louthan, Joe T. Lee, 
James A. Everman, Ray O. Johnson. 
M. S. Norman. Back row, left to 
right: Robert Meyers. William E. 
Bourne. H. H. Schroeder, Clyde 
Pence, B. B. Bunn. William O. Mar- 
tin, G. B. Jenkins. Henry Frank. Hon- 
ored but not present: Roy Cloud, El- 
mer W. Ealey. Martin Marr. William 
Marr, L. F. Plumer, George E. 
Stretcher. 



APRIL, 1961 



31 



IN CONCLUSION 




M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



OSE 




TIME magazine, in its March 10 issue, carried a story 
professing that there is a shortage of skilled labor even 
though unemployment is higher than it has been at any 
time since the Depression. Even in Detroit, where one 
auto worker out of four currently is jobless, skilled jobs 
are going begging, according to TIME. 

The article further claims that for every 100 skilled 
workers the nation had in 1955, it will need 122 in 1965, 
and 145 in 1975. 

On paper these predictions sound encouraging. But I 
have become a little bit skeptical of all the rosy pictures 
that the forecasters constantly are painting. 

Last year the department of Labor issued a publication 
called, "Manpower: Challenge of the Sixties." The con- 
clusions drawn by this pamphlet are that by 1970 we will 
require many, many more skilled workers than we now 
have. The question the study raises is, where are we 
going to find the workers? Based on what has transpired 
in the first 16 months of the 1960's, I think a more perti- 
nent question is, where are all the jobs coming from to 
take care of all the people? 

I hope all these rosy predictions come true, but to date 
I have not seen too much evidence tending to bear them 
out. We are more than one-ninth of the way through the 
1960's already, and despite what TIME magazine has 
to say, I believe the job opportunities for skilled men 
today are no better than they were 16 months ago. 

Carpenters and millwrights certainly fall in the cate- 
gory of skilled labor. Yet unemployment among our 



members has been higher this winter than it has been at 
any time since the war. 

From my talks with the officers of other international 
unions I find that we are not standing alone in this re- 
spect. Electricians, machinists, and other skilled trades- 
men are suffering from unemployment to greater or lesser 
degree. Apparently there will have to be a fairly sub- 
stantial upturn in economic activity to absorb all of 
today's skilled craftsmen, let alone make room for an 
additional 20 to 25%. 

Furthermore, the apprenticeship programs jointly de- 
veloped over the years by international unions and 
employers have proved themselves to be both efficient 
and flexible. They have met the test of changing condi- 
tions since the end of World War II. They are geared 
to meet any reasonable challenges the future may bring. 

Our own Brotherhood constantly has had from 30,000 
to 40,000 young men undergoing apprenticeship training 
every year since 1945. At the slightest indication that a 
shortage of skilled carpenters is imminent — as evidenced 
by increased calls for men at the union hall — the number 
can be expanded rapidly; especially if the wage pattern 
for apprentices is made more attractive. 

There are those who want to see apprenticeship training 
emasculated. Instead of apprenticeship training programs 
turning out broadly trained mechanics, they visualize 
vocational schools annually grinding out thousands upon 
thousands of "specialists" trained to handle only one 
narrow phase of a given trade. 

Nobody stands taller in the industrial world than the 
man who has completed his apprenticeship training and 
thereby become a totally skilled mechanic. He is in a 
position to hold his own regardless of what technological 
changes take place. But unless there is a radical change 
in the economic picture, I cannot see an alarming shortage 
of such workers in the foreseeable future. 

The young man starting out today would be wise to 
understand that apprenticeship training offers the greatest 
hope for stable employment in the years ahead. Truly 
skilled men are the first hired and the last laid off. The 
demand for them is much more constant that the demand 
for semi-skilled or unskilled labor is. 

But when the average union hall has dozens or even 
hundreds of skilled men looking for work, it becomes 
difficult to visualize skilled jobs begging for takers next 
year or the year after — attractive as such a prospect 
appears. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




New Skilsaw 6% model guaranteed against "burnouts" 

. . . Motor is backed by full year FREE service* warranty 



This new compact 6'/i" Skilsaw Model 
856 has an exclusive Skit B-P Motor 
that gives "Burnout-Protection" even 
during frequent, excessive overloads. 
In fact, the motor is actually backed 
by a full year free service* warranty! 

And this rugged new Skilsaw model 
has plenty of other features, too, like 
exclusive "Floating Guards" that 
cover the blade completely even on 
extremely shallow cuts . . . exclusive 
"Vari-Torque" Clutch that protects 
against kickback . . . easy-to-use depth 



and bevel controls ... all ball bearing 
construction. There's even an exclusive 
blade lock for quick, easy blade 
changes. 

Compare the Model 856 with any 
top handle saw on the market. And, 
by all means, call or visit your Skil 
Distributor soon for a demonstration 
(he's listed under "Tools-Electric" in 
the Yellow Pages). Or write: Skil 
Corporation, 5033 Elston Avenue, 
Chicago 30, Illinois, Dept. 152D 



4 Top Hand 


e Mod 


els 


All have the features 


of Mod 


?l 856 (see 


left) including new 


B-P Motor 








max. 


amp. 


model blade 




depth 


rating 


no. dia. 




of cut 


at 115V 


856 6V 2 " 




2'/ 8 " 


10 


857 7y 4 " 




2y 2 " 


11 


858 8y 4 " 




2%" 


13 


860 10" 




3 3 / 4 " 


14 




..and SKILSAW POWER TOOLS 



*Service includes free repair or replacement of field and armature and is subject to return of saw to 
Skil Factory Service Center and to stipulations indicated on warranty certificate. 



"Like the Old Song says... 





are a girl's best friem 



GOOD TOOLS, PROPERLY 

USED & MAINTAINED, ARE 

DITTO FOR BUILDING 

TRADES MECHANICS 



= y\ 



OU 



FOLLOW THESE SIMPLE RULES: 

1. Make sure all handles are tight and properly seated. 

2. Every tool is designed for a specific purpose. Do not 
invent ways to use it for another purpose. Do not use 
a screwdriver for a pinch-bar; a chisel for a screwdriver; 
a pair of pliers for a hammer. 

3. All damaged tools should be repaired promptly. Do 
not use a tool until you are sure it is properly repaired. 
Avoid temporary or makeshift repairs. If a tool can- 
not be repaired it should be discarded at once. 



SING THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE 
RIGHT JOB IS A BIG FACTOR 

in pretong ACCIDENTS. 






: * : • 



4. Never use mushroomed tools. Grind down the splayed 
heads or get new tools. 

5. When not in use, tools should be properly stored in a 
suitable chest or in a rack. Never leave tools on a 
bench or table where they can roll off and hurt some- 
one or get damaged. 



J; 'Ij| 






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SAFETY SAFETY SAFETYSAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY SAFETYSAFETY SA s If 



CO 



LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN 



CHAN'CELLORSVILLE 



FREDERICKSBURG 



THE 



CARPENTER 



FOUNDED 



1881 



Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

MAY 1961 




FORT SUMTER 



GETTYSBURG 



WILDERNESS 




/ , , . 








You might work at a lathe, on a tractor, behind a 
counter, behind a desk. It makes no difference. No 
one is immune to the heart diseases, our nation's *1 
health enemy. 

Your Heart Fund is your #1 defense. Your 
contributions support heart research. You make it 
possible for your Heart Association to bring the 
latest research advances to your physician — and to 
protect your heart and all the hearts you love. 



Heart 

Fund 



HEART DISEASE 

#1 Enemy 



HEART FUND 

#1 Defense 



When your local solicitor calls, give generously so 

the fight against deaths from heart disease may go 

forward speedily. 

If you are not contacted by a local solicitor, send 

your contribution to: Heart Fund, c/o your local 

Postmaster. 



i*^Ij><* 




^CAR^ 




THE COVER 

The cover in blue and gray commemorates the cen- 
tennial of the beginning of the Civil War. These two 
colors are indelibly written into American history. They 
recall a tragic saga. In General Sherman's words, "War 
is hell", but civil war is the worst kind of military strife. 
The national wounds that came from it are as acute today 
as they were a century ago. Running the length of the 
cover are the names of the battlefields written deep in 
our national soul. Many readers of THE CARPENTER 
have one or more ancestors that fought — and perhaps 
died — at one of these places. This is more than a map. 
It is living history. 



<3£\[£ 




WE share Carl Sandburg's concern 
that the Civil War Centennial 
is getting out of hand. It seems to be 
taking on all the glitter of a celebra- 
tion. Let us not forget that we are 
marking the observance of the 100th 
anniversary of the outbreak of a war 
— with all the misery, suffering, de- 
struction and death that war brings. 

The Civil War had its profound and 
lasting effects upon the American 
people and, indeed, upon all humanity. 
The scars of that great conflict are 
still sensitive. It has been said that 
for 200 years after her Civil War, the 
people of England just did not talk of 
it. They respected the deep emotions 
roused by the conflict. It might have 
been best for all concerned if we had 
been equally discreet about our Civil 
War. But now we are well launched 
on the official observance. So be it — 
but let us not cheapen the mighty 
occasion. It is not a time for souvenir 
manufacturers, book publishers, travel 
bureaus, etc., to make an "industry" 
of the late war. 

Let us remember the dead. Let us 
recall why they died. Let us reaffirm 
that for which they died. Let us make 
a living reality of freedom in the sec- 
ond half of the 20th Century. It may 
well be that is the kind of memorial 
the boys and men of the Blue and the 
Gray would like. 



VOLUME LXXXI 



James A. Eldridge, Editor 
MAY, 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NO. 5 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

2 

7 

9 
16 
19 



200 Year Old Dream Comes True 
Brotherhood Sponsors Safety Course 
Western Council Meets 
Carpenters at Detroit Industries Show 
Teenagers Brainwashed About Unions 



24 Progress Report 

DEPARTMENTS 

6 Washington Outlook 

12 Editorials 

14 Canadian Section 

20 Budget Battle 

22 In Memoriam 

25 Outdoor Meanderings 

26 Short Cuts 

27 Local Union News 
30 What's New 

32 In Conclusion 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579-P should be senl lo THE 
CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington IS. D. C, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20c in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 





200 
^BARGED 

COMES TRUE 



FOR more than 200 years men have 
dreamed of harnessing the great 
power of the Niagara River. 

Fed by rainfall over millions of 
acres of the North American mid- 
continent, the Niagara carries the 
water of four of the Great Lakes — 
Superior, Michigan, Huron and Erie 
- — to the fifth, Ontario. 

Since the middle of the 18th Cen- 
tury the vast potential of this great 
river has been obvious. First, the 
river provided the impetus for the 
growth of communities along its 
banks. With the coming of industrial 
development the river was the key to 
the development of the entire Niagara 
Frontier. Seven generations of power 
pioneers have kept alive the search 
for more efficient ways to take full 
advantage of the river's power — power 
clearly visible in the world-famous 
drop of 167 feet at Niagara Falls. 

The French built the first sawmill 
on the banks of the Niagara River in 
1751. Between that date and Decem- 
ber 14, 1881, when electric service 
was first sold, the story of the develop- 




At the Niagara Generating Plant concreting is underway 
on the architectural walls. The handiwork of the car- 
penters is seen in the steps, the ledges and the supports. 




This map gives some idea of the scope and 
detail of the work on the Niagara Power 
Project. Below are seen the huge draft rubes. 




merit of the Niagara is a dramatic 
tale. The story has its heroes and its 
villains. There are moments of great 
human triumph and tragic failure but 
today we see the turning of new pages 
in the history of the Niagara Frontier. 

In the last three years the Niagara 
Frontier has gained more public im- 
provement than it received in all the 
years from the turn of the century 
to the start of the present work. 

The Niagara Power Project and its 
related improvements represent the ex- 
penditure of a billion dollars. Most of 
it — S720 million — represents funds of 
prudent investors in Power Authority 
bonds. 

As a direct result of the construc- 
tion of the power project, industry in 
the area has planned a $170 million 
expansion and modernization program 
which will result in nearly 4,000 new 
jobs. 

This great project was formally 
launched 1 1 years ago when the 
United States and its good neighbor, 
Canada, signed the Niagara Treaty 
of 1950. The two countries pledged 
to work jointly to preserve the beauty 
of Niagara Falls which was then 
threatened by erosion. 

The Niagara Power Project, the 
other half of the treaty, is designed 
to harness for man's fullest use the 



river's whole potential for hydro- 
electric power. 

With the permission of Congress 
and under a license of the Federal 
Power Commission, the Power Au- 
thority of the State of New York is 
building this great facility. It will have 
a maximum installed capacity of 
2,190.000 kilowatts, an annual energy 
output of 13 billion kilowatt hours. 
It will be linked with the new 1,824,- 
000 kilowatt St. Lawrence develop- 
ment to give New York State an 
abundance of electrical power. 

On February 10. 1961 — three years 
to the day from the start of construc- 
tion — the first electricity flowed from 
the first generator. 

The driving spirit behind this 
mighty project has been farsighted, 
sharpwitted, caustic Robert Moses, the 
72-year-old chairman of the Power 
Authority of New York. 

Under Moses' driving leadership 
thousands of men in hard hats have 
labored like the Trojans of old and 17 
were killed working under the neces- 
sarily hazardous conditions of the vast 
project. 

Engineers, draftsmen, pipefitters, 
crane and bulldozer operators, car- 
penters, ironworkers, cement finishers, 
electricians, truck drivers and laborers 
have worked around the clock in shifts 
for the past three years. Hard hats, 



earmuffs, gloves and long underwear 
were the "uniform" of the winter 
months. Summer brought the hot sun 
and dust. 

Grocers, merchants, landlords — all 
the community's business men have 
been happy to have the work force 
around. They have bolstered the area's 
sagging economy. 

The workers have lived in trailers 
and rented homes from Niagara Falls 
to Olcott. Some have bought or leased 
homes in the subdivisions of Youngs- 
town. 

They have accomplished feats that 
defy the imagination. They have made 
a reality of the dreams of the men 
who have tried in the past to harness 
the mighty Niagara. Look at their 
record. They dug twin pipelines under 
the city — four miles long and 66 feet 
high — to carry 623,000 gallons of 
water a second from the upper river 
to two electric plants in Lewiston. 

They dug out the face of the gorge 
banks to make room for the giant 
Robert Moses Power Plant. 

They are creating a lake covering 
1 ,880 acres as a water storage reser- 
voir. They have hauled away 39 mil- 
lion cubic feet of earth and rock 
during the excavation. 

Meantime, the engineers poring over 



MAY, 1961 




IIHHUlKi'MAs:?«:i».ld 



The wooden runways and draft tube forms are an important part 
of the complicated construction plan of the Niagara Power Project. 



the blueprints, the supervisors shout- 
ing commands, the skilled tradesmen 
and laborers working with power 
tools, precision instruments, shovels, 
hammers, saws and nails have ac- 
complished a miracle at Niagara. 

They have harnessed the river, re- 
routed it, and built a concrete and 
steel power plant — the largest in the 
free world — in less than three years. 
Power is now flowing from Generators 
No. 1 and No. 2 and more is to come. 
For the first time power from the 
Niagara River development is being 
used to light the homes and drive the 
machines of the industries of the 
Niagara Frontier. 

The Brotherhood can be especially 
proud of the carpenters on the job. 
Forms for all concrete parts of the 
Lewiston generating plant structure 
were built under the direction of Nor- 
ton Stone, general carpenter superin- 
tendent for Merritt, Chapman & Scott 



Corporation. Stone was in charge of 
as many as 700 carpenters at a time. 

All pre-fabricated forms for the 
Moses Power Plant were assembled 
on a great plateau below Lewiston 
Hill. A carpenter shop operated around 
the clock here. 

Wooden forms were prepared for 
the plant's intake structure, penstocks, 
turbine pits, draft tubes and the high- 
ways which cross the top of the plant 
— Lewiston Road and Niagara Park- 
way. 

One of the outstanding achieve- 
ments of the Niagara Power Project 
is the Reservoir Pump-Generating 
Plant. 

Without it the Power Plant itself 
would be able to operate at full capac- 
ity only at night and during the winter 
months. 

This is because the maximum 
quantity of water — about 75,000 cubic 
feet per second — can be drawn from 



the upper river only at night and dur- 
ing the off tourist season. At other 
times — daytime and early evening dur- 
ing the tourist season — only about 
50,000 cubic feet per second can be 
taken into the power plants on the 
U. S. side of the border. The same 
quantities are available on the Cana- 
dian side. 

The peak demands, however, come 
during the daytime and early evening. 
The power itself cannot be stored like 
coal. It must be used at the time it 
is generated, but the water can be 
stored and it is water that is used to 
make the electricity at the Niagara 
Power Project. 

The obvious answer was a reservoir 
and the simplest kind would have been 
one that was fed and emptied by the 
law of gravity — the natural flow of 
the water. But such a reservoir would 
have involved a considerable loss of 
head at the main generating plant. 
There would have been a 14-foot drop 



THE CARPENTER 



Carpenters Were on the Job 

From the outset of the mighty 
Niagara Power Project the Carpenters 
Brotherhood carried its share. The 
basic trades, Carpenters, Laborers, 
Operating Engineers and Truck Driv- 
ers, negotiated a 3-year international 
agreement with the major contractors 
bidding on the job. 

The General Office of the Brother- 
hood assigned General Representative 
Patrick Campbell to supervise the job 
for the Brotherhood. He was named 
permanent chairman of the joint meet- 
ings which were held each month to 
discuss the progress, grievances and 
procedure of the job. 

The daily supervision was assigned 
to Local 322, Niagara Falls, New 
York, with Robert J. Sprague as Busi- 
ness Representative. The huge job re- 
quired the expansion of the Local's 
office staff. Alfred Lewis, Financial 
Secretary, had the job of keeping the 
records and assigning men to the job. 
He died on January 31, 1961. He 
was ably assisted in his job by David 
J. Gibson, Recording Secretary. 

Local 322 had 630 members when 
the job started. During the peak, over 
3,500 Carpenters were employed. A 
majority of these Carpenters came 
from New York State, but many came 
from numerous other states. Over 
2,700 Carpenters were insured under 
the Local's Welfare Fund. 

Charles Johnson, Jr., 1st District 
Board Member and President of the 
New York State Council of Carpen- 
ters, said, "I want to extend our con- 
gratulations to General Secretary Dick 
Livingston, General Representative 
Pat Campbell and to the officers of 
Niagara Falls Local 322, for the 
splendid job they did in advancing 
Carpenters' job claims on the Niagara 
Power Project ... we were able to 
establish legitimately, honestly and 
properly that certain debated work 
belongs wholly to the Carpenters' 
province . . . Carpenters' Unions in 
this state are grateful to Dick Liv- 
ingston, Pat Campbell and their Local 
322 associates for handling with dis- 

through the conduits, the depth of the 
reservoirs and whatever small drop 
might have been necessary between the 
reservoir and the generating plant. 

This would have reduced the 
amount of power that could be de- 
veloped and it also would have in- 
volved the use of the electricity for 
pumps since the water would not 
have flowed by gravity into the kind 

{Continued on page 29) 



patch the members' 'bread-and-butter' 
interests." 

The peak of the job is now over. 
There is still some work to be done 



in 1962 and '63. Along with the 
Power Project itself there are park- 
ways, expressways and the relocation 
of railways and bridges. 




Two members of the Brotherhood stand on their work. This is one 
of the huge draft tubes built for the Niagara Power Project. 




The carpenters constructed these forms in the Carpenter Shop. 
Two members of the Brotherhood place the sheeting on a draft tube 
form during the construction of the Niagara Power Project. More 
than 700 carpenters worked on the mighty Niagara River harnessing 
project. Photos courtesy of Power Authority, State of New York. 



MAY, 1961 



\V- 



WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



HIRING HALLS UPHELD The United Brotherhood was a litigant in a case in which the 
Supreme Court recently gave an opinion by an 8-0 vote upholding the hiring hall 
and upsetting the Brown-Olds doctrine. Justice Felix Frankfurter took no part in 
either the hearing or the decision, hence the eight votes by the court. 

The case involved a Carpenters* local union and its agreement with a busi- 
ness firm in which the two parties agreed to hours, pay, conditions and union 
rules applying in the locality where the work was done. The company agreed to 
hire workers on a referral basis from the local union. Two applicants who did 
not go through the union were denied work because they did not follow the agreed 
upon procedure. 

The case went to the National Labor Relations Board which decided the 
arrangement was a closed shop and the case was appealed from the Board's findings 
and decision. It had taken what it called "remedial action," compelling refunds 
under the famous Brown-Olds doctrine established some time ago. 

The United States Supreme Court reversed the Court of Appeals which had 
upheld the NLRB and said that there was no coercion in the Carpenter case. "Nor 
was there any evidence," said Mr. Justice William 0. Douglas, speaking for the 
court "that any who had voluntarily joined was kept from resigning for fear of 
retaliatory measures against him." 

The court held that the Labor Board in the Brown-Olds case had gone too far 
and had taken punitive action and this was beyond its power. 

"Where no membership in the union was shown to be influenced or compelled 
by reason of any unfair practice, no 'consequences of violation' are removed by 
the order compelling the union to return all dues, and fees collected from mem- 
bers; and no 'dissipation' of the effects of the prohibited action is achieved. 
. . . refunding their dues is not a remedial measure in the competence of the 
Board to impose, unless there is support in the evidence that their membership 
was induced, obtained or retained in violation of the Act.'' 

There was no coercion by the Carpenters and hence no liability. The court 
upset the Brown-Olds doctrine and this action is regarded with great satisfaction 
by the entire union movement and especially by the building trades. 

SITUS BILL IN DANGER AFL-CIO President George Meany and Secretary of Labor Arthur 
Goldberg have gone to bat on Capitol Hill for the situs picketing bill sponsored 
by Congressman Frank Thompson, Jr., Dem. , N. J. and backed by the Building & 
Construction Trades Department. 

Meany and Goldberg said that this is the bill that has been advocated by 
labor and endorsed by the Administration. It will be recalled that the Industrial 
Union Department at the recent legislative conference asked for an agreement on 
amendments to the bill to cover some industrial situations. This step was re- 
garded as one endangering the bill. On the Hill amendments were suggested by 
industrial unions and these indicated a weakening of united labor support behind 
the Thompson bill. With this change of pace in evidence, many in Congress may 
find an excuse to say, "If labor can't agree on what it wants, why should we pass 
any bill?" 

AUTOMATION OFFICE The impact of automation on the labor force is going to get 
some special attention from the Government, according to a recent announcement 
from the Department of Labor. The Department is setting up an Office of Automa- 
tion and Manpower and will be headed by Deputy Assistant Secretary Seymour Wolf- 
bein. 

The office will develop programs for improving testing, counseling, train- 
ing and placement of workers who have been displaced by automation. The office 
will also act as a clearing house for materials on technological development. 

The action by Labor Department officials in establishing the office is a 
realistic appraisal of one of the real needs of our time. 

6 THE CARPENTER 



Brotherhood Sponsors First Safety 
Institute under AFL-CIO Program 




Second General Vice President O. William Blaier welcomes the delegates to the first safety institute held under the AFL- 
CIO program. The meetings were held in Washington, D. C. The delegates attended "school" six hours a day. 



ON April 3 an entire class of 
Brotherhood members assembled 
in Washington, D. C, as a section of 
the first AFL-CIO Safety Institute. 
This participation reflected the strong 
belief of General President M. A. 
Hutcheson in the importance of this 
first step in laying the foundation for 
a real safety program for the labor 
movement. Brotherhood members 
from all over the country (and one 
from Ontario, Canada) attended classes 
six hours a day all that week. Teach- 
ers and texts were provided by the 
Bureau of Labor Standards of the 
U. S. Department of Labor. 

Speaking for General President M. 
A. Hutcheson and the General Office, 
Second General Vice President O. 
William Blaier welcomed the students 
at the opening class. He recalled the 
long tradition of the trade union move- 
ment in promoting the safety and 
health of its members. Summing up 
the current safety needs of the labor 
movement and the United Brother- 
hood, he called attention to the prac- 
tical steps which our local unions and 
district councils should take to initiate 
a safety program. 

Each local union should have a 
safety committee and its members 
should be trained on safety so that 
they can be effective members of the 
committee. Each agreement should 
contain a clause recognizing the 



mutual interest of employer and union 
and should provide for a joint labor- 
management safety committee. The 
contract should set forth safety stand- 
ards to be observed by both parties. 
And a procedure should be established 
for the orderly proceeding of dis- 
agreements on safety problems. 

Assistant Secretary of Labor James 
J. Reynolds and Director Arthur W. 
Motley greeted the students for the 
Department of Labor and the Bureau 
of Labor Standards. George Brown 
of the AFL-CIO gave the students the 
background of the development of 
the Safety Institute. As the AFL-CIO 
spokesman on safety matters, he also 
pitched in from time to time to throw 
light on the trade union viewpoint on 
various safety problems discussed in 
class. 

Following this short get-acquainted 
period, the class members were ready 
to settle down to their task of learning 
as much as they could about safety. 
The class was fortunate to have three 
very competent and agreeable instruc- 
tors from the Bureau — Stanley J. 
Butcher, John V. Waits, and Frank 
Otto. During a long and arduous 
week, they did their very best to im- 
part some of their safety knowledge. 
Judging by the interest and enthusi- 
asm of the students, the efforts of the 
teachers were very successful. 

After learning something of the so- 



cial and economic background of the 
development of the safety movement, 
the class turned to a review of labor's 
role in safety. Just what should our 
unions be doing to assure their mem- 
bers of that most fundamental of 
working conditions — a safe place to 
work? The class agreed that labor 
needed to: 

1. Work for better safety legisla- 
tion, particularly at the state 
level. 

2. Get safety into our collective 
bargaining agreements and en- 
force it after it is there. 

3. Train our own people to work 
effectively to protect the safety 
interests of our members. 

With some idea of where labor fits 
into the general safety picture, the class 
was ready to begin to learn some of 
the basic factors in safety. What is an 
accident? What causes accidents? 
Where do accidents happen? What 
can we do to prevent accidents? These 
may seem like simple questions; but 
any of the Brotherhood students would 
readily agree that they are not so 
simple. Every accident is caused by a 
man acting in an unsafe manner or by 
unsafe working conditions, usually by 
a combination of the two. And it is 
never an easy matter to discover what 
really caused any particular accident. 

Then the class went on to consider 
the real costs of industrial accidents. 



MAY, 1961 




Safety First! The eager students prepare to study during the recent safety institute held under the sponsorship of the Brother- 
hood in Washington, D. C. The delegates agreed upon a three-point program. 



Many employes have no idea of how 
much accidents really cost them in 
dollars and cents. One of the best 
ways to sell safety to an employer 
is to show that it pays — that a safe 
operation is an efficient operation. 

To set up and maintain a safety 
program in a particular operation or 
plant we must find out where we are 
before we can see what needs to be 
done. This means that all accidents 
must be investigated and the proper 
reports and records maintained. The 
class spent a great deal of time in 
learning how to investigate the real 
causes of accidents and to keep rec- 
ords which would serve as a basis for 
taking action to prevent accidents and 
to improve the safety performance of 
our employers. 

The instructors emphasized that the 
real cause (or causes) of an accident 
is not properly identified by a glib 
phrase such as "carelessness of 
worker," but that every accident in- 
volves either a specific unsafe condi- 
tion or a specific unsafe act, usually 
both. An effective preventive action 
can be taken only on the basis of a 
knowledge of the real causes of acci- 
dents. 

This first class of the Safety Insti- 
tute was concerned mainly with teach- 
ing the basic facts and principles of 
safety. Succeeding classes will be 
aimed at coming to grips with safety 
problems in a more specific and con- 
crete manner. The emphasis will be 
on applying what we have learned to 
conditions on the job. We are sure 
that our students will agree that this 
first class has given them a good start 
toward a knowledge of safety prob- 



lems which will be of great value to 
the members they represent. 

Time and effort which the students 
have devoted to gaining a basic knowl- 
edge of safety principles will give them 
a firm foundation for tackling the 
second course of the Institute next 
July. This course will deal with the 
mechanical and physical conditions of 
industrial life. Like the previous 
course, it will be conducted by quali- 
fied safety engineers from the Bureau 
of Labor Standards. If our students 
continue to put forth the enthusiasm 
and hard work they have shown in 
this first course, they, their members, 
and the labor movement in general 
will be making a real profit from this 
first AFL-CIO Safety Institute. 

PARTICIPANTS 

F. A. Acton 

276 York St. 

Kingston, Ontario, Canada 
John Anello 

1419 South Clarion St. 

Philadelphia 47, Pennsylvania 
Charles G. Bishop 

348 West Rayen Ave. 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Frederick N. Bull 

1730 Andover 

Oklahoma City 20, Oklahoma 
Donald F. Fornear 

2123 Avenue Planeta 

Tucson, Arizona 
Peter M. Hager 

3527 East Jackson 

Spokane, Washington 
Nicholas R. Loope 

1499 Irving St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



Dan M. McKay 

20232 South West Birth 

Santa Ana, California 
J. E. Sheppard 

44 North East 52nd St. 

Miami 37, Florida 
Chester V. Smith 

709 Littlefield Building 

Austin, Texas 
George E. Stein 

1203 Regal St. 

Houston, Texas 
William Earl Adkins 

4449 Quieto Court 

Denver 21, Colorado 
James F. Bailey 

4401— 56th Ave. 

Bladensburg, Maryland 
Paul H. Connelly 

Indianapolis, Indiana 
Benjamin T. Gray 

8132 Winthrop St. 

Philadelphia 36, Pennsylvania 
Robert E. Harris 

Kalispell, Montana 
J. F. Murff 

2157 Bankhead Highway 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Peter A. Reilly 

470 Stuart 

South Boston 16, Massachusetts 
Samuel Ruggiano 

RFD #1 

Clay, New York 
Stanley D. Skirvin 

Licking Pike 

Newport, Kentucky 
Fred H. Witte 

2418 Central Drive 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 
C. Clifton York 

2124 Ash wood Ave. 

Nashville 12, Tennessee 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



Drive for Greater Wood Use Mapped 

Western Council to Set up "Task Force" to Stimulate Action on all Fronts 



By E. R. "Buzz" Busselle 

Editor, The Union Register 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Delegates 
to the Western Council of Lumber 
& Sawmill Workers' 24th annual 
convention, March 27-30, carried 
home with them a "task force" mes- 
sage aimed bull's-eye style at pro- 
moting wood use in construction of 
all types. 

Resolution calling for setting up 
of the "task force" by Western 
Council to create demand for wood 
usage everywhere in construction 
work, especially schools and other 
such buildings, was approved with 
enthusiasm by delegates, who en- 
visioned increased jobs in the lum- 
ber industry and a rise in work for 
the carpentry trades. 

Lyle Hiller, Brotherhood general 
executive committee member from 
the seventh district, and Peter E. 
Terzick, Brotherhood general treas- 
urer, acclaimed the program as one 
of the important projects for com- 
ing months. 

To Use "Task Force" 

Earl Hartley, executive secretary 
of Western Council, said the execu- 
tive committee .of the council will 
set up the "task force" committee. 
Preparatory plans already are under 
way. 

Hiller, in his address to the alert 
and very attentive 400 delegates and 
guests, called the plan vitally im- 
portant to the future of the West 
Coast wood industry, pointing out 
that a concentrated effort has not 
been put on to impel use of wood 
products in construction work. He 
stated there was no doubt in his 
mind that "Western Council is the 
vehicle to carry out the wood pro- 
motion plan." 

"It will take the help of the Con- 
struction Carpenters, the Millmen, 
Shingle Weavers, Furniture Work- 
ers and others in the Brotherhood 
to put this program across," said 
Hiller, calling for all-out coordina- 
tion. 



Terzick emphasized the impor- 
tance of wood products in all proj- 
ects, touching heavily on residential 
construction and education of the 
public to benefits of using wood in 
building programs. 

The General Treasurer also told 
delegates that progress always in- 
volves an endless struggle, and the 
many problems involved create a 
challenge to organized labor. He 
expressed confidence that labor will 
remain strong but must prepare for 
some real battles on the road to 
future accomplishments. He warned 
that any lethargy by labor could 
turn the pages back to days of the 
30's. 

About automation, Terzick said 
"every repetitive job is doomed to 
be taken over by machinery." He 
commented that machines are in 
many cases taking over manual 
power, and now are beginning to 
replace brain power. 

His automation topic tied in with 
that of one of the convention's 
earlier speakers, Ted F. Silvey, 
AFL-CIO research department 
representative. Silvey saw earlier 
retirement and more leisure hours 
for mankind through automation — 
if used right. 

Jack T. Conway, deputy admin- 
istrator of the Federal housing and 
home finance agency, viewed con- 
struction as pointing upward, with 
housing starts showing gains since 
January. This means more jobs in 




Lyle Hiller, 7th District Board Mem- 
ber, and Earl Hartley, Executive Secretary 
of the Western Council talking together 
during session of the Western Council. 



construction carpentry and the 
lumber mills and bodes well for 
strengthening of the nation's 
economy, he said. 

Conway said the Kennedy ad- 
ministration's proposed $2.5 billion 
program over the next two years is 
designed to cover all categories of 
demand — from young to the pen- 
sioner. 

Western Council's Executive 
Secretary Hartley outlined to the 
convention the many gains achieved 
in the past three years, citing aggre- 
gate of 28 cents hourly. He also 
pointed to setting up of the coun- 
cil's defense trust fund program 
with more than 36,000 participants. 
Other benefits included pensions 
covering some 10,000 at Georgia- 
Pacific Corporation and more than 
40,000 Lumber and Sawmill Work- 
ers being under health and welfare 
programs. 

Paper Reviewed 

Asa T. Williams, member of Car- 
penters Local 226 of Portland, 
Oregon, and president of Portland 
District Council of Carpenters who 
is known as the "godfather" of The 
Portland Daily Reporter — this city's 
only 100 percent union daily news- 
paper — gave delegates a concise 
picture of the new publication. "It 
is a true representative of the trade 
union people," he said. A large 
group of delegates accepted his in- 
vitation to visit the new plant 
housed in a building which Wil- 
liams, virtually single-handed, had 
raised funds through unions for 
purchase. He is president of Port- 
land Rose Development Company. 

The large list of speakers at the 
four-day convention included: Ken- 
neth Davis, Brotherhood West 
Coast coordinator; Paul Rudd. 
president of Washington State 
Council of Carpenters; Darrell Dor- 
man, president of Idaho State AFL- 
CIO; Ed Weston, president of 
Washington State Labor Council, 
AFL-CIO; William Sidell, executive 
secretary of Los Angeles District 



MAY, 1961 



Council of Carpenters; George 
Hann, executive secretary of Oregon 
State Council of Carpenters; Nick 
Cordill, president of California State 
Council of Lumber and Sawmill 
Workers; Anthony Ramos, Cali- 
fornia State Council of Carpenters. 

All officers were re-elected for 
four-year terms. They include: 
President — Joseph Hazard, San 
Francisco. Executive Secretary — 
Earl Hartley, Portland, Oregon. 
Vice President — Robert C. Weller, 
Kalispell, Montana, and John 
Moore, warden, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

William E. Wilson, Santa Rosa, 
California, was elected conductor. 
It is his first term. 

Delegates gave full authority to 
Western Council's executive com- 
mittee to act in coming negotiations. 
Approval was unanimous. Negotia- 
tors will seek a 23-cent package, 
including 3 cents for adjustments 
of health and welfare, 10 cents in 
wages and 10 cents in pensions. 

Resolutions given approval by 
delegates covered many subjects, 
one strongly opposing export of logs 
to foreign countries, another em- 
phasizing more widespread use of 
Union Label on wood products and 
other merchandise as one method 
of defeating cheaply produced 
imports. 

Six-hour day, 30-hour week was 
endorsed as a possible answer to the 
spread of automation. 

1961 DIVIDENDS RUNNING 
AHEAD OF LAST YEAR'S 

Dividends for 1961 thus far are 
running comfortably ahead of the 
same period a year ago by a margin 
of more than $50,000,000. 

March dividends totaled $1,957,- 
000,000 bringing the total for the 
first three months of the year to 
$3,428,000,000— an increase of 2 per 
cent for the three month period. 

Gains centered in utilities, commu- 
nications and finance groups, with 
some step-ups in automobiles, paper 
and printing and chemicals. 



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10 



THE CARPENTER 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
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the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
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There are 2400 widths of build- 
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foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
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A hip roof is 48'-9 1 / 4" wide. Pitch 
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out the length of Commons, Hips and 
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Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid-C.O.D. fee extra. 
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Californians add 4% 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 



They Defend Us 

During the week of May 13- 
21, on different days in different 
areas, the Department of De- 
fense will conduct "Armed 
Forces Day" observances. These 
are designed to promote public 
interest in and understanding of 
our vital defense effort. 

In places where there are 
military installations, there will 
be "open house" programs to 
which the public will be invited. 
This will give many citizens an 
opportunity to see how their 
taxes are being spent in the de- 
fense effort. 

The men and women who 
wear the American military uni- 
forms today guard not only the 
freedom of the U. S. but they 
stand on guard 'round the entire 
free world. They deserve our 
loyal support. During "Armed 
Forces Week" every American 
can help boost the morale of 
those in our armed forces by 
participating in these local ob- 
servances to the fullest extent 
possible. 



^^^^w ■# Cli9 




& Builders Guides 




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roofs • How to estimate costs • How to build houses.iVj 
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MAY, 1961 



11 



lETLDITOMAli 





Let's Tell Union Story to Young People 

On page 19 of this issue of The Carpenter is an 
article on the results of an opinion survey that Pur- 
due University conducted among a select group of 
American teenagers. The questions concerned youth's 
attitude toward industrial relations. The poll shows 
some results that ought to be of concern to those with 
a stake in the future of the labor movement — and 
that includes every man and woman who works for 
a living. 

There can be little doubt in the mind of any- 
one who studies this poll that a great job of 
"brainwashing" has been done to our young 
people in the last 10 years. The anti-labor 
campaigns, the smear headlines, the incessant 
flow of propaganda about graft and corruption 
in unions has had its damaging effect upon a 
large number of teenagers. On the other side 
of the coin the same young people seem to have 
gotten a good impression of the moral standing 
of businessmen generally. Perhaps most 
ludicrous of all is the conclusion of more than 
half the teenagers questioned that the news 
media — press, radio and TV — favor neither 
business nor labor. It is obvious that somebody 
has failed to teach these youngsters to read their 
daily papers with that critical eye so necessary 
to free men. 

All of this raises some interesting questions. What 
kind of social science textbooks are being used in our 
high schools? What is being taught about the history 
of the labor movement in America? Who selects what 
"heroes" in U. S. history to present to these young 
students? Are the texts, the lectures and the dis- 
cussions slanted to put all business on the side of the 
angels and all labor on the side of Satan himself? 

Another set of questions also present them- 
selves. At the local level are the leaders and 
members of unions making an attempt to tell 
the magnificent story of the labor movement? Are 
young people encouraged to see unions in action? 
The local Rotary Clubs entertain high school 
students at every weekly luncheon meeting. Do 
local union leaders take the opportunities pre- 
sented to them to tell labor's story on the many 
public platforms available in every community? 
Do we go out of our way to answer the questions 
of young people in their discussion groups? It 
may be a slogan but it is true of young people 



today— "Youth Wants to Know." What are 
unions doing to tell them? 

There are a number of things that can be done and 
there are printed materials to help with the job. In 
fact, the Michigan State AFL-CIO has recently made 
available for general distribution 4 pamphlets they 
have used in this field. The Education Department of 
the Michigan State AFL-CIO held a number of dis- 
cussions with educators and found a common lack 
of resource material dealing with organized labor. 
These pamphlets were prepared as a part of the 
answer. The pamphlets are — 

Teaching High School Students About Labor 
Unions — this publication describes a program 
that was used in Boulder, Colo., to teach facts 
about unions to high school students. 

Union Political Activity Spans 230 Years of 
U. S. History. An AFL-CIO brochure briefly 
outlining highlights in the long history of the 
trade-union political action. 

Myths and Facts About Labor Unions. A re- 
print of an article by the Religion and Labor 
Council of America outlining some of the mis- 
understandings about unions. 

Verdict at Kohler. An UAW Education De- 
partment publication explaining the verdict of 
the prolonged strike at Kohler in Wisconsin. 
Dan Stevens of the Michigan AFL-CIO Education 
Department will be glad to mail copies of these to 
anyone who asks for them. His address is 716 
Lathrope Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

We recommend that members of the Brotherhood 
pass these along to young Americans after they have 
read them themselves. And suggest to the youngster 
that he hand the pamphlets to his social studies teacher 
after he has finished with them. 




Canada Talks Back 

The Kennedy Administration is reviewing U. S. 
foreign policy around the globe. The experts are busy 
predicting that the next few months will bring some 
significant changes in the American posture. Our 
basic national goals, ambitions and ideals do not 
change with each new national administration, but 
new personalities in the White House and the State 
Department must test the winds of history and adjust 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



the sails of the ship of state. Otherwise we strike a 
reef or two. 

Canadian-American relations deserve top priority 
in the review. There are some alarming signs that 
some dangerous rifts are coming between these two 
old friends. Mr. Brian McAuliffe, a distinguished 
journalist who lives in Coburg, Ontario, recently high- 
lighted some of these problems. Writing in America, 
he pointed out that in a recent editorial the Toronto 
Globe and Mail said, 

'Wo wonder there is talk of neutralism in 

Canada, of retreat from existing commitments. 

If such talk disturbs Washington, let Washington 

understand the essential reason for it. Why do 

some Canadians want out of NOR AD (North 

American Air Defense Command), out of 

NATO? Because Canada, an industrial nation, 

has never been fully in them, and because the 

arms lobby in Washington wants to keep it that 

way." 

As McAuliffe says, "These are the words of an 

angry Canada — a Canada once overwhelmingly 

friendly to the U. S. but now counting the cost." 

What has gone wrong? To most Americans 
it will come as a surprise to learn that all is not 
well in our relations with our long-time ally to 
the north. It can be said in defense of our 
ignorance that little news about Canada appears 
in our newspapers so it is hard for Mr. John 
Citizen to know. 
Mr. McAuliffe documents his case — "Two years 
ago, Canada was testing the Avro Arrow, a jet inter- 
ceptor of remarkable efficiency. Blocked from selling 
it to either NORAD or NATO, the Canadian manu- 
facturers were forced to abandon the project. The 
test models were destroyed, and 12,000 men were 
thrown out of work. A deliberate brush-off by the 
U. S. had caused the whole thing, and it has not been 
forgotten." 

There are other problems. The U. S. is investing 
heavily in Canada. These investments imply obliga- 
tions. McAuliffe cites two examples in which U. S. 
investors have ignored Canada's interests — 1. Many 
parent companies refuse to allow their Canadian sub- 
sidiaries to compete in world markets. 2. American 
investment militates against the processing of Cana- 
dian raw materials in Canada. These deterrents occur 
at a time when ... 10% of Canada's work force is 
unemployed . . . 

All this brings up Cuba. Mr. McAuliffe re- 
minds us that when Canada said it would be 
pleased to do business with Cuba, the U. S. press 
was critical but that same press was silent about 
many Americans who were continuing to do 
business with Cuba. Canadian businessmen re- 
turning from Havana reported that for every one 
Canadian doing business there, there were one 
hundred Americans — and weeks after the U. S. 
embargo was supposedly imposed. It also 
follows that Canadians ask themselves this 
question, "Would the Cuban tragedy have oc- 
curred if American investors and American busi- 



ness firms had been more prudent, more 
interested in the general welfare of the Cubans 
and Cuba?" It is logical to assume the Cana- 
dians hope U. S. investment in their country 
does not lead to a similar tragedy. 
The Canadians are alarmed to learn that the U. S. 
sources now control the distributing agencies for 
newspapers and magazines in Canada. Is anyone 
naive enough to ask if Canadian periodicals get a fair 
break from the representatives of American free 
enterprise? 

As Mr. McAuliffe says, "If rapproachement is 
actually desired, much will depend upon the attitude 
which the new administration in Washington adopts 
toward Canada. Now is the time for Americans to 
take a long and new look at their northern neighbor 
... it would be prudent for them to discard any 
preconceived notion that Canada is some sort of poor 
relation . . . The U. S. has far greater need of Canada 
than Canada has of the U. S. This is especially true 
of natural resources, in which the U. S. is relatively 
poor and Canada incredibly rich . . . Note also that 
Canada is at present the best customer the U. S. has 
for its products . . ." 

The international unions can offer the U. S. 
government and American business some advice. 
For many years the international unions have 
had Canadian chapters. These international 
unions have spent time, money and manpower 
helping Canadians establish strong unions. In 
these years an atmosphere of mutual respect, 
confidence and cooperation has been created. In 
the union conventions the Americans and the 
Canadians meet on equal footing. The objectives 
of the Canadians and Americans have advanced 
together in the international unions. 
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Rusk, please note. 



Here We Go Again 

The Wall Street Journal reports that the drive for 
Right-to-Work Laws, "left for dead in 1958, aims for 
a comeback." It seems, according to the famous 
business newspaper, that the movement to ban union 
shops has picked up a number of new members and 
more important, has a "record rise in revenue." 

The movement now claims some 18,000 business- 
men have joined this union-wrecking "gang" and the 
income from annual dues is several hundred thou- 
sand dollars a year. The figures are kept secret. (Con- 
gressional committees please note that interesting 
point.) 

According to the Wall Street Journal, Maine and 
Oklahoma are the two states that have been selected 
as the next targets for these laws. 

The backers of these "right-to-wreck unions" laws 
now claim it is safe politically to back these laws be- 
cause union workers have been unable to show they 
can be effective politically in defeating "right-to- 
wreck" lawmakers. 

Should we examine our conscience? 



MAY, 1961 



13 





o 



HV 



\mIL1IJ Hif 



S E CT I ON 



NATIONAL MEDICAL CARE PLAN AHEAD 



THE trade union movement in 
Canada has always been a strong 
advocate of a comprehensive prepaid 
national health care program. 

Progress toward a national plan has 
not been spectacular but it has been 
steady. At the present time two im- 
portant investigations are under way 
which should bring the advent of pre- 
paid medical care on a national scale 
a great deal closer. 

The first is the careful survey now 
in its last stages under the auspices of 
a committee appointed by the Sas- 
katchewan government. This govern- 
ment pledged itself to a provincial 
prepaid medical care program before 
the last election. It was bitterly and 
viciously fought by the organized 
medical profession, but the govern- 
ment was re-elected by a good ma- 
jority. It is committed to install the 
program within the next year or two — 
certainly not too long after the special 
committee reports its findings. 

This same government pioneered a 
prepaid provincial hospital plan in 
1947 which was the model and the 
forerunner of the national prepaid 
hospital plan in effect in all 10 prov- 
inces of Canada today. 

The medical care program instituted 
by that government will undoubtedly 
bring new pressure to bear on the 
other governments in Canada. There 
appears to be little doubt that Canada 
will have a prepaid national program 
within this decade. 

The pressure on the federal govern- 
ment has already made itself felt. 
That government is in process of set- 
ting up a Royal Commission on pre- 
paid plans, perhaps with a view to 
formulating policy on this vital matter. 
It's an open question whether another 
Royal Commission on medical care 
insurance is needed. A comprehensive 



document on a national program was 
made public in 1945. But an up-to- 
date survey can do no harm if it does 
not create a barrier to effective action. 

The Canadian Labour Congress has 
stated in its policy that a comprehen- 
sive health services program must pro- 
vide complete health care including 
preventive and diagnostic as well as 
curative and rehabilitative services by 
physicians, surgeons and other special- 
ists, hospitals and other agencies. 

Through the years the advances in 
medical science have paralleled the 
changes brought about through the 
industrial revolution, but the equitable 
distribution of the fruits of these 
changes have failed to keep abreast 
of the times. 

Trade unions have solved the prob- 
lem in part by including medical and 
other services in their collective bar- 
gaining agreements with management. 
Large numbers of other people in the 
community have also enrolled in 
group medical and hospital plans, both 
commercial and non-profit. 

These steps are an indication of 
public demand for prepaid care rather 
than a fulfillment of the need. A few 
years ago the Canadian Sickness Sur- 
vey proved that the lower income 
groups have greater need for health 
care, but received less than higher in- 
come groups. Dr. Joseph Willard, di- 
rector of research and statistics of the 
Dept. of Health and Welfare, said: 
"It is quite clear that a great number 
of our people aren't getting the medi- 
cal services they should have." 

The private plans proved expensive 
without giving full value for the 
money spent. Prof. Malcolm Taylor 
of the University of Toronto quoted 
these figures on 1953 administrative 
costs: "Of every insurance dollar on 
administration, a casualty company 



paid 42.6 cents, a life insurance com- 
pany paid 17.5 cents, Ontario Blue 
Cross paid 7 cents, B.C. Hospital In- 
surance paid 6 cents, and Saskatche- 
wan Hospital Service paid 4 cents. 
The more money spent on administra- 
tion, the less there is available for 
benefits." 

Prof. Taylor also estimated that in 
1954, 66% of Canadians were un- 
protected for surgical expenses, 75% 
were unprotected for medical bills. 
These figures are out of date, but 
even if the improvement in coverage 
has been substantial, most of the popu- 
lation would still be either without 
adequate protection, or getting less 
than full value for their health dollar. 

In any case whatever percentage of 
the public might be covered by pri- 
vate plans has little or no bearing on 
the rationalization of a relatively 
chaotic system. 

The 1945 Green Book proposals 
of the Federal Government admitted 
that "health insurance has been widely 
adopted because it is regarded as the 
best means of meeting and of dis- 
tributing fairly the costs of illness, and 
in conjunction with preventive serv- 
ices, of improving the general health 
of the nation." 

These are some of the reasons why 
the decision of the Saskatchewan gov- 
ernment to proceed with a prepaid 
medical care program is such an im- 
portant step. It is a tribute to the de- 
termination and public spirit of the 
premier of that western province, Hon. 
T. C. Douglas. 

The trade union movement in 
Canada is looking forward with great 
interest to this further example of 
leadership by the Douglas government, 
confident that it will speed up the 
establishment of similar plans in the 
rest of Canada. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Canadian 
Short Notes 



Official figures revealed that 719,- 
000 Canadians were out of work at 
mid-February — 11.3% of the working 
force. The figure was 599,000 in 
February 1960. Unemployment hit 
18% in the Maritimes, 14.5% in 
Quebec and 13.9% in British Colum- 
bia. Ontario has 8.6% out of work 
and the Prairies 7.1%. 

Anything over 3% is just too high. 

A first agreement has been signed 
between UBCJA Local 1450 and the 
Charles Huffman contracting firm in 
Peterborough, Ontario, according to 
organizer Derek Manson. 

In Hamilton, unemployment in the 
building trades is reported to be a 
third higher than a year ago. The 
Labourers show the largest number 
unemployed, followed by the Carpen- 
ters. 

The Toronto and District Council 
of the United Brotherhood has asked 
the Toronto Builders Exchange for an 
undertaking that one out of every four 
carpenters hired will be over 60 years 
of age. The Toronto Carpenters have 
also asked for a shorter work week — 
35 hours instead of 40 — and a 45 cent- 
an-hour increase to make up for the 
shorter hours. Rate now is $2.95 an 
hour. Another demand is a 10-cent- 
an-hour welfare plan, a twodollars-a- 
week tool allowance, double pay for 
overtime and increased vacation pay. 

The Ontario government is putting 
a sales tax into effect starting July 
1st. The move has been protested by 
the Ontario Federation of Labor. "Not 
only is a sales tax an unfair burden on 
the lower-income consumer, but its 
inevitable effect would be to dis- 
courage consumption at the very time 
it should be encouraged." 

The Mine, Mill and Smelter Work- 
ers Union, western district, negotiated 
a contract with the Consolidated 
Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada 
Ltd. covering construction tradesmen 
building a mining plant and camp at a 
copper property near Port McNeill 
on the northern end of Vancouver 
Island. 

The Vancouver Island Building 
Trades Council protested the agree- 
ment. 



Two Toronto Telegram reporters, 
Frank Drea and Harry Allen, have 
captured the coveted Heywood Broun 
award of the American Newspaper 
Guild. 

The Broun award for the best 
example of crusading journalism in the 
past year went to Drea and Allen, both 
members of the Toronto Newspaper 
Guild, for a series of articles last 
summer exposing squalid working con- 
ditions of immigrant labor in the 
Toronto area. The Toronto reporters 
are the first Canadians to win the 
award. 

Hamilton's Local 18 is making a 
survey of the health and welfare needs 
of its membership. A pension and 
welfare plan was one of the main 
reasons for the 92-day strike which 
ended Feb. 12, 1960. The question 
being asked the membership, accord- 
ing to financial secretary Earl Rosa- 
mond, is "Are you in favor of a health 
and welfare plan?" The fate of the 
plan will depend on the will of the 
members. Wages go to $2.98 an hour 
by May 1st in any case. 

A separation of the National Em- 
ployment Service from the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission and a 
fundamental revision of the unemploy- 
ment insurance program has been 
called for by the Canadian Welfare 
Council. The Council asks that the 
NES be put under the Department of 
Labor. 

In Ottawa the Builders Exchange 
asked the construction unions to take 
a 10-cents-an-hour pay cut. This 
suggestion got nowhere. Building 
wages are already below the levels in 
cities like Toronto and Hamilton while 
the cold weather reduces the working 
period often to six or seven months a 
year. 

Abuse of management powers has 
gone virtually unnoticed and un- 
checked while labor laws have tended 
to tie the hands of union members, the 
Ontario Federation of Labor charged 
in its annual submission to the Ontario 
Government. 

Legislation to curb the employ- 
ment of strike breakers is being advo- 
cated by the 120,000-member Toronto 
and District Labor Council. 



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MAY, 1961 



15 



Carpenters' Large Display a Real 
"Hit" at Detroit Industries Show 



Cobo Hall, the fabulous civic center 
recently completed by the City of 
Detroit, probably will house hundreds 
of important events in the years ahead. 
However, it is doubtful if it will ever 
host a gayer, livelier or more popular 
event than the 1961 Union Industries 
Show which played there April 7-12. 

Nearly 100,000 spectators crowded 
through the doors the first day. Many 
of them were on hand for the opening 
day ceremonies, when such notables 
as George Meany, AFL-CIO presi- 
dent, and Arthur Goldberg, Secretary 
of Labor, participated in ribbon-cut- 
ting ceremonies in the presence of 
hundreds of international union offi- 
cers and other dignitaries from all 
walks of labor, industry and govern- 
ment. 

A more perfect setting for labor 
and industry's annual showcase salute 
to teamwork could hardly be found. 
Cobo Hall could accommodate three 
football games and a hockey game 
simultaneously. In fact, it was hous- 
ing the ABC Bowling Congress, the 
World Championship Table Tennis 
matches, and a national cat show 
while the Union Industry Show was 
in progress. 

Shadowless lighting and clear span 
with no obstructing columns make the 
exhibition space alloted to the Show 
ideal for showing off the millions of 
dollars' worth of union-made goods to 
the very best advantage. And the citi- 
zens of Detroit and environs took full 
advantage of the occasion. Close to 
a million of them passed down the 
wide show aisles before the doors 
were closed on the last day. 

For many years in a row our 
Brotherhood's exhibit has been among 
both the biggest and most attractive 
in the Show. This year's exhibit lived 
up to the tradition. Jointly sponsored 
by the General Office and the Detroit 
District Council, our Brotherhood's 
exhibit contained many examples of 
the craftsmanship our members dis- 
play in their daily work. 

From the facsimile of our Brother- 
hood's Label executed in linoleum on 
the floor of the exhibit to the decora- 
tive brass balls topping the modernis- 
tic pipe pillars in the center booth, 
our Brotherhood's contribution to the 
Show was a tribute to craftsmanship. 

An apprentice booth called atten- 







"\tl "warns i 

- -feARp ENTERS 




. „_* .4. .a, 

Spectators view one section of Carpenters' exhibit. 



tion to the completeness of the train- 
ing young men undergo to achieve 
the status of journeyman carpenter. 
A complete built-in kitchen, a baby 
conveyor, a complete office equipped 
with movable partitions, and a display 
of fabricated trusses and finished fur- 
niture gave dramatic evidence of the 
high degree of craftsmanship that 
these young men can command after 
they have completed their training. 

A raffle of government bonds do- 
nated by the General Office and the 
Detroit District Council had flocks of 
people lined up before our Brother- 
hood's exhibit most of the time. Re- 
prints of "The Tacoma Story" telling 
the advantages of wood school con- 
struction were handed to the people 
as they waited to fill out their raffle 
tickets. 

Jointly planned and supervised by 
First General Vice President John R. 
Stevenson and L. M. "Boots" Weir, 
secretary of the Detroit Council, our 
Brotherhood's exhibit was a credit to 
all concerned. It set a standard future 
shows will have difficulty surpassing. 



COOKFOftTHC 
UMON 

CAseo 




Good News for U. S. 
Savings Bond Owners 

Members of the Brotherhood and 
their families will be among the thou- 
sands of Americans pleased with the 
new regulations affecting Series E Sav- 
ings Bonds, recently announced by the 
U. S. Treasury Department. 

The new regulations provide that 
holders of Series E Savings Bonds that 
were issued from May, 1941 through 
May, 1949 — the first of these will be 
20 years old on May 1, this year — 
may now hold these bonds for an 
additional 10 years and earn a full 
3% % interest per year, compounded 
semi-annually. American wage earn- 
ers now have more than $38 billion 
invested in Series E Bonds. 



Anyone for Golf? 

A group of brothers in the 
Building Trades in the metro- 
politan area of New York (in- 
cluding New Jersey and 
Connecticut) are organizing a 
golf tournament to be held some 
time this Fall. The dates have 
not yet been set. Any member 
of the Brotherhood who plays 
golf and wants to join the fun 
should contact Mr. F. Edward 
Nolan, 118 Gaylor Rd., Scars- 
dale, N. Y. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




2 1 1*» 

rxi^BROTHERHOOO 

-jjJTRPJT 



Above — AFL-CIO President George Meany is 
shown with Vice President John R. Stevenson at 
the union display. 

Left — At the Carpenter exhibit are, left to right, 
Joseph Lewis, secretary-treasurer, Union Label & 
Service Trades Department; Finlay Allen, As- 
sistant to the General President; General Treasurer 
Peter Terzick, AFL-CIO President George Meany 
and L. M. Weir, secretary-treasurer, Detroit, Mich., 
District Council of Carpenters. 




L. M. Weir of the District Council makes drawing at the large 
savings bond drum during the 1961 Union Industries Show. 



One of the many fine exhibits which made up the 
multi-unit exhibit of Carpenter-made equipment. 



MAY, 196 1 



17 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
11 1 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas' City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



TO ALL FINANCIAL SECRETARIES — 

DEATH AND DISABILITY CLAIMS 



It is the desire of the General Office to 
process and properly dispose of all applica- 
tions for funeral or disability donations as ex- 
peditiously as possible. Financial Secretaries 
can greatly assist us in that endeavor by seeing 
that each claim is completely and properly 
filled out and promptly mailed directly to the 
GENERAL TREASURER, along with the 
required supporting papers. 

As the funeral donation on the death of a 
member is payable to the decedent's estate, 
or to the person presenting proof that he or 
she has paid the funeral expenses, with each 
such claim we must have either Letters of 
Administration or the funeral bill, indicating 



who the responsible person is. 

This is not required in a claim for funeral 
donation on the death of a member's wife or 
husband. In such claims the member should 
always be named as "Applicant" for the dona- 
tion, unless the member for some reason is 
incompetent and unable to take care of his or 
her own affairs. In that event we should have 
Power of Attorney or Guardianship papers. 

If there are any unusual circumstances in 
connection with any claim, a full explanation 
should be forwarded with the application for 
funeral donation. By so doing you may elim- 
inate much unnecessary correspondence and 
delay in the proper adjustment of the claim. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Teenagers Brainwashed About Unions 



In the next 5 years the U. S. labor 
force is expected to include 17,245,- 
000 people who are 14-24 years 
old. This will be more than one- 
fifth of the working population of 
1965. They can be expected to be 
an active, vocal 20% who will want 
things done in their own way for 
their own benefit. Today's high 
school students will constitute a ma- 
jority of this group. In an attempt 
to find out what this group is think- 
ing, Purdue University circulated a 
questionnaire to a nationally repre- 
sentative sample of high school 
students. 

The questions fell in three cate- 
gories. What kind of overall national 
employment picture do teenagers 
want for tomorrow? How do teen- 
agers feel about unions, business, 
and government control of indus- 
trial relations? What ideas and 
values will these teenagers of today 
bring to the labor market in 1965? 

The results of the study show 
that 58% of the teenagers quizzed 
want to be professional workers — 
such as doctors, writers, artists, en- 
gineers, teachers, nurses, preachers, 
entertainers or technicians. Only 
15% of the group want to go into 
business management in the sense 
of an owner or executive in a large 
business. Some 6.% want to farm. 
Eight percent want to be the owners 
of small businesses. The field of 
public employment — policemen, 
government workers, etc., attracts 
some 9%. Only 2% want to be 
production workers and 3% aspire 
to be white collar workers. 

The Purdue report points out that 
it is not surprising that so many 
teenagers wish to be professional 
specialists. Their families, schools 
and advertising exert considerable 
pressure in this direction. It is also 
obvious that many will be disap- 
pointed in their expectations. 
Although the proportion of profes- 
sional jobs is increasing, it is not 
expanding rapidly enough to accom- 
modate the 58% who aspire to that 
status. 

How much factual information 
do teenagers have about unions, 



business and industry? Members of 
labor unions ought to note carefully 
the results of this section of the poll. 
The findings of the Purdue study 
group make it obvious that Ameri- 
can teenagers have been "taken in" 
to a very large degree by the anti- 
labor campaigns of the last 10 
years. 

Many of the half-truths, insinua- 
tions and innuendoes circulated 
about labor during the past 10 years 
by irresponsible sections of the press 
have had their effect upon the teen- 
agers. Many of them seem to ac- 
cept without many questions the 
anti-labor bias. Note in the follow- 
ing chart how well business leaders 
come off in comparison to union 
leaders. The percentages are based 
upon a total of 100% as the maxi- 
mum of the teenagers questioned. 



Statement 



Most Most 
Business Union 
Leaders Leaders 



are responsible, prac- 
tical men 79% 60% 

are interested in the 
freedom and wel- 
fare of the indi- 
vidual 58% 47% 

have a great deal of 
wisdom and gen- 
eral knowledge 75% 64% 

are more interested 
in personal gain 
(money and/or 
power) than in 
the welfare of the 
public 60% 57% 

The report further shows that 
8 1 % of the teenagers questioned 
feel that most business leaders 
should be treated with respect while 
only 66% feel that the same respect 
should be accorded union leaders. 
One-third believe that "many" or 
"almost all" business leaders use 
illegal means of gaining power or 
money, but 41% think this about 
union leaders. 

It is also interesting to note that 
nearly 50% of the teenagers cov- 
ered by the poll think that news 
media — newspapers, radio, TV — 




622. 



sxstss- 



£$&•* 



"Pop says those are the 
foundation blocks — You 
gotta build from there!" 



favor neither business nor labor and 
do not "slant" union news one way 
or the other. Twenty-one percent 
think the news media favor unions, 
32% think business is favored. 

The Purdue report contains this 
notable comment: "Perhaps one 
reason that teenagers (and Con- 
gressmen?) are more severe on 
union leaders is that they think they 
should be better than business lead- 
ers. Two-thirds agree that an 
elected union official has a greater 
duty to be honest and respectable 
than an appointed business leader." 

In the final section the Purdue 
report points out that the essence of 
most problems in industrial relations 
is the distribution of power among 
business, labor and the government. 
Here the teenagers seem to feel that 
the government should have more 
power, unions should have less and 
that business has about the right 
amount. They are about evenly 
divided on whether or not many 
businesses unfairly discourage work- 
ers from forming a union and 30% 
say it is all right for a company to 
fire strikers when a union goes on 
strike. A little less than half of the 
students agree that the unions are 
a stronghold of intellectual freedom, 
but 61% say the idea of unionism 
is in fundamental agreement with 
the ideas of American democracy. 

(Editor's note: See editorial com- 
ment on Page 12). 



MAY, 1961 



19 



^ WmrtA 



t>U 




**l 




Every added skill that the housewife 
can acquire can make her home that 
much more attractive that much more 
inexpensively. So this month, let's 
spend a few minutes on suggestions 
for bringing an individual, custom 
look to your windows. 

Without being an expert seamstress, 
you can sew attractive and inexpensive 
curtains if you will take advantage of 
washable fabrics, fancy trimmings and 
new drapery hardware. 

After so many years of dull 
neutrality, decorative shades are 
among the newest and most popular 
window treatments. Made of drapery 
fabrics and trimmings, they are just 
as practical as their old-fashioned 
cream-colored predecessors but much 
prettier. They offer an advantage over 
curtains in that they require a mini- 
mum of fabric and thus are economi- 
cal to make. 

Three Fresh Ideas 

Among the many different styles are 
the softly shirred Austrian shade and 
the traditional roller shade dressed in 
a bright fabric. An innovation for use 
on a sun porch or breezeway is called 
the grommet shade. Here are sewing 
suggestions for these three types: 

The Austrian shade — Because of its 
soft shirring and scalloped hemline, 






the Austrian shade has a distinctive 
beauty of its own. While it recalls the 
elegance of the past, it is being used 
today in both modern and traditional 
decor. This treatment is especially 
effective for a long narrow window 
awkwardly placed in a room or hall, 
but it also can be used for a wide 
pictured window and even hung floor 
length if desired. A soft and pliable 
cotton fabric that drapes and shirrs 
easily is a wise choice. 

Valuable Time-Saver 

A new shirring tape, designed for 
use by the homemaker in sewing 
Austrian shades, saves valuable time. 
The flat tape comes with two woven 
cords that can be pulled for fullness 
and released for ease in laundering. 
Small plastic rings are attached at 
intervals for cords to go through, so 
the shades may be raised or lowered. 
To figure the amount of fabric you 
need for an Austrian shade: Allow 
two to three times the length of the 
finished shade. Measure the width of 
the shade plus three inches extra for 
outside hems and two to four inches 
extra for each scallop area. The more 
allowance, the deeper the scallops at 
the bottom edge. Scallop width can 
be from 10 to 15 inches. 



To cut strips and attach shirring 
tape: Cut each strip the desired length 
and tapered one and one-half inches 
narrower at the top than the bottom. 
Stitch strips together lengthwise with 
one-half inch seams. Press seams open. 
Baste and stitch shirring tape over the 
center of each seam. Turn one inch 
hem on outside of strips. Baste and 
stitch tape one inch from edge on each 
side. Be sure to knot shirring cords 
at each end before stitching. 

For a finished and elegant look, out- 
line the scalloped edges of your 
Austrian shade with a tasseled fringe. 
Be sure to choose a washable fringe so 
your shade will be entirely washable 
and easy to keep clean. 

Simple but Pretty 

The roller shade — A simple yet 
pretty way to add color to a room is 
with a roller shade. This treatment is 
especially suited for the kitchen, den 
or bath, and its eye-catching appeal 
depends almost entirely on the fabric 
and its trim. Unusual prints or bright 
solid colors, trimmed with a contrast- 
ing fringe or braid, are appropriate. 
If you select a lightweight cotton fab- 
ric, you may wish to give it added 
stiffness by gluing it to a ordinary 





Splashes of color in an imaginative cotton print perk up this 
kitchen. Colorful spice jars and sayings enliven the print used 
in the window shade and the shortie cafe curtain. Wallpaper 
tiles, designed to match the fabric, decorate the wall. Knotted 
fringe adds a finishing touch to the shades and curtain. 



For informal window dressing, cafe curtains remain the favorite 
of homemakers. They're easy to wash and iron and can be 
opened to let in light or close in privacy. Here, scalloped cafes 
are used to make two widely spaced single windows look like 
a generous picture window. Made in three sections, the center 
panels cover wall space between windows. White braid adds 
a decorative touch. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



window shade. However, a firmer 
fabric, such as canvas, sailcloth, denim 
or ticking can be easily sewn and 
attached to a roller. 

Follow these simple instructions: 
Measure the width and length you 
wish your shade to be. Hand sew one- 
inch hems and a one and one-half inch 
bottom hem, leaving sides open to in- 
sert the bottom rod. Hand sew a half 
inch hem at the top of shade and 
attach to roller with staple gun or 
small tacks. Be sure to keep fabric 
straight on roller, taut without stretch- 
ing. Attach the fringe of your choice. 
Insert narrow, inch-wide bottom rod 
and blind stitch ends. Add shade pull 
and roll fabric taut and even so it pulls 
smoothly. 

The grommet shade — This is a 
practical and inexpensive idea for 
dressing up the windows of a porch or 
breezeway. Choose a firm, closely 
woven fabric such as sailcloth. Make 
a straight roller-type shade the width 
and length of your window. Space 
pairs of grommets (one inch apart, 
one above the other) at one foot 
intervals down the sides of the shade. 
Attach hooks at the top of the win- 
dows, one on each side, and hook 
shades at different levels to admit air 
and light by fitting grommets over 
hooks. Trim bottom edge with con- 
trasting fringe. The layer on layer of 
draped goods give an interesting dif- 
ferent look to your window. 

Although decorative shades are 




Here's a perfect solution for curtaining a 
long narrow window, awkwardly placed 
at the end of the hall or in a corner by 
itself. A contemporary black and white 
print, edged with gold fringe and tassels 
lends itself to the soft shirring of the 
Austrian shade. Austrian shades are easy 
to make with shirring tape, available with 
complete instructions at a drapery trim- 
ming department. 




w 







This distinctive window treatment combines an unusual Austrian cornice with pinch- 
pleated cafe curtains. Tasseled fringe is used for accent. The shiny brass curtain 
rod adds to the over-all decorative effect. Shirring the Austrian cornice is made with 
special tape and can be released for laundering. 



gaining in popularity with the home- 
maker, cafe curtains remain a favorite 
informal window treatment. Drapery 
departments offer a variety of items 
that simplify the job of making and 
hanging these curtains. 

For instance, look for a new cotton 
braid designed to be used as a cafe 
heading with woven-in looks for hang- 
ing. Simply stitch the heading to the 
top of the curtains and slip your rod 
through the loops. For added trim, 
sew several rows of flat matching braid 
minus the loops to the bottom of the 
curtain. 

A fiat tape, three inches wide, which 
can be stitched to either a plain or 
scalloped heading, makes it easy to 
pinch pleat cafe curtains. The tape 
has finished edges and woven in 
pockets in which hooks or ring pleaters 
can be inserted. It will retain its firm- 
ness through many washings. 

Valuable Shortcut 

If you want to use brass rings for 
hanging your cafe curtains, it's no 
longer necessary to spend hours tack- 
ing them to the heading. You can buy 
rings which clip easily onto a scalloped 
or plain heading, or pleating hooks 
which already have brass rings at- 
tached. 

So you see, the possibilities are 
limitless once you start applying your 



imagination and a bit of know-how. 
For very little cost, your home can be 
curtained to a queen's taste. 




3 easy v/ays to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedfaor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores up to 5 times faster in any wood, at any 
angle. Sizes 'A" to 1", $.75 each. Sizes \Ve" to 
P/ 2 ", SK 25 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /$" to 
3". Only $4.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, s / 6 " to 1 %". Only $3.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1 " holes through 1 " wood. Sizes ^U" to 
1 Vi". As low as $1.05 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 



£ 



IRWIN Wi, ir n - 

every bit as good as the name 



MAY, 1961 



21 





. 



L. U. NO. 1, CHICAGO, ILL. 
Aikens, C. J. 
Anderson, Anton 
Behr, Frank J. 
Branson, E. R. 
Burke, Thomas F. 
Callan, Louis 
Contore, John J. 
Ehardt, John 
Harland, Bert 
Hugenschmidt, A. 
Hughes, Patrick 
Lasonder, Anton J. 
Marten, Edward F. 
Moran, James 
Rashorn, Paul 
Reichert, Theodore J. 
Schaefer, Charles 
Wojtarowicz, John 

L. U. NO. 4, DAVENPORT, IOWA 
Jahns, Herman P. 

L. U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 
McGill, Charles C. 
Nelke, Carl 
Stalter, Elmer 

L. U. NO. 16, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Fitzgibbons, Maurice 
Monroe, James H. 
Murphy, Charles J. 
Sams, Carl 

L. U. NO. 19, DETROIT, MICH. 

Boelter, Elmer 
Nicholas, Duschan 
Pearce, William A. 

L. U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 
Brown, Alexander 
Martin, Peter L. 
Thomas, Ralph 

L. U. NO. 50, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Ford, M. K. 
Fuller, S. Bruce 

L. U. NO. 72, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Daniels, Earl 
Knapp, Louis 

L. U. NO. 79, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Beyerle, Chris W. 
Carlson, Idoff 
Desiderio, Anthony 
Raulinatis, Charles 
Sammis, Isaac 

L. U. NO. 90, EVANSVILLE, IND. 
Stephan, John B. 

L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MD. 
Farley, Bernard H. 
McFarland, William E. 
Seylar, George W. 
Thompson, Andrew 

L. U. NO. 117, ALBANY, N. Y. 
Ford, Marc 
Gietl, Joseph 
Molitor, Joseph J. 

L. U. NO. 143, CANTON, OHIO 
Plaskett, Ezra 
Schoeppner, Joseph 

L. U. NO. 144, MACON, GA. 
Adair, Earl E. 
Kennedy, H. E. 
Tompkins, M. O. 



L. 0. NO. 188, YONKERS, N. Y. 

Bowker, Robert 

L. U. NO. 239, EASTON, PA. 
Stout, Raymond H. 

L. U. NO. 249, KINGSTON, ONT. 
Beevers, George P. 
McFarland, J. W. 

L. U. NO. 257, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Leino, John 

L. U. NO. 299, UNION CITY, N. J. 
Anderson, Axel 
Berke, August 
Larsen, Christ 
Roupenian, Robert 
Tully, James 
Zambrano, Nicolas 

L. U. NO. 301, NEWBURGH, N. Y. 
Miller, Hazelton 

L U. NO. 325, PATERSON, N. J. 
DeWitt, Peter 
Glassman, Morris 
Hall, William 
Matthews, James 
Van Assen, Gustav 

L. U. NO. 366, BRONX, N. Y. 
Linderholm, Charles 
Rosenblum, Jacob 
Schonewald, William 

L. U. NO. 385, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Beldegrun, Jacob 

L. U. NO. 465, ARDMORE, PA. 
LaFond, Edwin P. 

L. U. NO. 488, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Chartrand, Peter 
Lehtinen, Oscar 
McGlone, Joseph 
Mensch, Henry P. 
Nelson, Paul 
Paulson, Axel 

L. U. NO. 558, ELMHURST, ILL. 

Hughes, James 
Schweppe, Edwin 

L. U. NO. 608, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Hubbard. Raymond 
Kelly, John J. 
Munson, Lewis 
Smith, Alexander 

L. U. NO. 621, BANGOR, ME. 
Pattee, Harry W. 

L. U. NO. 696, TAMPA, FLA. 
Deane, Howard A. 
Matt ox. Horace R. 
Miller, H. J. 

L. U. NO. 714, OLATHE, KANS. 
Large, Charles W. 
McGavran, Emmitt H. 

L. U. NO. 764, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Allen, Thomas W. 
Bissell, S. A. 
Cheek, Fred 
McCrary, J. W. 
Rogers, D. C. 



L. U. NO. 787, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Johannesen, Johannes 

L. U. NO. 795, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Schutz, Frank J. 

L. U. NO. 810, WAKEFIELD, R. I. 

Wells, Arthur Ray 

L. U. NO. 839, DES PLAINES, ILL. 

Wallace, Kenneth 

L. U. NO. 844, RESEDA, CAL. 

Oberg, Ralph 

L. U. NO. 915, DETROIT, MICH. 

Adams, Jay 
Bortz, Joseph 
Curtis, Charles 
Ladutko, John 
Morosan, Nicolai 
Negus, Ernest 
Nickollof, Herman 
Pidsosny, Russell 
Schaible, Louis 
Smith, Robert T. 
Van Coile, Ernest 
Westerman, Rudolf 

L. U. NO. 978, SPRINGFIELD, M0. 
Krehmeier, Emmett E. 
Mondy, Fred 
Robinson, Lane 

L. U. NO. 1016, ROME, N. Y. 
Koski, Frank J. 

L. U. NO. 1089, PHOENIX. ARIZ. 
Carpenter, Edwin E. 
Dalton, John J. 
Gaillard, Martin 
Hudson, James R. 
Martin, Jess B. 
Robbins, Irving 

L. U. NO. 1098, BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Porter, A. E. 

L. U. NO. 1138, TOLEDO, OHIO 
Aldrich, Orville 
Heffelbower, Gerald 
Ruehle, Alfred 

L. U. NO. 1154, ALGONAC, MICH. 
Simons, Henry C. 

L. U. NO. 1274, DECATUR, ALA. 
Ramey, Ray 

L. U. NO. 1289, SEATTLE, WASH. 
Raines, Floyd G. 

L. U. NO. 1323, MONTEREY, CALIF. 
Wright, George T. 

L. U. NO. 1325, EDMONTON, ALTA. 
Charkiw, Marko 
Curtis, William G. 
Farrell, Douglas 
Gordon, Thomas 
Melenchuk, Peter 
Norgren, Eric 
Rygalo, Harry 

L. U. NO. 1353, SANTA FE, N. MEX. 
Peabody, E. E. 



L. U. NO. 1367, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Pedersen, Christ 

L. U. NO. 1397, ROSLYN, N. Y. 

Vents, Edgar 

L. U. NO. 1423 CORPUS CHRISTI TEX. 

Rivers, A. P. 
Simonds, E. E. Sr. 

L. U. NO. 1452, DETROIT, MICH. 
Egnash, Frank 
Krezenski, Michael 
Murray, Clyde 
Palmburg, Ernest 
Schock, Arthur 
Serra, Peter 

L. U. NO. 1456, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Ahlbom, Ellis 
Bruce, Jean 
Gundersen, Ole 
Johnson, John F. 
Ostergard, Sigfrid 

L. U. NO. 1478, RED0ND0 BEACH, CAL. 

Bowden, Hobart M. 

Ford, Matt 

Preshaw, William J. T. 

L. U. NO. 1537, FALLS CITY, NEB. 

Kjeldsen, Niels 

L. U. NO. 1570, MARYSVILLE, CAL. 
Turney, Victor V. 

L. U. NO. 1725, DAYTONA BEACH, FLA. 
Graham, Middleton 
Hill, Clarence E. 

L. U. NO. 1752, POMONA, CAL. 
Gordon, Harold E. 
Snider, Earl S. 

L. U. NO. 1764, MARION, VA. 
Coulthard, R. G. 
Dolinger, M. C. 
Hash, Virgil 
Hutton, Mirt 
Hutton, Murphy 
Mathena, Fred 
Murray, John 
Perkins. Burhman 
Petty, Ray 
Stump, John 
Sullivan, Winfield 
Trail, John Garlan 

L. U. NO. 1772, HICKSVILLE, N. Y. 
Bode, George 
Jaeger, Carl 
Mazurkewitz, Alex 
Szabo, Joseph 

L. U. NO. 1967, HATO REY, P. R. 

Gonzalez, Fermin Rivera 

L. U. NO. 1976, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Barber, Laurence 
Dondick, Irving 
Gonzales, Frank 
Zlotnick, Victor 

L. U. NO. 2164, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Carlson, Gunnar 

L. U. NO. 2695, LOYALTON, CAL. 
Snider, Benjamin W. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



A Brave Man In Gray Writes 

Editor's Note — During this period in which we are commemorating the centennial of the outbreak of 
the Civil War many writers are attempting to recapture something of the tragedy, suffering and misery 
of the long, bloody conflict. Who can do it better than one who was there? The following letter was 
written by Johnnie Wickersham, who was a captain in the Confederate Army at the age of 15. Part 
of the last days of the war, when the Confederacy was dying, was described many years later by Cap- 
tain Wickersham in a letter to his grandson. We reprint this letter with the permission of the MON- 
SANTO MAGAZINE, where it first appeared in December 1960. 



NEAR Meridian, Miss., the remnant of our once 
great army, in battle array, started on its last 
race with death, its ranks reduced over 80 per cent 
during the past year by the ravages of war. Physically 
unfit, yet still undaunted, undiscouraged, brave unto 
death. 

General Lee had surrendered, but as yet we were 
unaware of this, and the rumors which floated through 
our command were to the effect that General Lee had 
won a great victory; that Major General Kirby Smith, 
with a large army, was making forced marches to get 
in the enemy's rear, and so we fought on. The long and 
weary marches through the days and nights of that last 
retreat are to me the most cruel pages of the history of 
our war. The enemy, like bloodhounds, were ever at our 
throats, overwhelming us completely by the number of 
their forces. Curtis, my grandson, some day, when you 
are older, you will hunt the deer, and the hounds will 
trail the wounded by their blood. So it was with us. In 
the wake of our army, not only was our trail marked 
with blood of the dead and wounded, but by the bodies 
of the sick and exhausted men who could withstand no 
longer and so fell by the wayside. We kept only our 
guns and ammunition, and were compelled to aban- 
don all baggage and commissary wagons. Still we fought 
on. We were told that Major General Kirby Smith 
would on the morrow get in the enemy's rear, and so 
capture the entire army, and the next day it would still 
be "tomorrow," but that "tomorrow" never came. They 
had killed the horses and captured all our artillery with 
the exception of six guns. Then, the third day before 
the last, a large force suddenly charged our weakened 
left flank, killed the remaining horses and gunners and 




General Robert E. Lee — soldiers wept when he surrendered. 
MAY, 1961 



took from us those guns, but not for long. You cannot 
realize, nor can I picture to you, the diabolical frenzy 
of man when driven to desperation. We were starving, 
exhausted, haunted, sick, and the future was a blank, 
holding out no promise to us. We had been hounded 
and driven until death had lost its terrors and rather 
stood to us for rest from all this strife and bloodshed. 

A shout filled the air, not the famous rebel yell that 
is mentioned in all history, but one that seemingly came 
from the throats of demons in their last death struggle. 
It was so sudden, so appalling, so desperate, it struck 
terror to the Federals, and like maniacs, we were at 
their throats in hand-to-hand conflict. We succeeded in 
driving them back and recaptured our beloved guns. 

Those tired, sick and barefoot men pulled the guns 
by means of ropes through the twelve miles, ankle deep 
in bog and mire, until we came to some old breastworks 
General Beauregard had built during the early years 
of the war. 

Now, here is a picture which can be erased only by 
death. On a hill to our right the enemy had planted a 
battery and the next morning began to pour grape shot 
into our thin ranks while solid lines advanced in our 
front. We repulsed them. At nine o'clock the battery on 
the hill ceased firing and there ensued a calm. The 
men looked into each other's faces with wonder and 
amazement. One man said, "Boys. Kirby Smith has 
gotten in their rear, and they are in full retreat." All 
that afternoon not a shot was fired, and how long that 
night seemed to those men, watchful and sleepless. The 
only sound to be heard was the steady tramp of the 
sentinel. We could sleep under the roar of artillery and 
rattle of musketry, but what meant this deathly still- 
ness? Unconsciously the men spoke in whispers, and the 
question that passed from lip to lip was, "What does it 
mean?" 

It seems to me too pitiful to write that on that day 
those of our regiment answering for duty numbered 
much less than a company. "Color bearers ten paces to 
the front. About face." These were the colonel's orders, 
and his next, "Present arms." Stopping a moment he 
looked at us and then slowly turned and rode down the 
hill. The colonel checked his horse at some distance 
and beckoned the bugler to approach. A moment later 
the boy came running back, and with tears streaming 
down his face, said, "Boys, the Colonel says it's all over. 
You will have to ground arms." 

No tongue or pen can ever describe this scene. Our 
eyes involuntarily turned in the direction of that be- 
loved battle flag which had never known dishonor or 
disgrace, and we thought of the many, many heroes 
who had died under it, and with one accord we strug- 
gled to obtain a scrap of it. I cannot write more. 

The war was over, and we had lost. God only knows 
the price we paid. 



23 












This month's progress report shows both 
interior and exterior scenes of the new 
headquarters building in Washington, D. C. 
Above is shown the master control board 
and at left a detail of the board which 
registers a whole complex of climatic and 
other data. The new building will have 
the most up-to-date control system yet 
developed. At left is a section of the un- 
finished cafeteria facility. Below at left is 
a view of a new type Venetian blind and 
in center is one of the many striking panel 
sections. At lower right is a section of the 
roof with new type spotlights. 






24 



THE CARPENTER 




By FRED GOETZ 



Angler — Distaff Style 

Shades of the forthcoming "sunny 
fishing" season, it's getting close to the 
opening of spring angling around this 
nation's far flung, fishing acres. 

To set the stage for such a beginning 
we hope to promote some piscatorial 
palpitations with photos and matching 
comments of days out fishing with the 
angling carpenter and his family. 

Miss Fern Turpin, whose dad is a 
carpenter, a member of Dallas, Texas 
local, is an avid southern anglerette. 
She's shown here with a nice catch of 
sand bass taken off the barge "Grape- 



Proud Angler's Catch 




L 



vine." To the left of Miss Turpin is 
her niece, Elaine Turpin, age 12, also 
a rabid fishergal. 

Fern used a Heddon rod, Johnson 
spincast reel, six-pound test line and 
Shyster lures. Her favorite barge is 
located 28 miles north of Dallas off 
Highway 77. This is a lucrative spot, 
according to her, and few Sundays go 
by that she will take home less than 
50 sand bass with a few crappie mixed 
in. 

Hot spots in her stretch 'o the river 
are the Falcom Dam Reservoir on the 
Rio Grande and Black and Caddo lake 
in Louisiana. 




Scott Hamel of Canonsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, is seventeen years old now. 
He's the son of Elmer Hamel, a mem- 
ber of Local 230 out of Pittsburgh. 

He's caught a lot of fish in the last 
five years but none will ever replace 
in his mind the memory of the first 
sizeable trout he took — a 16-inch lake 
trout five years ago from the waters 
of French creek out of Ontario, 
Canada. 

Here's a pic of young Scott saunter- 
ing off the dock with the plump laker. 

It's a Family Affair 

Carl Hardwick of 8954 Luella Ave- 
nue, Chicago 17, Illinois, a member 
of the Carpenter's Union Local 199, 
enjoys the angling pastime and has 




passed this along to his son, Kenneth. 

Here's a look at Carl and Ken re- 
turning from a late-evening "go" at 
Cass lake in Minnesota. They each 
accounted for three lunker-size great 
northerns, all duped with small 
suckers. 

The Hardwicks have fished Cass for 
six years now and from what we hear 
they always come home with a good 
catch of northerns and walleyes. 

Fine Canadian Trip 

Bob Hinzman of 1886 Ray's Lane, 
Covington, Kentucky, a member of 
Local 712, waits for the day that he 
will be able to make another trip like 
the one he and his friends made sev- 
eral years ago. 

They, and their canoes and camp- 
ing gear, were flown in to a place 
called "Ourprivate Lake" (wonder 
where that could be) across the 
Minnesota border into Canada. The 
flight took one hour from Ely, 
Minnesota. They fished the lake for 
seven days and it took them seven 
days to paddle back to civilization on 




the "NoName" (another strange body 
of water) river. 

It was hard to sink the barb be- 
cause so many lunkers in the lake 
viewed for the lure that it was diffi- 
cult to set a hook in one . . . poor 
fish, poor fisherman. 

Here's a pic of Bob and the other 
fisherfolk working their way down the 
creek, a couple days out of Ely. 

Check Your Line 

As the strength of a chain is no 
greater than its weakest link, likewise 
the strength of your fishing line is no 
greater than its strength at the weakest 
point. So, occasionally, "look to your 
line," checking it for developed nicks 
and abrasions. 



MAY, 1961 



25 




Longer Life for Steel Tape 

You can lengthen the life of your 
steel tape and have more money for 
other tools by placing a strip of trans- 
parent tape over the first twenty-four 





' \ 


K- TRM5PAREHT TAPE- ■ 1 


-, \ 

© 


fMppr'pmri'TjTfVT 



inches of the tape, thus eliminating any 

rubbing off of the marks. 
Arthur Charters 
(L. U. 769, Pasadena) 
2530 San Clemente Ave. 
Alhambra, Calif. 



Hand and Saw Saver 

Keep hand saws sharp longer by 
installing rubber stops in the bottom 
of tool boxes. This is better than 
having the teeth facing up because 




Eft STOPS 



there is less chance of being scratched 
every time you reach in your box for 
a tool. 

John Kajil 

Box 295 

Campbell River 

British Columbia, Canada 



THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and 
published. Send along your pet trick 
for making a job easier. It can earn 
you five dollars and the gratitude of 
your fellow members. Include a rough 
sketch from which we can make a 
drawing. When the same idea is sub- 
mitted by more than one reader, the 
letter bearing the earliest postmark 
will be awarded the check. 

Place saw in opening between planks, 
with back of saw (not the teeth) to- 
wards the tin. Hold a wooden block 
under the planks against the saw teeth, 
push down on saw back and follow 
up with the wood block. I have used 
this method on both heavy and light- 
weight tin and always have success in 
cutting the tin straight and neatly. 

Elmer Davis 

(L. U. 1488) 

1800 River Street 

Merrill, Wise. 

Easy-Out Nails 

Here's an idea that may be of use 
to some of your readers. 

File a notch in one of the claws 



, NOTCH 



Sawing Tin 



To cut tin with a hand saw: Place 
two planks side by side on sawhorses, 
leaving an opening between them just 
the width of the saw blade. Place the 
tin on the planks; it cannot bind down. 



WOSM> BLOCK 

•Miorti or ACA/*sr saw 



PENCIL. LME 

ON TIN 




26 




of your hammer to pull out hard-to- 
get-at nails in tight corners, like toe 
nails in a stud, etc. 

John Kajil 

Box 295 

Campbell River 

British Columbia, Canada 



YOU can't afford to miss 

THE UNION LABEL Y/J- / 

Wis 

EJKHEEM 




Baa 



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THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p.. 498 il.. 
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Name_ 



Address. 
City 



.State. 




Silver Anniversary 



UNION 



Brother Kelly Honored 




From left to right — Business Representative Robert P. Argentine, President David 
Brown, Ret. Former General Executive Board Member William J. Kelly (62 years a 
member) and the Second General Vice-President O. Wm. Blaier awarding the 60 
year button. They attended 75th "birthday party at the Pittsburgh Hilton. 



Earlier this year the members and 
friends of Local 142, Pittsburgh, met 
at a dinner in the Pittsburgh Hilton 
Hotel to celebrate the Local's 75th 
birthday. It was on February 11, 1886 
that 17 hardy carpenters banded to- 
gether to try to improve their working 



conditions. In those days they made 
from $1.75 to $2.75 for a 10 to 12- 
hour working day. Local 142 had the 
additional distinction that General Sec- 
retary Peter McGuire, the founder of 
Labor Day, presented the Charter to 
the founders. 



Utah Local Honors Retired Officers 




Local 1984, Magna, Utah, recently 
honored its retired officers and marked 
the 43rd anniversary of its local char- 
ter. 

Brother Henry Meng joined the 
Local 1984 in 1918. He was elected 
President in November 1922 and 
served the Local in that office until 
1960. For 43 years he gave active, 
loyal support to the Brotherhood. 

Brother George Lamb has been a 



member of Local 1984 since 1922. 
He was elected Financial Secretary 
and Treasurer in May, 1923 and held 
that position until July, 1960. He gave 
many hours of conscientious service to 
union affairs. 

Brother Joseph Taylor joined Local 
1984 in 1946 and was appointed Re- 
cording Secretary in 1948. He too re- 
tired in July 1960. He was cited at the 
dinner for his faithful service. 




In the above picture George Tem- 
pleton, left, receives his 25 year mem- 
bership pin from Business Agent Carl 
Trotta of Local 353, Lynbrook, L. I., 
New York. Brother Templeton is 
Business Agent of Local 950, Lyn- 
brook. 

At the same ceremony Brothers Joe 
Schmidtt, Joe Noble, Harold Harder, 
John Phillips. Hjalmer Helin, Lars 
Jacobsen, Carl Johnson, Wally Schwan 
and Sigurd Torgeson received their 
25-year pins. 



MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 
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Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Guaranteed — made of 
nickel plated steel. 

Postpaid (cash with order) or C.O.D. <f 1 O AC 
plus postage; only «p I Z. 7.) 




ELIASON TOOL 
COMPANY 

6944 Pillsbury Ave., So. 
Minneapolis 23, Minnesota 



MAY, 1961 



27 



Ralph Chaplin, Veteran 
Editor Dies in West 

On March 22, 1961 Ralph Chaplin 
died in Tacoma, Wash. His name in- 
vokes poignant, sometimes bitter 
memories for the older members of 
American unions. He was a man who 
had served the cause of labor from the 
early days of this century and he had 
suffered for his beliefs. 

Child of the Chicago of Haymarket, 
the Pullman Strike and the gentle 
Socialism of Eugene Debs, Ralph 
Chaplin in early manhood found the 
hope and brotherhood he sought in 
the Industrial Workers of the World. 
As Editor of Solidarity during World 
War I he opposed the war and was 
ultimately sentenced to serve 20 years 
in Leavenworth Prison. In 1923 he 
was released by Presidential amnesty 
and returned to the cause of industrial 
unionism, writing and speaking for 
his fellow workers still in prison. He 
edited the Industrial Worker during 
the dark, lean Depression years. When 
the lonely men of the sea and the 
waterfront found solidarity in the 
Maritime Federation of the Pacific 
Coast in the 30s he championed their 
need as the Editor of the Voice of 
the Federation. During the 40s he 
fought for strong unionism as the 
Editor of the Tacoma Labor Advocate. 

Editors' Note — We are grateful to 
Mr. Ottilie Markholt, Tacoma, Wash., 
for the above material. 

St. Louis Honors Four 

Four brothers who were what might 
be termed "institutions" in Local 1596, 
St. Louis, Mo., were honored at a 
testimonial dinner given by Local 
1596. 

They are Robert S. Saunders, R. J. 
Burke, Harry Walling and Albert 
Wind. All have been active in the 
Brotherhood; all have held various 
offices in the Local and District 



Blaier Honors Volunteers 





Brother George Page, Local 155, Plainfield, N. J.; Police Chief Andrew Phillips and 
Business Representative Fred J. Nusbaum check the plans for the PAL Youth Build- 
ing in South Plainfield, N. J. Local 155 has been honored for the volunteer labor 
contributed to this project. 



In March, Local 155, Plainfield, 
N. J., celebrated the 75th year of its 
Charter with a dinner dance at Arbor 
Inn. Over 300 members and guests 
attended. 

Second General Vice-President O. 
William Blaier was the speaker. 

Among the special guests were Mr. 
William Shaffer, President of the 
Plainfield Building Trades, who was 
a special organizer many years ago for 
Local 155 and Mrs. Harold Hansen, 
the widow of the former Business 
Representative of the Local. 

Local 155 received two civic 
awards as birthday presents. The 



Plainfield Rescue Squad expressed its 
gratitude to Local 155 for the dona- 
tion of labor in connection with the 
construction of their new $100,000 
headquarters. The second award came 
from the Police Athletic League of 
South Plainfield for Local 155's 
donated labor in the construction of 
the first PAL Youth Building in New 
Jersey. 

Awards for continuous memberships 
were made to Brothers Gilbert Paoli, 
Albert Nelson, and Clarence Spangin- 
berg for 50 years; James McGauley, 
forty-five years; Homer Gross and 
John Massaker, forty years. 



Council; and all are master carpenters. 
The four are in the front row below. 
Left to right, Walling, Saunders, Wind 
and Burke. Standing back of them, 
left to right are Harold Cheeseman, 
General Office Representative; Mike 



. up 












1 : " 












-.) 










\ 


- i^S ^^ * 


jt 


-■Ml , Oi 



Heilich, President of Local 1596; 
Ollie W. Longhorst, Business Repre- 
sentative and member of Local 1596; 
D. Richard Adams, Business Manager, 
Carpenters District Council; E. C. 
Meinert, Secretary-Treasurer, Carpen- 
ters District Council; Norman Barth, 
Recording Secretary, Local 1596; 
Aaron Turnbull, Local 1596 Warden 
and J. O. Mack, member of the Gen- 
eral Executive Board, 6th District. 

OOPS! 

A recent issue of The Carpenter 
reported the story of the 50th Anni- 
versary of Local 1128, LaG range, 111. 
Somehow we left out the name of 
Brother Edward S. Wallace, president 
of Local 1 128. It was a mistake we 
should not have made. We apologize. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Dream Comes True 

(Continued from page 5) 

of reservoir it would have been neces- 
sary to build. 

The solution was found by placing 
the reservoir intakes at 510 feet above 
sea level and the floor nearly 100 feet 
higher. The pumps themselves are to 
be above the intakes at elevation 550. 
The high water level in the reservoir 
will be 655 feet above sea level. 

It is interesting to see that the 
pumps are reversible. When the water 
is being pumped into the reservoir 
they will be pumps. When the water 
is flowing out they will act as turbines. 

The electric motors powering the 
pumps can be reversed to operate as 
generators when the water is flowing 
out of the reservoir. 

When completed the Pump-Generat- 
ing Plant will have 12 motor-genera- 
tors connected to 12 hydraulic pump- 
turbines. Each electrical unit is rated 
at 37,500 horsepower as a motor and 
20,000 kilowatts as a generator, 
operating at 112.5 revolutions a 
minute under both conditions. 

Each hydraulic unit is rated to 
pump 3,400 cubic feet per second of 
water at 85 feet net head as a pump 
and to develop 28,000 horsepower at 
75 feet net ahead as a turbine. The 
12 pumps will move water into the 
reservoir at a rate of 305,220 gallons 
a second or 91.5 million gallons per 
hour. In 18 hours the reservoir can 
be filled completely. 

The Niagara Falls Gazette took the 
full measure of this magnificent project 
in an editorial which reads in part . . . 
"The new generators are beginning to 
spin at a time of some economic trou- 
ble in Niagara Falls and vicinity. Un- 
employment has reached disturbing 
levels, industrial production is at a 
low point. The pattern of industrial 
development is changing . . . The vast 
reservoir of electrical energy being 
developed at Niagara Falls should be 
an invaluable help in our efforts to 
win the economic battle. We will be 
in a uniquely favorable position in a 
nation and a world that can't develop 
sources of energy fast enough to meet 
the demand. It is estimated that the 
production of electric energy will have 
to be expanded 10 times in the next 40 
years. 

"This is the time when Niagarans 
might well translate President Ken- 
nedy's words into local terms, 'Don't 
ask what Niagara can do for you, 
ask what you can do for Niagara.' " 



Proud of Charter 




These men have been honored by 
Local 1480, Boulder, Colo., for their 
many years of membership in the 
Brotherhood. Seated at the left are 
Thomas Wold and Oscar Anderson, 
who have been members of the Car- 
penters for 51 and 50 years respec- 
tively. They are holding the Charter 



which was issued in 1917. Others, 
left to right, are Ralph Eck, Henry 
Martin, Ross Stigler and Melvin West. 
Standing, left to right, are John Styles, 
Leslie Bruce, Edgar Barr, Ralph 
Tooker and John Osborne. All have 
been members over 25 years. 



Four Kentucky 'Colonels' 



r IF' 




Four retired members of Local 
2516, Louisville, Ky., are seen here 
receiving gold wrist watches inscribed 
with their years of service. Standing 
are Node Skeeters, 40 years; and Elzie 
Brown, 30 years. Andrew Sayers, 
President of Local 2516, makes the 



presentation. Seated are John Reesse, 
49 years, and William Stewart, 40 
years. All four are charter members 
of the local which was established in 
1937 at the General Plywood Corp., 
Louisville. 



MAY, 1961 



29 




This column is devoted to introducing 
new developments in materials and prod- 
ucts to our members. The articles are 
presented merely to inform our readers, 
and their publication is not to be con- 
strued as an indorsement, since all the 
information is based on claims made by 
the makers. Those interested in obtain- 
ing further details regarding any product 
are requested to write to the company 
rather than to THE CARPENTER or 
the General Office. 



It Caps the Post 

Timber Engineering Company has 
announced the development of a new 
post cap for use with 4x4 wood 
members. 

Precision manufactured from 16 
gauge, zinc coated, corrosion resistant 
sheet steel, TECO's new post cap can 
be used either singly or in pairs when 
tying post or beam connections to- 




gether. The load requirement of the 
connection or the nature of the con- 
nection itself will determine whether 
one or two caps shall be used. Rec- 
tangular flanges, 1-11/16" x 2-5/8", 
provide for nailing to the beam. The 
placement of the cap can be reversed 
where desired. Furnished with each 
carton of TECO post caps are special 
9 gauge, 1-1/2" long nails. 

Further information can be obtained 
from Timber Engineering Co., 1319 
18th St., N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 



Hang It Straight 

A new-type picture hanger, designed 
to make it easier to hang pictures ac- 
curately and securely, has been intro- 
ducted by Star. 

Made of translucent plastic which 




y[Hiii;«i;fii k 'iMar*; 



Hi*. PlJttftC - Wit IK! Mil 



HOLD UP TO 50 L8S. EfiCH 




cannot rust or stain the wall, the new 
hanger has a large flat surface which 
provides ample area for gripping while 
hammering. A small star-indicator on 
the face of the hanger assures pin- 
point positioning of the nail and the 
picture. The picture wire rests directly 
on the nail rather than on the hanger. 

Hangers that support up to 100 lbs. 
are packaged 2 per card; 50 lbs., 3 
per card; 30 lbs., 5 per card; 15 lbs., 
6 per card. 

For further information, write Star, 
Mountainville, New York. 

Handy Knife 

A handy all-purpose saw-knife with 
exclusive design holds saw blade or 
knife blade for use as a keyhole saw 
or knife in the cutting of wood, metal 
or a variety of materials. It has a 
contoured 6Vs inch aluminum handle, 
is die-cast in two sections and has a 
storage area for 3 knife blades and a 
blade guard. A hole at the top makes 
it easy to hang the knife on a hook. 
It comes complete with wood-cutting 
blade, metal-cutting blade, three knife 
blades and blade guard — $1.59. 

For further information write to 
Dept. PD, Stanley Tools, 195 Lake 
Street, New Britain, Conn. 



What will it cost 



CHECK YOUR BUILDING PROJECT with reliable JOB COSTING figures 

1961 ARCHITECTS ESTIMATOR 



and COST REFERENCE GUIDE 



Supplies accurate preliminary unit building costs in con- 
venient form. Here are all the important facts and figures 
on current unit costs for every construction job large 
or small from excavation to final sub-contractor. All 

costs in this invaluable book include mark-up, overhead 
and profit. Regarded by architects, engineers, contractors 
and subs in the building industry as the most compre- 
hensive guide to normal profitable operation. Valued 
highly by industry and government in planning construc- 
tion projects. Special section devoted to foreign building 
costs. Revised yearly, new edition just published. 



PROFESSIONAL 
CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR 

A Labor & Material Calculator 




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30 



THE CARPENTER 



The Carpenter Gets a New Editor 




PETER E. TERZICK 

Now General Treasurer 

Since December I have been 
wearing two hats. I have been 
handling my new duties as General 
Treasurer of the Brotherhood as 



by Peter E. Terzick 



well as continuing to edit The 
Carpenter. On March 7 I was 
able to shift part of my load of 
responsibilities. On that day a new 
Editor was named by General 
President Maurice Hutcheson. He 
is James A. Eldridge and with this 
issue of The Carpenter he takes 
over. 

Mr. Eldridge, a native Hoosier, 
is a veteran newspaperman, foreign 
correspondent, writer and publicist. 
He has been a student of public 
affairs for more than 20 years. 

For some 18 years I have "lived" 
with The Carpenter. I have seen 
many changes come in our 80-year- 
old journal. I enjoyed the job. It 
had its share of problems, but it 
was a job that also brought me 
many friends and great satisfaction. 

Mr. Eldridge is already finding 
the Editor's office in Indianapolis 
a busy place and he goes to Wash- 




JIM ELDRIDGE 

New Editor 

ington each month to put The 
Carpenter "to bed" on the Merkle 
Press. 

Meantime, I'll be around to lend 
him a helping hand and to keep a 
brotherly eye on The Carpenter. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Belsaw Machinery Co., Kansas City, 
Mo 26 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, Minn. . 27 

Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III 31 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. .. 11 

Grip-Tite Mfg. Co., Inc., Winterset, 
la 15 

Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss 15 

Irwin Auger Bit Co., Wilmington, 0. . 21 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 11 

Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, N. Y. .. 11 

Chicago Technical College, Chicago, 
III 10 

Research Publishing Co., Los Angeles, 
Calif 30 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 26 



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MAY, 1961 



31 



IN CONCLUSION 




M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



One Old Motto 



Is Still Good 




Elmwood Cemetery, near Chicago, has a very large 
sign facing the 4-lane highway near its gates. The sign 
reads — "Drive Carefully. We Can Wait". This some- 
what shocking, abrupt billboard underscores one of the 
brutal facts of our time. Accidental deaths take thousands 
of lives in this country each year. 

The National Safety Council and allied organizations 
wage a relentless campaign of education and warning, but 
there are times it seems that it is to no avail. Month 
after month, the newspapers carry the sad, shocking 
stories of deaths in our homes, on the highways and on 
the jobs — deaths that a little more time and a little 
thought might well have prevented. We must not be- 
come discouraged. In fact, as our society becomes more 
technical and the intensity of modern life grows we 
must step up our efforts to restore "Safety First" as a 
national slogan. 

In this issue of THE CARPENTER there is a de- 
tailed report of a recent Safety Institute held in Wash- 
ington, D. C, as a part of the AFL-CIO safety program. 
I hope you will read carefully this article. The Brother- 
hood gave enthusiastic endorsement and support to this 
week-long study program. We did this because we want 
to spread throughout the entire Brotherhood a new 



awareness of the need to emphasize and re-emphasize 
"Safety First". 

This program is consistent with the traditions of the 
labor movement. Since its first days the labor movement 
has been concerned with the health and safety of its 
members. In fact, let us remember that in the early 
days of labor it was often the great need for safety that 
drove the workers to band together and organize to seek 
more adequate regulations, laws and equipment. It is part 
of labor's proud record that the fire-trap factories and 
many of the unsafe practices have vanished. But now 
we must again hammer home the need for personal 
caution. 

The very nature of the work sites where our Brother- 
hood works often brings hazards. Construction sites 
have their natural dangers. Sometimes familiarity breeds 
danger. It is the misstep, the misplaced tool and the 
careless backstep that can bring tragedy and disaster. 

In the recent Safety Institute all phases of this program 
were examined and studied. During the coming months 
we hope the effects of this will be felt by every Local. 
Let us hope that every Local will begin right now to 
re-emphasize the need for safety. 

Let us all keep in mind that this program concerns 
more than just safety on the job. This problem is with 
us every waking moment. It begins in the garage as we 
take the car out to drive to work. American highways 
are becoming a synonym for death. Every driver has the 
responsibility to do something about this blood bath. 
Each one of us has the responsibility to see to safety 
in the home. Our numerous electrical gadgets should 
be checked frequently. Habits of safety should be a 
routine part of the training of children. The coming 
Summer season brings its own dangers along with its 
pleasures. The weekend outing, the trip to the swimming 
pool, all suggest areas where caution and common sense 
should be exercised. 

It all comes down to taking a little more time and 
giving it just a bit more thought — on the job, in the 
home and on the road. It may make the difference of 
whether or not one of us becomes a statistic in America's 
tragic death toll. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




You build the future with Savings Bonds. 

Every Savings Bond you buy makes a big con- 
tribution to keeping our country strong ... so 
you can enjoy the things you're saving for. 



How to buy a 
down payment 
on a new home 
for $ 1.25 a day 



Saving for a new home, or any- 
thing else in fact, is simply a 
matter of spending less than you 
earn. Thousands of Americans 
have found an automatic way: 
the Payroll Savings Plan where 
they work. Through this plan 
your payroll clerk sets aside a 
certain amount each payday for 
U.S. Savings Bonds. As little as 
$1.25 a day buys a $50 Bond a 
month (cost $37.50). In 5 years 
you'll own Bonds worth $2,428.00 
—enough for a substantial down 
payment and closing costs. And 
you'll have become a homeowner 
with money that probably would 
have slipped through your fingers. 



Six nice things about 
U.S. Savings Bonds 



•You can save automatically on the 
Payroll Savings Plan, or buy Bonds 
at any Bank • You now earn 3%% 
to maturity, \ o % more than ever 
before • You invest without risk 
under a U.S. Government guaran- 
tee • Your Bonds are replaced free 
if lost or stolen • You can get your 
money with interest anytime you 
want it • You save more than 
money — you buy shares in a 
stronger America. 



sfl^lS Tfiis advertising is donated by 

I '• The Advertising Council and this magazine; 




Will he ever save the down payment? He'll be in his new home sooner 
than he thinks, if he saves something every payday. The effortless, 
automatic way is the Payroll Savings Plan for U.S. Savings Bonds. 




Guaranteed by Uncle Sam 
to grow. U.S. Savings Bonds 
are an absolutely riskless in- 
vestment. Each Bond has its 
growth values on the back — 
guaranteed in writing by the 
U.S. Government. 



m tu - ** 



ANNIVERSARY I 

ill I9GI if 
********** 



You save more than money 



v 



SoS? 



with U.S. Savings Bonds 



Don't let them 



call you 
LEFTY 



Shop accidents are a major 
cause of hand and arm ampu- 
tations. There's no need to 
give your right arm for your 
job. Remember the following 
general rules and obey them 
at all times. 

• Keep the work area around 
your machine neat and free of 
debris that can trip you. 

• If your machine has a guard, 
see that it is in good working 
order at all times. Never use 
the machine without it. 

• Never wear loose sleeves or 
baggy clothes around machin- 
ery. The results can be disas- 
trous. 

• Disconnect power source be- 
fore making repairs or adjust- 
ments on machine. 

• Do not allow anyone to dis- 
tract you while operating your 
machine. Conversation and 
safety do not mix any better 
than oil and water. 

• Forget your problems with 
the missus or girl friend until 
the quitting whistle blows. 

REMEMBER- YOU 
CAN'T GET AHEAD 
WITHOUT A HAND 




Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



JUNE 1961 



THE 



CARPENT 

FOUNDED 1881 






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i ANNIVERSARY % 

1941 * 

I9SI f 



CARPENTER 




THE COVER 

Yosemite National Park in California is named for the 
band of warlike Indians who once lived in the hidden 
valley. The clan was known as the Yosemites or "grizzly 
bears." On March 25, 1851, white men camped for the 
first time on the floor of the great valley. In June, 1885, 
the first party of tourists came to Yosemite. Through the 
years thousands traveled to behold its great beauty. In 
1890 the Federal government made it a National Park. 

Mirror Lake is but one of the many glories of nature 
that bring thousands to Yosemite each year. 





THE long winter is over. June in 
all its glory is with us. The world 
seems a better place to live. The lift 
many Americans feel just now is not 
all due to the weather. A good part 
of it was given to us by a young 
American named Commander Alan 
B. Shepard, Jr., of the U. S. Navy. 
This young man, our first Astronaut, 
has helped restore our faith in our- 
selves. The Russians had knocked a 
few pins from under us in outer space 
and we were all feeling a bit uneasy. 
But no more. Commander Shepard 
and his team of co-workers have not 
only made an impressive contribution 
to science but Shepard conducted him- 
self in such a way that our faith in 
ourselves has brightened considerably. 
He speaks modestly. He shares the 
glory with his team. Shepard displays 
tact and taste in answering the fre- 
quently pointless, sometimes inane 
and all too frequently tasteless ques- 
tion of the press. 

In an age of "supermen" Shepard 
is the "average guy" caught in a 
moment of history who rises to that 
moment. He renews America's faith 
in its own dream. It was the dream of 
Jefferson — that free men can rule 
themselves. 

If America and the free way of life 
can still produce young men like this 
one and if America can still produce 
charming, delightful, courageous 
women like Mrs. Shepard then "God 
is still in His heaven and all is right 
with the world". 



VOLUME LXXXI 



James A. Eldridge, Editor NO. 6 

JUNE. 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

3 Carpenters, Watch Your Eyes 

5 What Did President Kennedy Really Say? 

7 Your National Parks — People's Asset 

U "The Tacoma Story" — a Smash Success 

DEPARTMENTS 

2 Washington Roundup 

9 Canadian Section 

12 Editorials 

14 Battle of the Budget 

16 Progress Report 

17 Official Information 

19 In Memoriam 

20 Outdoor Meanderings 
22 Short Cuts 

24 What's New? 

26 Local News 

32 In Conclusion 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579-P should be sent lo THE 
CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Slreet. Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington 18, D. C. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United Stales and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20r in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



WASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



SAFETY NOTE This month THE CARPENTER is publishing on its back cover a safety 
poster designed to remind our members of the importance of the seat belt in motor 
cars. The National Safety Council has made an appeal through its Labor Division 
to all unions to bring to the attention of their members the seat belt problem. 
Studies in recent years have shown that the use of the seat belt greatly increases 
the probability of avoiding serious injury in the case of an accident. Since many 
injuries are caused through impact resulting from sudden stopping, any device which 
helps to hold the passenger and prevent his being catapulted through the windshield 
or out of the car, is certain to appeal to safety advocates. We commend the 
program of the Safety Council-we think it will save lives. 

A BREAK FOR MILLIONS This Labor Day will have special meaning for millions of 
American workers who will benefit from the provisions of the newly enacted amend- 
ments to the Fair Labor Standards Act — the wage-hour amendments which boost the 
floor of wages for the first time in several years. The new law will increase the 
wage level for many and over a period of time will bring the minimum from $1 per 
hour to $1.25. 

Of especial significance is the fact that the new law brings more than three 
million workers under the provisions of the wage-hour law. The effective date of 
the new law will be September 3. Thus the provisions of the amendments will come 
into force in the first pay period after Labor Day 1961. While we are gratified 
that millions will get a break in the new law, we are still acutely aware of the 
gaps in the statute and realize that millions more who deserve coverage are not 
protected. The real breakthrough of 1961 is a subject or some gratification and 
highly organized labor which is far above the minimum should realize that although 
organized labor is not directly affected by coverage, we all benefit. What helps 
raise the standards of even the lowest economic segments of labor helps all. 

CONSTRUCTION FRONTIER One of the major results of a Federal aid to education 
bill is bound to give a real boost to the construction industry. This stimulus will 
come, if the bill is passed, through assistance from the Federal Government, to the 
millions of school districts desperately in need of new physical plants. In many 
districts are schools which are literally bursting at the seams. The districts 
need new schools and, of course, many need funds for new teachers to help train the 
rapidly increasing school population. The construction trades stand to benefit 
immediately and directly from the provisions of the measure when and if it is 
finally enacted. Recent discussion of side issues in the school aid controversy 
have tended to obscure some of the direct benefits which the building trades will 
receive. We hope that controversies will not prevent the enactment of the 
necessary and useful school aid bill. 

FORGOTTEN CONSUMER Senator Maurine Neuberger, Dem., Ore., is taking an extra- 
ordinary interest in the problems of the consumer. She would like to see sort of a 
"watch dog" committee set up which would be a "Committee on Consumer Interests." 
This committee would keep an eye on the changing economic picture and would come 
to the rescue of the consumer — often a really forgotten man — through focussing the 
spotlight of publicity via investigations on offenders against the consumer's 
interest. 

We fear that Mrs. Neuberger's efforts will be sidetracked, but we are certain 
that they'll get the thanks of million of consumers who are carrying on a constant 
battle of the budget to make ends meet. We commend the efforts in behalf of the 
consumer and sincerely hope that these efforts act as a warning to the army of 
sharpsters who are always trying to take advantage of the consumer. 



THE CARPENTER 



Carpenters, 




afch Your Eyes! 



By 

James R. Gregg, O.D. 

EYESIGHT is your most valuable 
tool. Yet unless you have given 
it particular attention for your work, 
it may be far from adequate. This is 
so because carpenters have some very 
special seeing needs, seldom solved 
by ordinary methods. Strangely 
enough, this may be particularly so if 
you wear glasses. 

Carpentry work creates a big variety 
of visual demands — looking at many 
heights and distances, and in all kinds 
of seeing conditions. It can put un- 
usual burdens on eyes. There is the 
matter of seeing for safety too. And 
where closework is necessary, as it is 
on virtually every job. sight preserva- 
tion is particularly important. These 
are things you should know about, if 
you want to get the most from your 
eyes. 

Don't be fooled by 20/20 eyesight. 
Your distance vision should be clear 




Most common working distance is 18 to 
20 inches and downward vision must be 
accurate for work in this position. 



as you can get it because nearly all 
types of carpentry requires it. Yet 
20/20 eyesight is no guarantee you 
have the visual skills most essential in 
your work. You need eyes that can 
focus up close, quickly and accurately 
(to spot a guide mark), and they must 
aim precisely over a large area (to 
size up the whole job). Your eyes 
should coordinate together and have 
good muscle balance, and they must 
have plenty of focus power for near 
objects — without these your job would 
be difficult indeed. 

Check These Helpful Tips 

If you need to wear glasses for your 
work, here are some tips: Be sure the 
frames are wide enough to give you 
a good field of view, when moving 
around scaffolding, or in an area lit- 
tered with debris, you'll need all the 
side vision you can get. Frames 
should also fit well and have temples 
(earpieces) that hold them snugly in 
place, loose glasses will not give satis- 
factory service for your work. There 
is even eye hazard on your job (a 
hammer can send a nail spinning into 
a lens) and safety lenses are wise in- 
surance. These can be heat-treated 
glass, or plastic lenses. 

You should carefully consider the 
matter of tint in your lenses. Sun- 
glasses may be absolutely necesary on 
some outdoor jobs like working next 
to a bright wall or shiny windows. Be 
sure they are of good quality, and that 
you know when to use them, don't 
wear ones that are too dark. Lens 
coating can be another aid to your 
seeing comfort, it cuts reflections, 
makes the lenses seem clearer and can 
minimize the appearance of smudges 
or dust so prone to accumulate during 
a busy day. 

The most annoying problems start 
when the carpenter reaches the bifocal 
age. Everyone does, because the hu- 
man eye slowly loses its own auto- 
matic focusing ability. Near objects 
become blurry, and the closer or 
smaller they are, the harder it is to 



see them. The solution is simple as 
far as restoring clear vision for any 
desired near-seeing distance. But the 
matter is very complex for the car- 
penter's work because generally there 
is no single working distance but a 
variety of them. Perhaps even more 
significant, the need for near vision is 
not always downward in a customary 
"reading" position, but can be any- 
where from floor level to high over- 
head, and sometimes in awkward 
positions as well. 




The carpenter must see in all kinds of 
places where it is difficult to position 
head and eyes and his glasses must be 
made to suit his particular work. 

No one lens will thoroughly solve 
all a carpenter's seeing problems after 
he passes the mid-forties. At the very- 
beginning, "ordinary" bifocals may 
do, if his eyes can still focus some by 
themselves. "Reading glasses" (same 
focus all over the lenses) can provide 
good near vision, but they make every- 
thing more than a few feet away ap- 
pear blurred. This means taking 
glasses off to look up at any distance, 
or when walking around the job. If 
a distance correction is necessary also, 
two pairs of glasses must be used. 
Ultimately some sort of multifocal 
lens offers the most practical solution. 



JUNE, 1961 



even if no distance correction is re- 
quired, since they can eliminate the 
blurry distance seeing of the single 
vision near lens. 

Some acute problems for the car- 
penter arise from the fact that the 
range of vision (inward or outward) 
possible with any one lens power is 
not great enough for much of the 
work he performs. Rough construc- 
tion work is from 18 inches from the 
eyes to arm's length and may not 
require fine critical seeing, yet it can't 
be done with blurry vision. Finish 
carpentry is another thing, often as 
close as 14 to 16 inches and calling 
for the sharpest eyesight possible. 

Hold Out Your Arm 

But good vision is also essential out 
to arm's length, 24 to 30 inches and 
beyond on every job. Ordinary bi- 
focals are usually too strong for these 
jobs, and are often set so low in the 
lenses that awkward head tilting is 
necessary to see through them at eye 
level or above. 

What is the solution for carpenters 
of bifocal age? First of all it depends 
upon you and your work, and of 
course upon your eyes. You should 
measure your prime working dis- 
tances, determine how far it is from 
your eyes to the points where you 
must see, and also how high these 
areas are from the ground. Take this 
information with you when you have 
your vision examined. 

Here are some possible kinds of 
vocational lenses which could be used 
for your work: 

BIFOCALS: The bifocal part 
should be set high in the lens to mini- 
mize head tilt. It should be wide (it 
can cover the entire bottom of the 
lens) to provide a big near-vision 
area, if this is your primary need. 
The bifocal should be kept as "weak" 




Arm's length seeing is a common re- 
quirement; ordinary bifocals made for 
reading or extremely close work are 
generally too strong for this job. 



as possible to supply a good outward 
range (such lenses may be too weak 
for reading, or your favorite hobby). 
On the other hand, if you are bothered 
with the bifocal blur on the ground, 
a very small bifocal may be advisable. 
For this purpose, some carpenters 
prefer a ribbon segment bifocal with 
some space beneath the near-vision 
area with which to see the ground 
when walking. 

TRIFOCALS: Arm's length vision 
can be clear and easy through the 
middle section of the lens designed 
for that purpose. The top is for dis- 
tance seeing, the bottom strong enough 



for precise near vision, possibly to 
read a blueprint. Trifocals can be 
made in a variety of intermediate 
sizes, and widths. They provide the 
only really adequate answer for many 
of the seeing problems of carpenters 
for anything that must be viewed in 
a range of 24 to 28 inches, once the 
eye itself can't do that job. 

SPECIAL MULTIFOCALS: The 
top of bifocal lenses can be focused 
for arm's length seeing, the bottom 
for close work, and these are handy 
on many jobs. Sometimes upside- 
down bifocals are used. These have 
a little window of distance vision at 
the top with the rest of the lens for 
near work. Double bifocals are the 
ideal answer for whatever seeing dis- 
tance is desired. With them, working 
above eye-level is easy through a bi- 
focal at the top, the rest of the lens 
is an ordinary bifocal with sections 
for distance and near seeing. 

Why should you know these things 
about your visual problems? Why not 
leave it up to your refractionist? For 
one thing, he will need to know about 
your individual habits and seeing de- 
mands. But more than that, success- 
ful fitting of occupational needs de- 
pends greatly upon your understanding 
of the problems, and acceptance of a 
solution to them — generally by means 
of a lens prescription tailor-made for 
your unique seeing demands. 

Results? More comfortable seeing 
and a better day's work than when 
eyes struggle with glasses, like any of 
your tools, not adequately designed 
for your job. 



(Editor's Note: The author of the 
above article teaches at the Los An- 
geles College of Optometry and is past 
president of the California Optometry 
Association.) 




Seeing overhead is one of the carpenter's 
most difficult visual tasks; it may take a 
special kind of multifocal lens to produce 
sharp vision for it. 



Red Tape Tangles Depressed Areas Aid 



Aid to the depressed areas author- 
ized by Congress is getting tangled up 
in red tape before effective assistance 
can be given. The aid program has 
been assigned to the Department of 
Commerce, although Senator Paul H. 
Douglas, Dem., 111., had hoped for 
a separate agency. 

The new aid director, William L. 
Batt, Jr., will work in Commerce, but 
he must work with the Departments 
of Health, Education & Welfare, 



Agriculture, Labor, Interior, Housing 
& Home Finance Agency and the 
Small Business Administration. 

The complexities of working 
through several agencies was called by 
one Federal official "an administrative 
nightmare." First efforts will be made 
in mapping what the actual depressed 
areas are. These spots called "rede- 
velopment areas" are located where 
there are major pools of unemploy- 
ment — areas needing attention. 



THE CARPENTER 



What Did President Kennedy Really Say? 



By Jim Eldridge, Editor 

In the first 5 months of his admin- 
istration President Kennedy has sent 
some two dozen messages to the Con- 
gress proposing a variety of programs 
in the domestic and foreign relations 
field. One of the most controversial 
of his "New Frontier" proposals is the 
one in the field of medical care for 
the aged. By now, the debate has 
reached a fever pitch. The news- 
papers radio and TV are carrying mil- 
lions of words to the public both pro 
and con. But this discussion is, in the 
opinion of many, reflecting more heat 
than light. By now in fact, it seems 
hard to recall what the President 
really suggested. 

The battle lines are drawn about as 
usual. The American Medical Asso- 
ciation is opposed. That is no news. 
It was a safe bet they would be op- 
posed before the program was writ- 
ten. In all likelihood they didn't even 
bother to read the program in the 
headquarters of the AMA before they 
voted against it. This is consistent. 
As the Criterion, the official news- 
paper of the Catholic archdiocese of 
Indianapolis, pointed out in an edi- 
torial, "The AMA has a long history 
of opposition to social measures en- 
acted in the public interest. In the 
beginning stages especially, it has 
opposed the National Tuberculosis 
Act; even the reporting of tuberculosis 
cases to public authority. It has op- 
posed the Social Security Act ... it 
has been against Red Cross blood 
banks ... the Blue Cross, old age 
and unemployment insurance ... a 
recent article in the New York Times 
tells us it was even against compul- 
sory smallpox vaccination at one 
time ..." 

There doesn't seem to be too much 
argument about the need for a more 
adequate program. In its April 11th 
issue. Look Magazine points out in an 
article entitled "The Battle for Your 
Health Dollar," the financial and 
medical problems of men and women 
over 65 are obvious. More than half 
these 16 million Americans live on 
incomes of less than $20 per week. 
More than two-thirds get along on 
less than $40 per week. While strug- 
gling along on reduced incomes the 
aged face bigger doctor and hospital 
bills than younger people. Records of 



past years show that people over 65 
require two and a half times as much 
hospital care as those under 65. 

"How far does present health in- 
surance go in covering those bills? 
Only 35% of those over 65 have 
health insurance — compared with 
75% of those under 65. Those who 
need the most protection have the 
least." 

To meet the medical needs of the 
aged, President Kennedy proposes a 
plan that would provide the fol- 
lowing — 

1) Inpatient hospital services for up 
to 90 days. Hospital services would 
include all those customarily furnished 
by a hospital for its patients, and 
would be subject to a deductible 
amount (paid by the patient) of $10 
per day for up to 9 days, with a 
minimum of $20. 

2) Skilled home nursing services 
after the patient is transferred from 
the hospital, for up to 180 days. 

3) Outpatient hospital diagnostic 
services, as required, subject to a $20 
deductible amount for each complete 
diagnostic study. 

4) Home health services for up to 
240 visits during a calendar year. 
These visits would include intermit- 
tent nursing care, therapy, and part- 
time homemaker services. 

The program would be financed 
primarily by increasing the social 
security contribution rate by l A of 




PRESIDENT KENNEDY 

expresses himself on medical care. 



1% for both employers and em- 
ployes and % of 1% for self- 
employed persons, beginning with 
1963. The draft bill also provides for 
increasing the taxable earnings base 
from $4,800 to $5,000 per year, be- 
ginning with 1962. Raising the earn- 
ing base would provide the benefit 
structure of the system generally and 
would also provide additional income 
which, together with the income from 
the contribution rate increase, would 
fully meet all the costs of the health 
insurance program. 

The reaction of the AMA borders 
on the hysterical. Using the old 
"chestnut," Socialism, that has been 
raised against every social reform for 
the past 50 years, the opponents of 
Mr. Kennedy's program are distorting 
the facts. The President said in his 
message to the Congress — 

"This program is not a program of 
socialized medicine. It is a program 
of prepayment of health costs with 
absolute freedom of choice guaran- 
teed. Every person will choose his 
own doctor and hospital. 

"No service performed by any 
physician at either home or office and 
no fee he charges for such services, 
would be involved, covered or affected 
in any way. There would be no 
supervision or control over the prac- 
tice of medicine by any doctor or over 
the manner in which medical services 
are provided by any hospital. The 
program is a sound one and entirely 
in accordance with the traditional 
American system of placing responsi- 
bility on the employe and the em- 
ployer, rather than on the general 
taxpayers, to help finance retirement 
and health costs." 

This debate is a most serious mat- 
ter. The U. S. has fallen behind most 
of the Western democracies in the 
care of the aged. We now need a 
vigorous, intelligent debate throughout 
the land. The doctors might lead the 
way by sticking to the facts. Again 
to quote the Criterion, "It would be 
a great pity if the medical profession 
began to slip in the public esteem and 
good will because of the AMA's doc- 
trinaire intransigence in matters main- 
ly social and political . . . the AMA 
might refresh itself on the old story 
of King Canute sitting at the sea- 
shore, defying the rising tides." 



JUNE, 1961 



m 



■t:»j&*M 



$> 



<1 



No. A16 



$5.49 




lay your 
hammer 
in the Rocket's 
shadow and 

compare them 
point by point. 
Youll find out 
why the True 
Temper Rochet 
is a better way 
to drive a nail. 
Then go to your 
hardware 
store and heft 
a Rocket. It's 
the greatest 
feeling in 
hammering 



Striking face chamfered and 
crowned for more durability; 
drives nail straighter, more 
completely; won't mar wood. 

Full-polished, octagon-pattern 
neck and poll— preferred 
by professional carpenters. 

Forged-steel head, heat-treat- 
ed three ways — for strength at 
eye section, hardness of face, 
correct temper in the claws. 

Patented, locked-on head will 
not loosen or fly off in use. 
Withstands 5-ton pull tests. 

Inside edges of claws precisely 
tapered. The Rocket will bite 
and pull out a headless nail. 

Improved tubular-steel handle 
is the strongest made. It's 
a result of True Temper's 
years of experience in making 
tubular-steel golf-club shafts. 

Handle's oval shape actually 
gives each blow more power. 

Shock-absorbing cushion grip 
is comfortable and lively — 
seems to grip back. Bonded 
to handle by hot vulcanizing 
process — won't turn or loosen. 

Grip is made of neoprene to 
resist oil and grease, and it's 
impregnated with pulverized 
fiber to keep grip from slipping, 
wet or dry, or in gloved hand. 

Steel end plate on handle keeps 
end from driving through grip 
in tapping work. Cushion end 
will not mark or damage work. 



THE CARPENTER 



Our National 
Parks -Great 
Assets of All 
Americans 



IT'S vacation time. June's bursting 
beauty makes the most diligent 
worker forget his job for a while as 
he dreams of travel, vacation spots, 
relaxation and fun. These days many 
Americans and Canadians travel great 
distances to see the natural wonders 
of their two countries. Fortunately, 
in both countries there are extensive 
developments and projects under gov- 
ernment auspices to preserve the scenic 
wonders. This month's cover of THE 
CARPENTER records just one of the 
places of majestic loveliness — Yosem- 
ite National Park. 

The U. S. has been evolving its 
system of National Parks since 1872. 
In that year Yellowstone National 
Park was established. In the years 
since the Park Service has acquired 
vast areas that are judged to have the 
nation's most inspiring scenery and to 
be places of important, historic, pre- 
historic and scientific interest. 

One of the most delightful ways to 
plans trips to these parks or to have 
an "armchair tour" at home is by 
reading "Our Country's National 
Parks". These two volumes were pub- 
lished some years ago by Bobbs-Mer- 
rill. They were a great success. This 
year they were re-issued in a brand 
new edition to commemorate the en- 
trance of Hawaii and Alaska into the 
Union. Just turning the pages of these 
handsome books is fun. The photo- 
graphs are splendid. 

The grandeur and beauty of 16 fa- 
mous National Parks are set forth in 
the first volume. The fascination and 
many wonders of fabulous Yellow- 
stone are portrayed. There are color- 
ful excursions to the majestic and 
mysterious underground worlds of 
Carlsbad Caverns, Mammoth Cave 
and Wind Cave. Here, too, are painted 
fascinating pictures of the "Fountains 
of Youth" — Hot Springs and Piatt 
National Parks. 

This volume also brings out the 
quiet loveliness of Shenandoah, the 
rugged charm of Acadia, the magnifi- 
cence of the Great Smokies, and the 
lonely splendor of Isle Royale, our 
island park in Lake Superior. It de- 




"Old Faithful" is virtually a "trademark" of the national parks. Here the famous 
geyser in Yellowstone National Park is shown in action. 



scribes the beautiful Evergald Ever- 
glades, an untamed wilderness. The 




An unusual view of a section of the 
Grand Canyon of the Colorado, a major 
vacation attraction. 



magnificent "Rainbows in the Desert": 
Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion 
and Big Bend National Parks are set 
forth in all their splendor. 

In the second volume the great 
parks of the high Sierras are included: 
enchanting Yosemite, Sequoia and 
Kings Canyon. Here too, are the ma- 
jestic parks of our western mountain 
ranges: Rocky Mountain, Grand 
Teton, Glacier, and unspoiled Olym- 
pic. Far to the North, in Alaska, is 
Mount McKinley, the tallest peak in 
North America. Finally, in the desert 
region is Mesa Verde, the "Land of 
the Ancient People," former home of 
the American cliff dwellers. 

Any reader who decides after look- 
ing at these books that he just can't 
stay home this summer can write to 
Mr. Conrad L. Wirth, Director of the 
National Park Service, Washington 25, 
D. C. Mr. Wirth will send him all the 
information he wants about the Na- 
tional Park he has decided to visit. 



JUNE, 1961 



What About the Peace 
Corps? 

The Peace Corps has issued 
a 28-page "Fact Book" to an- 
swer the many inquiries that 
have flooded the White House 
since President Kennedy set up 
the youth group to aid in Amer- 
ica's great quest for peace. It 
can be obtained by writing to 
Mr. Tom Mathews, Acting Di- 
rector, Public Information, The 
Peace Corps, Washington 25, 
D.C. 

Further information on ways 
in which workers may partici- 
pate can be obtained by writing 
Harry Pollak, AFL-CIO Inter- 
national Representative, who has 
been appointed as liaison be- 
tween the Peace Corps and the 
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S E CT I ON 



IT'S TIME TO TAKE STOCK 



SPEAKING to the Empire Club in 
Winnipeg recently, Claude Jodoin, 
President of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, pointed to the tremendous 
changes which have taken place since 
the turn of the century and mentioned 
a few of them. 

For example, the "occupational rev- 
olution" which has taken place in 
Canada's labor force. 

It is partly because of the changes 
taking place in job opportunities that 
Canada is faced with a continuing 
unemployment situation, he said. 

There has been a tremendous shift 
from rural to urban areas. At the 
beginning of this century over 40 per 
cent of the working force was engaged 
in agriculture. Today it is just over 
1 1 per cent and it is estimated that in 
the next generation only 8% will be 
working on farms. 

Over the same period of time there 
has been a great change in the balance 
between "blue collar" and "white col- 
lar" workers — between those engaged 
in production and those engaged in 
managerial and clerical jobs. While 
the number of "blue collar" workers 
has remained at 28%, the number of 
"white collar" workers has jumped 
from 15% to almost 40%. 

The CLC president could have 
mentioned a long list of important 
changes. Canada had become a much 
more cosmopolitan nation in the past 
60 years. Not very long ago we were 
a predominantly Anglo-Saxon country 
Immigrants from the British Isles 
made up the major portion of the 
population except in Quebec, largely 
French-Canadian, and the western 
provinces which has a large admixture 
of peoples from many parts of Eu- 
rope, particularly the Ukraine. 

In the last generation, Canada has 
absorbed a substantial number of im- 



migrants from European countries so 
that now, a longtime Anglo-Saxon 
stronghold like Toronto, has about 10 
per cent of its population of Italian 
origin with good numbers of Dutch, 
Germans, Hungarians and others. 

Another change in the working 
force itself has been the continued 
increase of women so now they make 
up almost 30% — and the percentage 
of unemployed women is lower than 
the percentage of men. 

It is interesting to observe that 
these two changes — the increase in 
immigration and the increase of 
women in the working force — are of- 
ten blamed for the high level of un- 
employment. The former charge has 
been dealt with by the research de- 
partment of the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress which proved conclusively that 
immigration cannot be fairly held re- 
sponsible. 

For example, the worst unemploy- 
ment is in the eastern provinces. Yet 
these very areas have had the fewest 
number of immigrants. The Metro 
Toronto area has had the largest in- 
flux of immigrants — just about 25% 
of all immigrants have settled here. 
Yet the jobless rate in this area com- 
pares more than favorably with any 
other. 

Do women in employment cause 
unemployment? The new jobs opening 
up are in the commercial and service 
industries — typing, clerical work, re- 
tail trade, laundry and restaurant 
workers — where women are most 
suited. 

John Lee, education and publicity 
officer of the Ontario Hydro Em- 
ployees' union wrote in a recent article 
that "unless something drastic is done 
to retrain a large part of our male 
labor force, women will steadily re- 
place men as the chief breadwinners 



of our society." This is something to 
think about. Maybe we men will like 
it! 

Great transformations are taking 
place in other aspects of our economy. 
The transportation industry has been 
revolutionized with air transport tak- 
ing over from rail to such an extent 
that the major passenger travel agency 
today is Trans-Canada Airlines and 
not the CN and CPR. 

Automation and technological 
changes are of course wreaking havoc 
with formerly normal industrial and 
commercial employment patterns. A 
big Canadian brewery erects a new 
plant, shuts down two or three old 
plants and lays off 600 union workers. 
A major Canadian distillery introduces 
ultramodern mechanized equipment 
and lays off two-thirds of the produc- 
tion line. Workers lost jobs. Produc- 
tion costs are cut. Prices remain the 
same. Profits go up. That's the pat- 
tern of the early 1960s. 

The most remarkable and far-reach- 
ing change of all is in the role of gov- 
ernment. Just about 20 years ago 
Canada's gross national product — the 
total production of goods and services 
— was around six billion dollars. Last 
year our gross national product was 
over 35 billion dollars. 

But this is the interesting point. 
The federal government alone col- 
lected as much in taxes in 1960 as 
the amount of the gross national 
product in 1940 — over six billion dol- 
lars. All the taxation by all levels of 
government — federal, provincial and 
municipal — adds up to about eight 
and a half billion dollars today. The 
role of government has become the 
dominant factor in our society, in both 
its economic and social aspects. 

Just as remarkable has become the 
role of international affairs. No coun- 



JUNE, 196 1 



try is self-sufficient, certainly not 
Canada. Canada has to trade to live. 
Farm and forest products exports are 
basic to our economy. This country 
ranks fifth among trading nations in 
the non-Communist world. The de- 
velopment of the Inner Six and the 
Outer Seven as economic groups in 
Europe could have serious repercus- 
sions on our standard of living. The 
importance of the British Common- 
wealth bloc in our trade relations has 
diminished, our trade relations with 
the United States are the most im- 
portant single factor in our import- 
export balances. 

These are only a partial list of the 
changes which have taken place with- 
in living memory of many of us. But 
it is a rapidly changing world and the 
country which doesn't readily adapt 
itself could get easily lost in the ruck. 
The question is, is Canada moving 
forward fast enough? 

Ontario Commission 
Issues First Decision 

In its first ruling since its creation 
under Ontario's revised Labor Rela- 
tions Act, the Industrial Disputes 
Commission has taken a hospital proj- 
ect away from one union and split it 
between two others. 

The commission machinery was set 
up by the Ontario government in an 
attempt to solve jurisdictional issues 
in the province rather than have them 
go to a U.S. -based body. 

The commission ruled that installa- 
tion of windows at London's West- 
minster Hospital comes under the 
jurisdiction of a composite crew of 
carpenters and iron workers. 

The union dispute over boundaries 
led to a three-day work stoppage at 
the $5,000,000 project in March. 

The Iron Workers Union claimed 
it had the right to install the windows 
being done by the Painters and Dec- 
orators Union. The iron workers were 
supported by the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners, which has 
an agreement with the Iron Workers 
Union covering window installation. 

The Painters and Decorators Union 
agreed that it did not have jurisdiction 
but maintained that the hospital gen- 
eral contractor would not award the 
installation contract to the other 
unions. 

Commission chairman Herbert Or- 
iiffe said the ruling applied only to 
the one job but J. M. Jones, Carpen- 
ter union business agent, claimed it 
would set a precedent for similar dis- 
putes. 




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10 



THE CARPENTER 



"The Tacoma Story" Is Smash Success 



One of the most successful feature 
articles ever published in THE CAR- 
PENTER appeared in the February 
and March issues of this year. It was 
entitled "The Tacoma Story". 

This two-part article presented 
forceful arguments for the use of 
wood in the building of schools. The 
information in the articles is set forth 
in such a way that members of the 
Brotherhood can use it in their own 
communities in presenting arguments 
for the adoption of school plans that 
will enable communities to build better 
schools at less cost. 

THE CARPENTER was deluged 
with requests for re-prints. To date 
some 7,500 have been sent out. The 
letters from the locals, the Councils 
and the individual members of the 
Brotherhood make it clear the pam- 
phlet hit the mark in many cities and 
towns across the land. 

Twenty thousand copies were given 
out during the week-long Union In- 
dustries Show at Detroit in April. 

"The Tacoma Story" has stimulated 
editorial support for the use of wood 
in school construction. The following 
editorial appeared in the Santa Rosa, 
Cal., PRESS DEMOCRAT: 

A 'Yes' Vote Will Help 

A while back, The Press Demo- 
crat commented that architects in 
California seemed to have less ap- 
preciation of the economy and value 
of wood in construction of public 
buildings than did their contempo- 
raries in states which do not pro- 
duce lumber. This viewpoint was 
reinforced by letters from readers 
who cited such extremes as use of 
asbestos shingles on state-designed 
forestry buildings in wooded areas. 

You'll be glad to know that the 
architectual specifications for the 
building program in the Santa Rosa 
High School District on which the 
voters will pass in next Tuesday's 
election call for maximum use of 
wood building materials. 

Glue-laminated beams — the man- 
ufacture of which is one of the 
major payrolls of Sonoma County 
— are specified in all instances but 
a minor one where greater economy 
would result from use of steel. 

Double-sheathed plywood, an- 



other Redwood Empire product, is 
specified for all walls where stresses 
permit. 

These materials are equal or su- 
perior to substitute ones from the 
standpoints of strengths, safety, long 
life and economy. And they have 
the added virtue of creating jobs in 
the forest products industries which 
are the lifeblood of this area's 
economy. 

Your "Yes" vote next Tuesday 
thus will perform two useful duties. 
It will provide the necessary class- 
rooms for the pupils who right now 
are moving through the elementary 
schools into junior high schools 
which do not have the capacities to 
receive them; and from the junior 
highs into the high schools which 
are similarly overcrowded. Your 
vote will also, because of the archi- 
tectural specifications, help solve the 
unemployment problem in our basic 
industry at the same time it is solv- 
ing the problem of classroom 
shortages. 

The Carpenter office still has a 
supply of "The Tacoma Story" reprint 
on hand. Just drop a card or note to 
222 East Michigan, Indianapolis, Ind. 
and get a copy. How about seeing 
that members of the local School 
Board read it too? 




616. 






'Sh-h,Madam!...:Un\on Made' 
is a forbidden term in this 
store— but tell me about ill* 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION 

Two pamphlets of particular 
interest to members of the 
Brotherhood have been issued 
by the U. S. Department of Ag- 
riculture. 

The first one is designed to 
give American families a better 
understanding of how the Na- 
tional Forests are managed. It 
describes sustained-yield multi- 
ple-use of the National Forests 
in non-technical down-to-earth 
language. 

"Multiple Use — the National 
Forests and Your Family" is a 
pocketbook-sized, 23-page book, 
with photographs or drawings 
on every page. It is printed in 
forest green and a free copy 
may be obtained from the For- 
est Service, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Washington 2 5 , 
D. C. 

The second pamphlet is a re- 
port on forestry practice in the 
Soviet Union. This is a study 
in contrasts. 

"Forestry and the Forest In- 
dustry in the U.S.S.R." is also 
published by the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

This pamphlet contains the 
results of a study made by a 
seven-man forestry team from 
the U. S. that traveled in the 
Soviet Union in 1959. They 
traveled some 6,000 miles in 30 
days and saw logging operations 
at Krestzy, research institutes, 
experimental forest and mills, in 
and around Leningrad; then 
journeyed through Karelia, the 
Ukraine, Crimea and Georgia 
to Stalingrad where they ex- 
amined shelterbelt operations 
before returning to Moscow to 
start the homeward flight. 

The 90-page report is filled 
with fascinating facts that help 
to illuminate the vast differences 
between life in the Soviet Union 
and in the free world. 

"Forestry and the Forest In- 
dustry in the U.S.S.R." may be 
purchased for 55^ from the Su- 
perintendent of Documents, 
Washington 25, D. C. 



JUNE, 1961 



11 



IKMTOMJAIL 




Capitalism with a Conscience 

Some of labor's critics are prone to say that labor is 
"anti-capital." This is a gross over-simplification. It 
is true that in the long history of the development of 
organized labor the capitalists frequently found them- 
selves at odds with labor's goals. It is quite obvious 
why. Labor was seeking a fair deal. The working 
people were asking for their rightful place in the sun. 
Again and again the capitalists took a shortsighted 
position and tried to keep profits for the few. Today 
most of the "robber barons" and tycoons of the old 
days are a part of history. Labor and management 
meet now in an atmosphere of mutual need and con- 
cern. 

Nowadays labor frequently speaks up in praise 
of capital, management and the profit system. 
Why? Today in the free world there is a more 
enlightened use of the great profits of the free en- 
terprise system. One of the most dramatic ex- 
amples of this is the work of the Rockefeller 
Foundation and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. 
At one time the name Rockefeller was synony- 
mous with great wealth and vast oil profits. The 
name conjured up the picture of an old man sit- 
ting in the Florida sunshine giving bright, new 
dimes to little boys. But no more. His son and 
grandsons have given the family name new mean- 
ing. The vast Rockefeller Foundation gives 
great sums each year to charity, conservation, 
education, cancer research, art and music. 

Doubleday has recently published a report, "Pros- 
pect for America." This $1.45 paperback is a series 
of papers that resulted from studies sponsored by the 
Rockefeller Brothers Fund. For this study a group 
of "eggheads" and professional thinkers were brought 
together to discuss, study and report on the great 
challenges that America faces in the midcentury. The 
result is stimulating. This book defines our problems 
in foreign policy and at home. The problems of mili- 
tary security and economic well-being are analyzed. 
The role of education and the power of the demo- 
cratic idea are examined in the light of the Soviet 
challenge. 

The Rockefellers have spent their money well. 

The book gives guidance to every citizen who is 

concerned today — concerned for his home, his 

family, his job and his country. 

The publication of "Prospect for America" shows 

capitalism putting its many dollars forward. 



Now Is The Time for All Good Men 
to Come to the Aid of the Aged 

President Kennedy's medical care for the aged 
program is now before the Congress. As a piece of 
pending legislation it is called the Anderson-King Bill. 
This issue of The Carpenter has an article setting forth 
the main provisions of this badly needed program. It 
is the interest of all union members to familiarize 
themselves with what Mr. Kennedy has proposed and 
then take action. 

The needed action is quite simple. The members 
of the Congress must be made to feel the pressure of 
the "folks back home". It will cost each interested 
member of the Brotherhood just 12c 1 in postage and 
a few minutes of his time to let his Congressman and 
two Senators know that organized labor is not being 
misled by the wildly irresponsible program of the 
American Medical Association. The majority of the 
people can still think clearly and logically. The people 
in this country know we need — and need badly — a 
professionally competent, privately run medical pro- 
gram for our senior citizens paid for out of the Social 
Security funds. 




George W. Norris 1861-1961 

It is heartening to read of the formation of the 
George W. Norris Centennial Organization. This is 
a name that American labor recalls with gratitude. 
Some of the younger generation may need to be re- 
minded just who George W. Norris was. 

He was born on July 11, 1861. He served in Con- 
gress from Nebraska for 40 years. From March 4, 
1903 until March 3, 1913 he was in the House. He 
was in the Senate from March 4, 1914 to January 3, 
1943. He died in McCook, Nebraska, on September 
2, 1944. 

The members of the labor movement will re- 
call the Norris-LaGuardia Act. Here Norris 
joined forces with the "Little Flower" from New 
York and banned the "Yellow Dog" contracts. 
This was acclaimed as the "Magna Carta of 
Labor." 
His name is linked closely with such major land- 
marks of progress as the Tennessee Valley Authority 
Act of 1933, the Rural Electrification Act of 1936 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



and the 20th (Lame Duck) Amendment to the U. S. 
Constitution. 

Members of the Centennial Organization in- 
clude Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Speaker Sam 
Rayburn, George Meany, President, AFL-CIO, 
and Walter P. Reuther, President, United Auto 
Workers, AFL-CIO. 
The group plans to publish a booklet on Norris 
and has been successful in urging the Post Office to 
issue a commemorative stamp this year. In Nebraska, 
a state Centennial Committee is planning a series of 
events, as is a group in the TVA area. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt said, "George Norris 
was the very perfect, gentle knight of American 
progressive ideals whose life was an able and 
heroic fight on behalf of the American citizen." 



It Is Handy to Blame Labor 

America seems to be developing a "scapegoat" com- 
plex. If anything goes wrong at the national level — in 
foreign policy — politics — or economic affairs a great 
search is launched for someone or something to blame. 

In recent weeks there have been extended discus- 
sions about the missile base building program in this 
country. Many seem to believe that we are not push- 
ing ahead fast enough. This seems to be partially 
true. A variety of factors have slowed us down. But 
some segments of the press and the citizenry have 
decided to blame unions and their members for the 
entire lag. 

In his monthly report to the members of the 
Brotherhood our General President, Maurice A. 
Hutcheson, sets the record straight. We suggest you 
read carefully his comments on Page 32 of this issue 
of THE CARPENTER. 

Some day in America we may see an editorial pro- 
gram in which the press just blames labor one day a 
week for all the ills of mankind. The other days would 
be aside for other groups like business, the churches, 
teenagers, mothers, foreigners, dogs and our ancestors. 
Note that we have left out the press itself. Far be it 
from us to suggest that the press is ever to blame for 
anything. 



Chamber of Commerce Repeals 
20th Century 

The United States Chamber of Commerce recently 
held its annual national meeting in Washington. The 
delegates, in a series of resolutions, decided to get out 
of the 20th Century. 



With little or no debate, the 3,000 delegates 
asked a complete halt to Federal spending on 
urban development and public housing; they re- 
jected President Kennedy's program of medical 
care for the aged and they called for the dis- 
solution of the White House Advisory Committee 
on Labor-Management Policy. 

Following this ludicrous performance these repre- 
sentatives of American business booed Senator Joseph 
Clark of Pennsylvania who was trying to "talk sense" 
to them. The Senator told the Chamber members the 
views they held might be popular in their own world 
but they were considered outdated elsewhere. 

Senator Clark then expressed what we think is 
an overly-optimistic hope. He said he hoped the 
members of the Chamber of Commerce would 
grow up. But if we are wrong and in the next 
few years the members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce do decide to "grow into" the 20th Century 
we hope they will, at the same time, recall the 
good manners they were taught by their mothers. 
Gentlemen, booing is a bit childish. We know 
you are unhappy that Mr. Kennedy is in the 
White House rather than Mr. Goldwater but 
that's the way the ball bounces. 




The Truth Always Does Hurt 

The cries of anguish were loud. Across the land 
Americans could hear the proud men weeping, shout- 
ing and moaning. The Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf 
Astoria Hotel in New York was a scene of human 
suffering not equaled in human pathos since Eliza 
first crossed the ice in "Uncle Tom's Cabin". 

What happened? Well, it really is quite simple to 
tell. The President of the United States had just asked 
the newspaper publishers in America to exercise re- 
straint in the publication of news dealing with the 
Cold War. He had asked the owners of the Fourth 
Estate to ask themselves and their staffs to take as a 
guide post the question "Will this story hurt the 
United States?" 

The self-appointed "guardians of freedom" seemed 
to take leave of their brains as they screamed "censor- 
ship" in their august papers the following day. 

Their performance in response to Mr. Kennedy's 
plea that they accept responsibility strikes us as shock- 
ing. Freedom of the press is not unrestrained license. 
In these days when the free world is locked in intel- 
lectual and sometimes military combat with the Red 
forces around the globe it behooves all of us to behave 
as sober, responsible citizens. 

May we remind the publishers that Justice Oliver 
Wendell Holmes once said, "Freedom of speech does 
not carry with it the right to yell fire in a crowded 
theatre." 



JUNE, 196 1 



13 



fe 



UCJ 





t*l 



Young People Need A Break 



This is the month of decision for 
many of our young people. Perhaps 
it is a question of whether to take and 
where to find their first summer job. 
Or perhaps they feel they would like 
to drop out of school for good and 
take a permanent position. It is a time 
when they need all the help and guid- 
ance they can find. Let's look more 
closely at one such young person. 

On meeting Billy, you probably find 
him very much like most of the other 
high school students you know. He's 
just seventeen, tall, clean-cut, good- 
natured, yet serious about things. 

Billy works after school in the mail 
room of a company that is widely 
respected in his town. He's so inter- 
ested in everything that happens there 
that he thinks he would like to work 
permanently for the company after he 
graduates. His social life is happy, 
too. He has a steady girl, and he's 
active in the young people's groups at 
church and the community center. 

But Billy wasn't always that way. A 
couple of years ago, he made up his 
mind he was going to quit school as 
soon as he reached his sixteenth birth- 
day. He wasn't getting anything at all 
out of his classes and he wanted to be 
on his own. He had two buddies who 
had already dropped out. It didn't 
make any difference to Billy that one 
of them was on probation for posses- 
sion of a weapon and that the other 
hadn't been able to find a job in the 
three months since he'd left school. 

Billy had no idea what he wanted 
to do, but he knew he wanted a job. 
He'd never worked before and he had 
no training. But he was sure some- 
body would want to hire a strong boy 
who wasn't dumb. A friend of his 
mother's told him about an opening 
at the company where she worked, and 
he was confident he'd get the job. 

Billy had no idea that a million 
other teen-agers would be applying for 
this job (or others like it) this year. 
How was he to know that competition 
for beginning jobs was stiffer than at 
any other time in history? He was 



completely unaware that today's teen- 
agers face the biggest demands in his- 
tory for education and training, have 
the highest rate of unemployment of 
any age group (twice the national 
average), and compete for the few 
simple repetitive jobs for which they 
qualify against their own zooming 
youth population, preferred experi- 
enced workers, and machines. 

He didn't get the job and was 
shocked and discouraged by the things 
the personnel man told him. The man 
was sympathetic, but he said, "Billy, 
why don't you think about going back 
to school? You're going to have a 
rough time landing any job without 
skills or a high school diploma." 




iib&ttijl 




But Billy was a fighter, and he 
wasn't going to let this get him down. 
Every morning, he looked at the want- 
ads and finally his persistence got re- 
sults. But . . . what a come-down! 
The boy who was so sure his brains 
and strength were sure to pay off 
began to work part-time as a janitor's 
helper. It was the only job for which 
he was even considered. 

After a few weeks of dreary, ex- 
hausting work, Billy got angry and 
quit. He was back in the same old rat- 
race. He drifted from one menial job 
to another. 

Nothing had ever been so discourag- 
ing. It made him irritable and quarrel- 
some with his parents. He was still 
determined to "make it" in the adult 



world, but now his desperation led him 
to consider joining the boys he knew 
who were sticking up stores and ped- 
dling drugs. 

Just at this dangerous moment, Billy 
got his first break. He ran into one 
of his old teachers who suggested that 
he drop into the office of the new 
Youth Employment Service. Billy was 
lucky that his town had a group like 
this, because there he found people 
who really wanted to help. 

They asked Billy to come in once 
or twice a week to talk with the place- 
ment counselor. At first, he wasn't 
too sure about it. He acted as if the 
counselor were one of the personnel 
men who had turned him down. But 
the counselor didn't seem to mind the 
chip on his shoulder, and pretty soon 
Billy got very interested in the things 
they were talking about. 

He learned a lot about himself and 
the kinds of things he could do well. 
He also began to understand a lot of 
things about the adult world and what 
it expected of a boy becoming a man. 
Now, with the counselor's help, he 
could begin to make practical plans 
for beating the employment rat-race. 

The kind of help Billy received will 
be offered to many more young people 
in many communities throughout the 
country as a result of the work of the 
National Committee on Employment 
of Youth. This new service is help- 
ing adults to understand the problems 
youngsters have in relation to jobs and 
how important it is to our whole na- 
tion that each of its young citizens be 
equipped to use his talents and abilities 
to do the work that needs to be done. 
The Committee also lets people know 
how important it is to see that young- 
sters get the help they need and to 
increase work opportunities for them. 
NCEY goes into cities all over the 
country on request to help local social 
agencies, schools, businesses, trade 
unions and interested citizens set up 
the employment services teenagers 
need. 

It wasn't long before Billy discov- 
ered that he wanted to go back to 



14 



THE CARPENTER 





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^'V -v, 


t I ^1 


■■ youth & ■ ^r^m 

■ STUDENT DIV.l g g^jg ^-^ 


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school. He knew now what he could 
get from the classes and how useful 
he was going to find the things he 
learned. The counselor helped him to 
get the part-time job he still has. Billy 
began to feel he was accomplishing 
something both at work and school. 

Billy's experience is no unique. The 
director of a Youth Employment Serv- 
ice in Cincinnati has this to say about 
employment-help for teenagers, "Our 
objective in findings these jobs is not 
only the desire for youth to make 
money. More important is the total 
effect of this employment in the devel- 
opment of attitudes and values result- 
ing in good work habits and a better 
understanding of the employer-em- 
ploye relationship." 

School and the job were not the 
only things that helped Billy. His coun- 
selor arranged to have him sit in on 
group discussions with other teen- 
agers. Sometimes they acted out job 
interviews, with one pretending to be 
the personnel man while the other 
would apply for a job. This gave them 
practice, as well as tips on how to 
dress and behave. 

Today, teen-agers need help in pre- 
paring for, getting, and adjusting to 
suitable and satisfying jobs. Young 
people who are socially, educationally 
or emotionally "handicapped" need it 
most. They include the 900,000 who 
drop out of school each year before 
graduation, 50,000 with court records, 
slow learners, children of minority 
groups and migratory farm workers. 

Youngsters are not the only ones 
who will profit. Employers are having 
trouble filling many jobs, even in areas 
where unemployment is high. Com- 
petition among companies for workers 
of dependable quality is becoming 
more and more acute. Teen-agers 
represent the largest, most flexible and 
trainable source of personnel. U.S. 
production could get a big lift if 
youngsters could get better direction. 
With our expanding economy and the 
growth of our nation, they are the 
manpower on whom all of us are de- 
pending for so much. Where com- 



munities share NCEY's goals, import- 
ant things are happening. Boys like 
Billy are avoiding the dangers of bore- 
dom, defeat, and delinquency and be- 
coming happy, useful citizens. 

We have digressed a bit from our 
usual theme this month, but we felt 
that the parents of young adults among 
our readers would appreciate knowing 
about the services available to guide 
and assist them during these important 
months of their lives as they try to 
decide their life's work and how much 
education they will bring to it. If you 
want to know more, write to the Na- 
tional Committee on Employment 
of Youth, 419 Park Ave., S., New 
York 16. 



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foremost professional estimator, 

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JUNE, 196 1 



15 




PROGRESS 
REPORT 




A skilled craftsman, upper left, puts the finishing 
touches on the Brotherhood's next address on our new 
headquarters in Washington. Seen above is the view 
looking northeast up Louisiana Ave. toward the Union 
Station. The Peace Monument (in circle) and the House 
of Representatives Third Office Building are seen below. 
From the dome of the top-floor cafeteria the great dome 
of the U. S. Capitol is visible at center left. Toward the 
southwest, lower left, is the new Federal Office Building. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm, Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, J. O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



TO ALL FINANCIAL SECRETARIES — 

DEATH AND DISABILITY CLAIMS 



It is the desire of the General Office to 
process and properly dispose of all applica- 
tions for funeral or disability donations as ex- 
peditiously as possible. Financial Secretaries 
can greatly assist us in that endeavor by seeing 
that each claim is completely and properly 
filled out and promptly mailed directly to the 
GENERAL TREASURER, along with the 
required supporting papers. 

As the funeral donation on the death of a 
member is payable to the decedent's estate, 
or to the person presenting proof that he or 
she has paid the funeral expenses, with each 
such claim we must have either Letters of 
Administration or the funeral bill, indicating 



who the responsible person is. 

This is not required in a claim for funeral 
donation on the death of a member's wife or 
husband. In such claims the member should 
always be named as "Applicant" for the dona- 
tion, unless the member for some reason is 
incompetent and unable to take care of his or 
her own affairs. In that event we should have 
Power of Attorney or Guardianship papers. 

If there are any unusual circumstances in 
connection with any claim, a full explanation 
should be forwarded with the application for 
funeral donation. By so doing you may elim- 
inate much unnecessary correspondence and 
delay in the proper adjustment of the claim. 



JUNE, 1961 



17 



Is The American Worker Expendable? 

BY EARL HARTLEY 

Executive Secretary, Western Council, Lumber and Sawmill Workers 
(Reprinted from The Union Register, Portland, Oregon) 



FOR several years the Western 
Council has been expressing its 
concern over the importation of Japa- 
nese plywood manufactured with la- 
bor which is paid less than 1/1 3th the 
wages of American workers. We have 
watched with great concern the rapid- 
ly increasing importation of lumber 
from Canada manufactured with 
cheaper labor and stumpage, and the 
decline of lumber employment in the 
Pacific Northwest. 

We have been told by our friends 
in Congress and in government that 
this is the price we must pay for a 
sound policy of international relations. 
It has been argued that this is the 
sacrifice which the lumber and saw- 
mill workers must make in the 
interests of our national security. 

We have wanted to argue with our 
friends. We have wanted to point out 
that the basis for American interna- 
tional trade policy has been to take 
into account the serious disparity that 
exists in wages and labor standards, 
and to relax tariff barriers gradually 
as the other countries raise their 
standards. But on the whole we have 
restrained ourselves and have gone 
along — although we know well that 
our problems have not received the 
same considerations as those of in- 
dustries located in states with larger 
Congressional delegations. 

Now, however, we are confronted 
with a threat far more serious than 
anything we have heretofore known. 
The Japanese are coming into Oregon, 
Washington and California to pur- 
chase timber and logs in large quan- 
tities, to transport them to Japan for 
manufacture. The Japanese repre- 
sentatives have reportedly been told 
to buy the logs regardless of cost. 
From what we can learn, Japan is 
ready to subsidize the acquisition of 
logs from the Pacific Northwest so 
that Japanese workers can obtain the 
employment involved in converting 
them into lumber. 

But what about American workers? 
Who is to protect their jobs? This isn't 
a case of where American workers or 
industry are not efficient enough to 
compete. How can any individual 
company in the lumber or plywood 
industry compete against the govern- 
ment of Japan? 



What are our friends going to tell 
us now? That we must give up our 
jobs in lumber and plywood so that 
the Japanese can manufacture our 
timber? How can they justify the 
argument this time when we can 
manufacture the lumber and ship it to 
them cheaper than they can buy the 
logs and transport them to Japan? 
What happens to their international 
trade arguments when the shoe is on 
the other foot, and we are the ones 
who can produce on the free market 
at lower cost? 

We think it wonderful that the 
Japanese have a new administration 
which is concerned about the welfare 
of its citizens and wants to increase 
housing starts. We applaud the con- 
cern of the Japanese with the sus- 
tained yield capabilities of their 
forests so that they want to obtain a 
larger portion of their raw material 
requirements from abroad. But what 
is wrong with our lumber? If they 
expect to go on selling transistor ra- 
dios, cameras, household items and 
similar manufactured goods to Amer- 
ican workers, why is it wrong for 
them to buy some items which we can 
manufacture with our logs, cheaper 
than they can? We thought that in- 
ternational trade was supposed to be a 
two way affair. 

The Western Council is represented 
on the O & C Advisory Committee. 
We went along with the removal of 
marketing areas from the O & C lands 
on the grounds that it was for the pur- 
pose of increasing free competition 
for logs within the Douglas Fir region 
of California, Oregon and Washing- 



ton. No one told us that the removal 
of the marketing areas would be used 
to permit the Japanese to pirate the 
logs from the O & C forests. 

The O & C Act, like most sustained 
yield forest statutes, states as its pub- 
lic purpose that the timber should be 
used to provide a permanent economic 
base under the communities which are 
dependent on forest industries. This 
was translated by past administrators 
as meaning that at least "primary 
processing" of the timber should be 
performed in the area in which the 
timber was located. This is the rule 
applying to the national forest timber 
in the Gray's Harbor area of Wash- 
(Continued on Page 23) 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 




Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 




Belsaw Machinery Co., 

Kansas City, Mo 

Construct-o-Wear Shoe Co 
Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 


8 
23 

15 

21 

8 

20 

30 
25 
Dver 
18 
6 
25 


Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III... 
Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss. 
R. G. Nicholas Apron Co., Inc., 

Huntington Park, Calif 

Simplex Level Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Skil Corp., Chicago, III 4th C 

Swanson Tool Co., Oak Lawn, III. 
True Temper Corp., Cleveland, Ohio 
U-Etch-lt 


Technical Courses and Books 


Audel Publishers, New York, N.Y.. 
Chicago Technical College, 
Chicago, III 


20 

10 

23 

15 
22 


Cline-Sigmon Publishers, Hickory, 
North Carolina 


Research Publishing Co., 
Los Angeles, Calif 


H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans, 




THE SWANSON SAW SET 

This lightweight, aluminum tool fills the 
need for an on-the-job set. It will set 
an electric saw (6" or 7" in diameter 
with 5 / 8" to 1 " from point to point) in a 
matter of minutes. Simple to use. Guar- 
anteed satisfactory or money back. 
.... See your dealer- or send $3.00 
Full instructions how to set - also 
sharpen without removing blade. 

SWANSON TOOL CO. 
91 1 3 So. 53 rd. Ave. Oak Lawn, 111. 



If you do not have a SWANSON SPEED SQUARE AND RAFTER 
BOOK, ORDER ONE TODAY. The handiest square on the market 



125 



POST 
PAID 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




M M. ^1 M ▼ M. Lhhhm I ▼ M ^^^^ M. m. Jt .# %. 1 ▼ M. 



L. U. NO. 12, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Lamirande, Arthur 

L. U. NO. 15, HACKENSACK, N. J. 
Dahl, John B. 

L. U. NO. 16, SPRINGFIELD, ILL 

Prince, George 
Watts, Arthur V. 

L. U. NO. 35, SAN RAFAEL, CAL 

Olsen, Arthur 
Schroeder, John 

L. U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 
Fillmore, Willard 

L. U. NO. 44, CHAMPAIGN-URBANA, ILL. 
Cloud, Roy 

L. U. NO. 72, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Lehrer, Alfred 
Miraglia, Mike 

L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MO. 

Adkins, L. McKinley 
Michael, Walter 

L. U. NO. 104, DAYTON, OHIO 

Avery, T. B. 
Berndt, Emil William 
Ferree, Claude 
Lawson, Clarence Sr. 
Trout, George 
Whaley, Clarence 

L. U. NO. 195, PERU, JLL. 
Wallace, Guy 

L. U. NO. 22G, PORTLAND, ORE. 

Bohlmann, Otto 
Buickerood, George 
Coupe, J. J. 
Evans, F. J. 
Fowler, Fred 



Gjerve, Andrew 
Goodding, H. W. 
Gray, Clifford 
Jacobsen, S. 
McGowan, James W. 
Michaelis. Charles W. 
Ostling, Charles 
Smith, Allen N. 

L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Catania, Patsy 
Zakaroff, Basil 

L. U. NO. 281, BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 
Mahoney, William H. 

L. U. NO. 298, LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. 

Cutney, John 
Koske, Reynold 
Lorange, Albert H. 

L. U. NO. 393, CAMDEN, N. J. 

Baldwin, William H. 
Cook, William 
Emig, George F. 
Matthieson, Adolph L. 
Powell, Robert 

L. U. NO. 665, AMARILLO, TEXAS 

Chapman. M. L. 
Doty, C. F. 
Feck, John H. Jr. 
Russell, G. L. 

L. U. NO. 710, LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Long. Clarence H. 
Rice, William M. 
Summerville, Charles H. 
Thomas, Zollie 
Tucker, Ralph E. 

L. U. NO. 721, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Anderson, William J. 
Lingquist, Emil M. 
Loeschnigg. Ladeslaus 
Russell, Donald 



Shinafelt, James 
Sorensen, Martin 

L. U. NO. 946, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Chapman, Ray C. 
Easton, F. C. 
Marvin. A. H. 
Schreiber, William C. 
Spiers, E. R. 
Vick. W. R. 

L. U. NO. 982, DETROIT, MICH. 
Lazarger, John 

L U. NO. 1151, BATAVIA, N. Y. 

Ball. James 
Brill. Leo 

L. U. NO. 1164, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Bruno, Frank 
Fetzer. Otto 
Horowitz. Joseph 
Malich. John 
Riconda. Vito 
Rozenblitt. Mark 

L. U. NO. 1394, FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Killian, Joseph 
Nance, M. E. Sr. 
Nein, David 

L. U. NO. 1407, WILMINGTON, CAL. 

Barnes, George E. 
Huffman. Alva L. 



L. U. NO. 1518, GULFPORT, MISS. 
Lang, Theodore R. 

L. U. NO. 1570, MARYSVILLE, CAL. 
McNear, Scott M. 

L. U. NO. 1598, VICTORIA, B.C. 

Chivers, Charles 
Gaiger. Darrel P. 

L. U. NO. 1741, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Lambrecht, Al 
Lehman, Harry 
Ott, Carl 
Schleif, Bernard 
Schomisch, Edward 

L. U. NO. 1772, HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

Knizenski, Joseph 
Marshall, Albert 

L. U. NO. 1835, WATERLOO, IOWA 

Boeger, John 
Welsh, Walter 

L. U. NO. 1846, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Davis, Lewis J. 
Dufrene, John 
Jenkins, Robert H. 
Lauricella, Leo 

L. U. NO. 1862, SPOKANE, WASH. 
Summers, John W. 



L. U. NO. 1423, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. L. U. NO. 1867, REGINA, SASK. 

Mills. J. S. Heseltine, Ralph 

L. U. NO. 1478, REDONDO BEACH, CAL. L. U. NO. 2151, CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Anderson, Robert C. Hembree, J. S. 



L.U. NO. 1511, SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. 
Schrader. Ted 

L. U. NO. 1513, DETROIT, MICH. 
Gray. Robie H. 



L. U. NO. 2203, ANAHEIM, CAL. 
James. Eugene I. 

L. U. NO. 3154, MONTICELLO, IND. 
Payne, Clifford 



LOCAL 7 MEMBER TAKEN BY DEATH 



John H. Bakken 
1888-1961 

John H. Bakken, member of Local 
7, Minneapolis, Minn, died on Febru- 
ary 16, 1961. The 73-year-old vet- 
eran union official served four decades 
in the labor movement. 



The Minneapolis Tribune and the 
area labor papers paid full tribute to 
Brother Bakken's service to labor. A 
native of Norway, he emigrated in 
1904 and was a resident of Minne- 
apolis 53 years. He joined Local 7 in 
1921. He later served as Recording 
Secretary of the Local. In 1942 he 



became a Business Representative of 
the Twin City Council. He also served 
as a charter member of the Minnesota 
Building Trades Council, secretary of 
the joint employer-union apprentice- 
ship program and secretary of the 
board of trustees of the Carpenters 
health and welfare program. 



JUNE, 1961 



19 



V :: H 




By FRED GOETZ 



Potomac Catch 

John E. Lynch of 4532 Taney Ave- 
nue, Alexandria, Virginia, says he has 




the best fishing of his life when the 
perch and herring run come up the 
Potomac river. 

This photo of John with a nice 
string from around the Chain Bridge 
area proves his point. 

Marriage Preserver 

A recent letter was received from 
a disillusioned "fisherman's widow." 
She is left home each week end dur- 
ing most of the summer months while 
her angling husband goes off to the 
lakes and streams with his buddies. 

A house that was started with fire 
and enthusiasm has been in a half- 
finished stage for years, neglected and 
ignored. 

Were it not for her talent as 
plumber and electrician the old home- 
stead would hardly be livable. 

She says she has lost her interest 
in fishing — and fish. 

Unfortunately, there are many like 
her in the same boat on a becalmed 
sea. 

A good friend of mine and fishing 



buddy had a problem like this. It 
became a sore spot, festered and 
could have ended in the divorce courts 
were it not for a bit of advice from 
another friend who developed what he 
calls "the point system." For each day 
he spends a' fishing, he pledges a day 
at home — fixing the fence, mowing the 
lawn, etc. All is calm and serene at 
their house now; there's still plenty 
of fish and game in the deep freeze 
and whenever possible the whole 
family goes a' fishing. 

Big Job for Us All 

Following is a quotation from the 
renowned conservationist, DurwOod 
L. Allen: 

"Cleaning up rampant ills of the 
land and recovering our drainage ways 
from deliberate expropriation as a 
sewer is the biggest job in fish and 
wildlife management. 

"Compared with this major under- 
taking, whatever else we do is of 
minor consequence." 

Wicker Creel Praised 

Here are a few things I'd like to 
get off my chest about the value of 
fish creels: 

First off, don't be persuaded by 
some high-powered advertising to store 
your fish in the rubber pocket of a 
fishing jacket, or in a plastic fish bag. 

Rubber draws and holds heat like 
few materials do. Like any material 
that doesn't permit free circulation of 
air, it will contribute to speedy decay 
of your catch. Plastic holds slime and 
smell. 

That is why the time-honored wick- 
er creel is the ideal carrier for your 
fish. The willow basket allows for free 
circulation. 

There are some canvas creels on 
the market with screen bottoms to 
permit free circulation but I, person- 
ally, prefer the good old-fashioned 
wicker. 



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to make joints • Carpenters" arithmetic • Solving men- 
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With Coupon and We Pay Shipping Charges. 



Accurate, Easy 




for FLOO 
FOOTIN 



The old reliable water level is now modernized 
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Stop wasting time and money on makeshift 
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HYDROLEVEL 




\fIRST IN 



925 DeSoto Ave., Ocean Springs, Mississipp 

LIQUID LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 



y 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Recalls "Old Days" 

A letter in our files tells of a 1912 
California combination "fish and 
hunt" license. 




Those were the "good old days" 
when you could acquire this combina- 
tion-permit to fish and hunt for a 
buck, and there was still an open sea- 
son on the prairie chicken — five per 
day. 

The general deer season started in 



August and ran until October and the 
poor persecuted hunter could take but 
five deer per season. 

Carpenter H. E. Pugh of 3414 NE 
44th Avenue, Portland, a member of 
Local 226, Oregon, recalls the good 
old days and has a page from his 
hunting memory book that tells of a 
successful hunt in 1936 — six hunters 
and six deer, three of which are shown 
in the photo, all four point. 

Brother Pugh is on the photo at 
left kneeling forward of the buck 
he downed in the high country around 
Bend, Oregon. 



A Slight Correction 

In a recent edition of Outdoor Me- 
anderings we told about a hunter Val 
Luczynski who lives in Muskego, Wis- 
consin and is a member of Local 1573 
out of West Allis. We mentioned that 
Val had downed a 160 pound buck 
(field dressed) with a 300 Savage rifle, 
a long shot at 100 yards. Somehow 
we got our statistics on this story a 
bit tangled, and Val informs us that 
he was not using a 300 Savage rifle, 
but a Mannlicher-Schonauer, 30/06 
caliber. The deer was shot in the 



back of the head, not the lungs, and 
it dressed out at 120 pounds, not 160. 
Sorry about this, Val, I checked 
back but cannot locate the letter from 
which I derived the information. 
Hope the aforegoing clears up the 

matter. 

* * * 

High-Priced Fish 

Commercial fishing for striped bass 
is against the law in California, and 
yet court records have shown where it 
is possible to get a serving of this tasty 
sea food if you know the right guy. 

Recently one of these bootleggers 
was caught. The judge — probably a 
sport fisherman — really threw the 
book at the culprit. As a matter of 
fact he threw a volume: a $1,500 fine! 

Seems like the culprit tried to dis- 
pose of 200 pounds of striped bass for 
$76 to — of all people — an undercover 
agent for the California Fish and 
Game Department. 

Golly, what a high price to pay for 
fish these days — $75 per pound. 

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21 




THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and 
published. Send along your pet trick 
for making a job easier. It can earn 
you five dollars and the gratitude of 
your fellow members. Include a rough 
sketch from which we can make a 
drawing. When the same idea is sub- 
mitted by more than one reader, the 
letter bearing the earliest postmark 
will be awarded the check. 



Handy Tool 



A good tool for removing trim and 
other items which are to be used 




again can be made from an old car 
spring. Cut it about 10 inches long 
and then grind the pointed end to a 
slim taper. It can also be used as a 
pry and as a lever which does not leave 
marks. 

T. W. Berg 

1 1 22 Mission Road 

San Antonio 10, Texas 



Finger Saver 

Here's a trick an old timer showed 
me. 

I was doing "flat finish" (nailing sub- 
flooring) with oiled nails. The polished 
hammer head tended to slip off the 




oiled nail heads and bop my left 
thumb. In irritation I told my partner 
that I wished I had a corrugated ham- 
mer head — even though they could be 
painful finger-mashers. 

He smiled and reached for my ham- 
mer, then took out of his side pocket 
an old file. He tapped the hammer 
head smartly with the edge of the 
file until he covered the area with a 
pattern of tiny nicks. 

Worked fine. No slippage — no 
smashed fingers. 

Louis Luck 

(L. U. 1052) 

8564 Melrose Ave. 

Los Angeles 46, Calif. 

Handy Cutting Guide 

Here's a trick for using in cutting 
plywood, remodeling doors, etc., with 
handsaw to avoid rough and broken 
edges. 

First make your marking with 
pencil or snapline. Then cover the 
marking with cellophane tape and 
then do your cutting right through. 
You will have perfect sharp and clear 
edges. 

Alje Olson 
1921 E. 86th st. 
Chicago 17, 111. 

Easier Saw Sharpening 

I would like to add a suggestion to 
your "Short-Cuts" department and 
mine is on how to sharpen a handsaw 
more easily. 

Blacken both sides of the saw be- 
fore you begin sharpening it. If you 
have to joint it, blacken it after it is 
jointed. It is much easier to see what 
you are doing. And if you are in- 
terrupted while in the process of 
sharpening, you can easily detect 
where you left off before the inter- 
ruption. 

To blacken effectively a candle can 
be used; a rag (on wire) soaked in 
diesel oil is also satisfactory. 
Joe B. Arterberry 
1550 North 19th st. 
Grand Junction, Colo. 



See Glue Marks before Finish 

Use of the new white glues has 
created a problem in that any residual 
which is left and has been wiped is 
difficult to see until you apply your 
finish. To avoid this, I suggest that 
you add food coloring (mostly brown) 
to the glue. The color then shows on 
the wood and you can readily tell that 
all the glue has not been removed. 

Herbert Zurfluh, 
Financial Secretary 

(L. U. 2001, La Crosse) 

710 Madison St. 

Onalaska, Wise. 

Drill That "Stays Put" 

I'd like to pass on a tip. To keep a 
push drill from rolling away while 
you're working with it, remove the 
pin at the handle and replace it with 
a longer pin cut from an 8d nail. Let 
this pin extend about 1/8" beyond the 
handle. When the drill is placed on a 
ladder or window sill it won't roll off. 

John S. Paino 

436 Wildwood Road 

Northvale, N. J. 



Books That Will Help You 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 iL, covering 
general house carpentry, estimating, making win- 
dow and door frames, heavy timber framing, 
trusses, power tools, and other important building 
subjects. $3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 
p. 670 iL, and about 7,000 building trades terms 
and expressions. Defines terms and gives many 
practical building suggestions. You need this 
book. $4.00. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool explained. One of the top-best of my books 
— you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 iL 
$3.50. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p., 498 iL. 
covering all important steel-square problems. The 
most practical book on the square sold today. 
Price $3.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 iL, covering 
several of the most important branches of car- 
pentry, among them garages, finishing and stair 
building. $3.50. 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 iL, covering 
every branch of roof framing. The best roof 
framing book on the market. Other problems, 
including saw filing. $3.50. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
practical building problems — many of them worth 
the price of the book. Has 256 p. and 686 il. 
$3.50. 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION.— Has 163 P., 439 
iL, covering concrete work, form building, screeds, 
reinforcing, scaffolding and other temporary con- 
struction. No other book like it on the market. 
$3.50. 

You can't go wrong if you buy this whole set. 
A five-day money-back guarantee, is your protec- 
tion. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetrv. Only $1.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Revised, illus- 
trated by Stanley Leland. Only $2.00. 

THE WAILING PLACE.— This book is made up 
of controversial prose and the fable PUSHING 
BUTTONS. Spiced witli sarcasm and dry humor. 
Illustrated by the famed artist. Will Rapport. 
$3.00. 

FREE.— With 8 books, THE WALLING PLACE 
and 2 poetry books free; with 5 books, 2 poetry 
books free and with 3 hooks, 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 hooks, THE WALLING PLACE for $1.00. 
and with 1 book, a poetry hook for half price. 

NOTICE. — Carrying charges paid only when full 
remittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to 
Canada. 

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Today. ■"■• n. 9ICUCLC Emporia, Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Roll-On Cement 

Have you ever tried smearing 
asphalt cement between layers of a 
half-lap roof with a stick spreader or 
broom? If you have, I'm sure you 
will appreciate my method of spread- 
ing the cement with a paint roller. It 
can be a discarded roller and can be 
used over and over, job after job. 
Even in cool fall or spring weather it 
can be rolled evenly. You will find the 
job can be done much more eco- 
nomically too. 

Harold Noffsinger 
(L. U. 1889, Downers 
Grove) 

412 S. Columbia St. 
Naperville, 111. 

Sash Weights 

To get proper weight without scales 
for 1 % " pine window sash with single 
strength glass, simply multiply the 
glass width by the length. For ex- 
ample, take a glass 20" x 20". Multi- 
ply 20" x 20". That gives you 400 
square inches. A one-pound weight 
will balance 100 square inches of 
single strength glass plus sash. So a 
20" x 20" sash would be balanced by 
a four-pound weight. A 30" x 30" 
sash would add up to 900 square 
inches, thus requiring a nine-pound 
weight to balance. 



As a weight should be one-half 
pound heavier than the sash, add a 
half pound to your square inches of 
glass. Any small difference will be 
in the nature of the wood. 

Fred S. Hotchkiss 

613 W. 1st St. 

Coffeyville, Kansas 



Expendable Workers 

(Continued from page 18) 

ington where a federal unit (marketing 
area) is in effect. This is the rule 
which applies to all the national forest 
timber in Alaska. Essentially the same 
policy applies to all the publicly 
owned timber in British Columbia. 

We congratulate the Oregon Legis- 
lature for passing a bill which estab- 
lishes a marketing area requiring pri- 
mary processing of state owned timber 
within the United States. We trust 
the Governor, despite his earlier state- 
ments, will sign this bill. No one with 
any concern for the economic welfare 
of Oregon could honestly oppose this 
measure. 

The big task is to get the United 
States Departments of Interior and 
Agriculture to establish reasonable 
marketing areas for federal timber. 
We hope that they will look into this 
matter before a further major disrup- 
tion occurs in the employment of lum- 



ber and plywood workers in the 
Pacific Northwest. We think it should 
be possible for the Secretaries of those 
Departments to figure out ways in 
which competition for timber can be 
retained within the Douglas Fir region 
without subjecting the industry to un- 
fair subsidized competition from 
abroad. 

We do not think that the answer 
lies in removing the marketing area 
protections from Alaska — although 
admittedly it makes no sense to have 
them there and not down here. We 
think the Federal Departments should 
accept the policy laid down by the 
Legislature of the State of Oregon. 
The natural resources of this country 
should be regarded as our basic 
source of wealth, and they should be 
processed by American workers under 
decent wages and working conditions 
for the benefit of the entire com- 
munity. 



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DEALERS: Write For Quantity Prices 

CLINE-SIGMON, Publishers 

Department 60 
P. O. Box 367 Hickory. N. C. 



JUNE, 1961 



23 




This column is devoted to introducing 
new developments in materials and prod- 
ucts to our members. The articles are 
presented merely to inform our readers, 
and their publication is not to be con- 
strued as an indorsement, since all the 
information is based on claims made by 
the makers. Those interested in obtain- 
ing further details regarding any product 
are requested to write to the company 
rather than to THE CARPENTER or 
the General Office. 

First New Mail Box in 50 Years 

A new ruggedly built, modern de- 
sign, rural and suburban mail box has 
received the approval of the Post- 
master General. This is the first 
change in mail box design and con- 
struction approved in over 50 years, 
according to the manufacturer, South- 
ern Fabricators. 




It has a glass-smooth acrylic finish, 
baked on-heavy duty, zinc coated 
steel. A chrome-plated protective hood 
surrounds the door. 

It's made in 5 colors — blue, tur- 
quoise, thunderbird white, chocolate 
and surburban pink. 

The box is available with a swivel 
mounting bracket and angling support 
pole that minimizes the danger of 
autos and other vehicles hitting the 
pole. 

For further information write to 
Southern Fabricators, 1010 Broadway, 
Steeleville, Illinois. 



New Lock for Screen Doors 

A new lock for screen doors is be- 
ing introduced by the Lock Division, 
Dexter Industries, Inc. 



53S**\ 




The new lock, Dexter's No. 1 1 60, 
has a 1%" diameter tulip shaped 
knob designed to match tulip shape 
of Dexter entrance and interior lock- 
set knobs. It also features a ruggedly 
designed lever, styled in sturdy simple 
lines for massive look and solid grip. 

Roses of the new lock are V/s" 
diameter, designed to match the larger 
roses of Dexter's newest locksets. A 
simple, foolproof slide lock is 
mounted in the inside rose. 

Besides these features, the No. 1 1 60 
has a safety strike with an exclusive 
well in lip to keep the door latched 
when not fully closed. The new lock 
is completely reversible for outswing- 
ing and inswinging doors and is avail- 
able in polished brass, polished 
chrome, satin bronze, satin black and 
satin chrome. 

For further information write to 
Dexter Lock Division, Dexter Indus- 
tries, Inc., Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Glamor in the Kitchen 

Ajax Hardware Corp. has created 
a new fashion in "kitchen jewelry". 
They offer a oval shaped cabinet pull 
and knob. This matched contempo- 
rary set will dress up any kitchen 
cabinet or kitchen drawers. Seven 
finishes are available — old copper, 
polished copper, dull bronze, dull 
black, polished chrome and dull 




chrome. Made of triple-plated virgin 
zamak, the new pull has a 3Vi inch 
center and measures 5!/s inches over- 
all length. The knob is V2 inch by 
2V& inches. 

For information write to Ajax 
Hardware Corp., 825 South Ajax 
Ave., City of Industry, Cal. 

Hang On to the Window 

A nine-pound tubular steel win- 
dow scaffolding that supports up to 
60 times its weight has been developed 
by Newark Ladder & Bracket Co., 
Clark, N. J. 

Called "Windowstep", the scaffold- 
ing is designed to hook over any 
standard window sill. Its construction 
features include an 1 1" x 21" working 
platform with over 500-pound capac- 
ity; a special built-in guard rail for 
complete safety; and rubber bumpers 
at all contact points to prevent mar- 
ring of wall surfaces. 

The "Windowstep" is priced at 
$13.85, F. O. B., Clark, N. J. For a 
free catalog write to Newark Ladder 
& Bracket Co., Clark, N. J. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 



Six Apprentice Conferences Scheduled 



Six regional and state apprenticeship 
conferences are scheduled for 1961. 
These meetings are sponsored by em- 
ployer and labor groups, assisted by 
State Apprenticeship Agencies and the 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing of the U. S. Department of Labor. 
Objectives are: 

1. To develop added interest in 
Apprenticeship and Training. 
To provide an opportunity for 
groups and individuals training 
apprentices to meet, discuss mu- 
tual problems, exchange ideas 



2. 



and techniques. 

3. To view exhibits of 

(a) Latest training aids 

(b) Training materials 

4. To hear national employer and 
labor leaders present their ideas 
on apprenticeship and training. 

A listing for the seven conferences 
for 1961 by date, city and headquar- 
ters is reprinted below. 

For additional information, call or 
write the U. S. Department of Labor, 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing office in your area. 



Schedule 

1961 MULTI-STATE APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING 

CONFERENCE DATES 



CONFERENCE— CITY— HOTEL 



DATE 



1 7th Annual 

EASTERN SEABOARD APPRENTICESHIP 
CONFERENCE 

Manchester, Vermont — Equinox House (Fee $2.00) June 5-6-7-8, 1961 

1 3th Annual 

SOUTHERN STATES APPRENTICESHIP 
CONFERENCE 

Jackson, Mississippi — Heidelberg Hotel 

Theme: "Apprenticeship — America's Challenge" 
(Fee— Delegates $10.00; Ladies, $7.50; 
Children $2.50) 

4th Biennial 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES APPRENTICE- 
SHIP AND TRAINING CONFERENCE 
Baltimore, Maryland — Lord Baltimore Hotel 

2nd Biennial 

NORTH CENTRAL STATES APPRENTICESHIP 
AND TRAINING CONFERENCE 

Chicago, Illinois — Conrad Hilton Hotel 
(Fee in advance $12.50. At conference $15.00 

Ladies $7.50) Oct. 26-27, 1961 

1961 STATE APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING CONFERENCES 



July 27-28-29, 1961 



Sept. 24-28, 1961 



3rd Annual 

FLORIDA APPRENTICESHIP CONFERENCE 

Jacksonville, Florida — Hotel George Washington 

1 1th Annual 

OHIO STATE APPRENTICESHIP CONFERENCE 

Toledo, Ohio — Commodore Perry Hotel 



June 15-17, 1961 



Oct. 31 -Nov. 1-2. 1961 



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JUNE, 196 1 



25 




UNION 



I 



Boston Honors Old Timers 




Local 157, Boston, Mass., has given 50-year pins to its 
veteran members. 

Left to right, back row standing: O. Belsky and I. Cohen, 
present and past presidents in the act of presenting the pin; 
Goldfarb; F. Riskin; S. Masserman and I. Cohen. Front row, 
left to right: S. Katz, K. Goldberg, Peter A. Reilly, Secretary, 
District Council, Boston; M. Shnider; L. Kremerman and J. 
Rubin. Others who received their pins are J. Adelman; N. 
Arkin; M. Glazer; S. Sosman; S. Peris; J. Price; A. Shapiro; 
I. Spitz; M. Wolf and S. Gosman. 



Carpenters Help History 

The members of the Brotherhood in Colorado Springs 
have lent a hand to helping preserve state's history. 

Colorado's original Statehouse has been resting on the 
Capitol grounds in Denver for some time. The State His- 
torical Society recently gave the old structure to the Pikes 
Peak Historical Society to be placed near its original site. 
Through the donated efforts of the Carpenters and other 
labor groups the move to the new site was made. 

Shown are a view of the old Capitol and one of the 
"free" workers, Brother William S. Shepard, member of 
Local 55. 




It Is 6 Years Later 

Brother Fred Weber, Local 3025, Chicago, receives his 
Carpenters' emblem after completing his 6 years appren- 
ticeship. President Emerald Bilas makes the presentation. 

The members of the Executive Board of Local 3025 
were on hand. From left to right are Brothers W. 
Latchem, Treasurer; R. Livermore, Financial Secretary; 
Weber; President Bilas; A. Dombe, Recording Secretary, 
and E. Mehok, vice-president. 




Three Stand Tall in Texas 




Representatives of Local 1822, Ft. Worth, and three 
50-year members are shown here on the presentation of 
50-year pins. Front row, left to right, Henry Lusher, 
George E. Hardy and Earl Carroll, the veteran members. 
Second row, left to right, Talbott Eagle, Trustee, Brother 
Bill Knudsen, and Paul T. Nelson, President. Third row, 
left to right, James Walker, Executive Committee member, 
and Melvin L. Butler, Financial Secretary. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




Brother Harry J. Dietz, President of Local 1996, Liberty- 
ville, III., was honored at a Spring banquet by some 600 mem- 
bers and friends. 

Brother Ted Kenny, President of the District Council, 
presented Brother Dietz with an engraved ring. 

Left to right, Brother Oscar Firnbach, 25-year member, 
trustee; Brother Charles Thompson, Secretary-Treasurer of the 



District Council; Brother Paul Schuler, 25-year member; 
Brother Dietz; Brother Ruppert Sundell, 25-year member; 
Brother Kenny; Brother Willis Towner, Recording Secretary; 
Brother Steve McDonald, representing his father, George 
McDonald, past Financial Secretary; Brother Russell Mears, 
25-year member, and Brother Leo A. Dorfler, Financial Sec- 
retary. 



Brother Barbour Honored 




Local 721, Los Angeles, Cal., has honored Brother E. J. 
Barbour for his long and distinguished service to the 
Brotherhood. At recent ceremonies he received an en- 
graved watch and a plaque. 

Reading left to right are William Sidell, President, Cabi- 
net Makers and Millmen, Local 721. Brother Sidell is also 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Los Angeles District Council of 
Carpenters; Brother Barbour and J. F. Cambiano, 8th Dis- 
trict Board Member. 

L.U. 1491 President Retires 

When Brother Daniel J. D. Millard recently retired as 
president of Local Union 1491, Royersford, Pennsylvania, 
the membership of the union deemed it fitting to pay 
tribute to his thirty-two years of faithful service. 

The contributions of Brother Millard to the welfare of 
the union over the years has been a saga of dedication 
and devotion to duty. And the entire membership of the 
union wishes him many years of health and happiness in 
retirement. 



Newton is 73 

Local 275, Newton, Mass., has celebrated its 73rd birth- 
day. On this occasion the members of the Local honored 
Brother Angus McLean who has been a member of the 
Local for 62 years. 

Brother McLean held the office of Business Representa- 
tive for many years. He is Treasurer of the Local at the 
present time. 




Pictured, left to right, are John Kelleher, Vice-President 
and toastmaster; James Donovan. President; Angus 
McLean; Harry Hogan, General Representative of the 
Brotherhood; Edward Gallagher, Business Representative 
for the Newton District; and Edward Cunniffe. President 
of the District Council of Newton and vicinity. 



Spongberg Gets His Pin 

Brother Albert Spongberg has received his 50-year 
membership pin. He was initiated in Local 62, Chicago 
nearly 58 years ago. He moved to Tucson in 1948. Local 
857, Tucson, presented him with his pin. 



JUNE, 1961 



27 



Thirteen Reach Fifty 

Local 595, Lynn, Mass. recently gave a testimonial din- 
ner in honor of 13 of their members who have reached 
the 50-year mark as members of the Brotherhood. 




General Representative Harry Hogan presented pins to 
8 of the 13 who were present. In the front row, left to 
right, Jerry Calnan, President, Lynn Labor Council; Harry 
Hogan; Hervey Bray, President, Local 595; Wilfred Bes- 
sett, 50 years; Charles Salois, 53 years. Second row, left 
to right, Fred C. MacLean, 52 years; J. Mande Romain, 
54 years; Reedy Comeau, 51 years; Milton Dinsome, 53 
years; Alfred A. Snow, 54 years, and Arthur Warren, 50 
years. 

Not able to be on hand for the dinner were Brothers 
Hans Anderson, 50 years; Thomas Dedrick, 58 years; 
Esterre Deveau, 51 years; Richard Hearey, 56 years, and 
Alexander Malett, 56 years. 



Anaheim is Host to State Convention 

To the Editor: 

On February 14 the Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary of the 
California State Council opened their 18th Annual Con- 
vention at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim. The event 
marked the first time the Council has convened at Ana- 
heim. Area women who took an active part as delegates 
were: 

From Santa Ana — Mrs. O. A. Miles, Mrs. Wayne Han- 
sen and Mrs. Esther Leonhardt. Costa Mesa — Mrs. Jo 
Fight and Mrs. Gertrude LePage. Anaheim — Mrs. John 
Virgo, Mrs. Fred Roberts and Mrs. Chris Easton. 

Speeches occupied the early part of the program. Guest 
speakers were: Margaret Thornburgh, western director for 
the Women's Activities Department of the AFL-CIO's 
COPE, and Mrs. Ann Draper, international representative 
of the Cap and Millinery Workers Union. 

Following this, the delegates to the convention (which 
was held in conjunction with the conclave of the Carpen- 
ters State Council) retired to their own quarters for the 
individual auxiliary meetings. Highlight of the evening 
was the Grand Ball at the Disneyland Hotel. 

The afternoon of February 15 was left open for the 
delegates to tour Disneyland. The following day's special 
event was a luncheon held in the Magnolia Room of the 
Gourmet Restaurant. Featured at the luncheon was a 
fashion show with the latest in spring fashions displayed. 
More than 200 guests were in attendance. February 17 
saw the installation of new state officers and the closing 
ceremonies of the convention. The jcjwly elected officers 
are: 

President, Mrs. Rudy Goodwin of Tujuna; vice presi- 



dent, Mrs. Velma Lane, Palo Alto; secretary, Mrs. Ethel 
Todd, Ventura; treasurer, Mrs. Bonnie Hansen, Santa Ana; 
board members, Ida Marie Hiatt, San Diego (District 1); 
Gerthilde Schafer, San Pedro (District 2); Louise Taylor, 
Oxnard (District 3); Gladys Hindmarsh, Fremont (Dis- 
trict 5); Nettie McNew, Marysville (District 6). 

Cooperation from all concerned made this convention 
a huge success, but special commendation is due to the 
auxiliaries of southern California who did their utmost to 
make it so. 

Mrs. Cecilia F. Cennamo, 
Publicity Chairman, Aux. 759 
11821 Nearing Dr., Anaheim, Calif. 



Reports 



To the Editor: 

On March 20, Ladies Auxiliary No. 658 affiliated with 
the AFL-CIO Auxiliaries. We would urge all our sister 
auxiliaries to affiliate in order to expand locally and help 
their union. 

On April 17, we were presented a new 50-star flag by 
Mr. Sidney Holder of the General Gorgas Post No. 1, 
American Legion. Those who attended the presentation 
were: Eunice Nelson, president; Mildred Pennington, sec- 
retary; Frances Prince, financial-secretary; Susan Hodge, 
chaplain; June Moore, treasurer; Patsy Passmore, warder; 
Bernice Sellers. Hattie Lentz, and members of Local Union 
103. 

We will be looking forward to reading about our auxil- 
iary news as well as news of others in your future issues. 

June W. Moore, Treasurer 
1810 North 7th Ave. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Two Win in Toronto 

Robert Reid, B.R. of the Toronto & District Council 
and Rec. Sec. of Local 27, Toronto, Ont., Canada, present- 
ing shields (and $50.00 cash to the winner, Henry Lein) 
to the two best apprentices out of a graduating class of 32. 




Reading from left to right: Trade School Instructor, Pat 
O'Keefe, also member of Local 27; Jack Stirling, Trade 
School Instructor, member of Local 27; Robert Reid, 
Henry Lein of Harrow, Ont., and James Oliver of Kings- 
ton, Ont., (winners); Alex Beverly, Department Head of 
Trades School — Building Trades Department, also mem- 
ber of Local 27. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



99 Graduate in Detroit 




Shown in Detroit receiving a certificate of completion from 
Head Instructor Stuart Proctor is Arthur W. Kraft. Pictured 
from left to right, are Finlay C. Allan, special assistant to 



General President Maurice Hutcheson; Proctor; L. M. "Boots'" 
Weir, District Council Secretary-Treasurer; Kraft and Edward 
Ellis, chairman of the Joint Apprentice Committee. 



Ninety-nine carpentry graduates of 
the Detroit Apprentice Training 
School were recently honored at the 
15th annual graduation banquet spon- 
sored by the Detroit Carpentry Joint 
Apprentice Committee. 

The affair was held in Cobo Hall in 
honor of the graduates who have com- 
pleted four years of intensive training 
preparation for careers as building 
tradesmen. Of the graduating class, 
92 belonged to the Carpenter locals 
and seven to Millwrights Local 1102. 
All are affiliated with the Carpenters 
District Council. 

Keynote addresses were delivered by 
Finlay C. Allan, special assistant to 
General President Maurice Hutcheson 
and L. M. "Boots" Weir, District 
Council Secretary-Treasurer. 

Both Allan and Weir advised the 
new journeymen to play active roles 
in their unions as a means of bettering 
their way of life. Allan also gave a 
brief history of the apprenticeship 
movement and reminded the audience 
that carpentry is among the oldest 
trades. "There were more carpenters 
on the Mayflower than members of 
any other trade or profession," he said. 



Local 341 Honors 48 Members 




Local 341, Lyons, III. has presented 
5 of its members with 50-year pins 
and 43 members with 25-year pins. 
The presentations were made recently 
by Brother Ted Kenney. President of 
the Chicago District Council. Follow- 
ing the presentation the members of 
the Local and their wives were enter- 
tained at dinner. In the picture above 
are Mr. John A. Spyhala, President 
Local #341. who received his 25- 
year pin from Mr. Ted Kenney, 



President. Chicago District Council. 
Reading from left to right. Frank 
Dorobial, warden. Local #341: Henry 
Strong, financial secretary. Local 
#341; John Spyhala. president. Local 
#341; Ted Kenney, president. Chi- 
cago District Council: Frank Yarosz 
Wee president. Local #341: Charles 
Klopack, treasurer. Local #341, and 
the late Charles Rahozka, recording 
sec, Local #341 who passed on a few 
weeks ago. 



JUNE, 1961 



29 



Toronto Local Holds Testimonial Dinner 




Executive Board Member Brother Andrew V. Cooper, right, presents 50-year mem- 
bership pins to Brother Robert Mackenzie, left, and Brother John Nicol, middle. The 
veterans are members of Local 27, Toronto, Canada. 



This year, for the first time, Local 
27, Toronto, Canada, held a testi- 
monial dinner for its veteran members. 
Local 27 is the second oldest local 
union of the Brotherhood in Canada. 

Nearly 70 old-timers were present. 
Among those honored were Brother 
Robert MacKenzie, 57 years a mem- 
ber and Brother John Nicol, 51 years 



a member. Local 27 also has three 
other members who have over 50 
years of membership. They are 
Brothers Dave Donnelly, William 
Dunn and Fred Hawes. Following 
very close behind in number of years 
of service come Brother Ted Jackson 
and Brother Archie Carmichael, who 
will complete their 50th year this May. 



Ontario Auxiliary 
Submits Prize Slogan 

To the Editor: 

We were fortunate in our Labor 
Day celebration this year in that our 
Auxiliary No. 740 of Port Arthur, 
Ontario, won a prize for our slogan: 
"Strive to Strengthen our Society." 

The slogan appeared on our float 
in the parade. Over seventy boxes of 
blue and yellow kleenex tissues were 
made into flowers to decorate the 
float. 

Coming events include a social- 
dance on October 14, a rummage sale 
on October 22, and our Christmas 
bazaar, November 26. 

It is very interesting to read THE 
CARPENTER, especially the activi- 
ties of other auxiliaries. And we wish 
you and them the best in the future. 
Yours truly, 
Mrs. M. K. Randle, 
Recording Secretary 
115 Prospect Ave. 
Port Arthur, Ont., 
Canada 



Local 959 Gives Pins 



2-BAG SPLIT-LEG 
LEATHER WAIST APRON 




Local 959 held at testimonial dinner to present 25 and 50 year pins to veteran 
members. 

Shown above, left to right, Don Wilton, President; W. E. Shook, 50 years; 
Ray Wilcox, 48 years; and Robert McDonald, Business Agent. 

25-year pins were given to Ray Dumont, James Miner and Kenneth Wilcox. 

Harvey F. Oyer, Sr., a charter member; Harry Offerman and John Klep received 
their pins later. 



Don't Forget to Write 



In every sense The Carpenter is 
a service magazine. It has only one 
purpose and that is to serve the mem- 
bers of the Brotherhood. In recent 
months we have been trying to make 
it a more attractive, more readable 
magazine. We hope you like the new 
features and new departments. Let 
us hear from you. Particularly we 
want to hear of the activities in the 
Locals. If you have pictures taken at 
special events let us have them — and 



be sure and include full name of each 
person who appears in the picture. 

Stories in which the Locals or the 
individual members take part in com- 
munity activities are especially news- 
worthy. If your Local or the mem- 
bers contribute time and talent to a 
worthy community project send us the 
details. 

The address: The Carpenter, 222 
East Michigan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
The Editor 



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30 



THE CARPENTER 



Birthday Party Is a Gala Affair 




The Millwright and Machinery Erectors, Local 740, Brooklyn, N. Y., recently celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the granting 
of the Local Charter. The Brothers, their wives and friends all gathered at a ball given at Manhattan Center in New York City. 




Carpenter Ladies Auxiliary No. 23 
of St. Louis, Missouri, has presented 
picnic tables, benches, and six alumi- 
num chairs to the Mary Ryder Home 
for Elderly Women at 4341 West- 
minster, St. Louis. These tables and 
chairs were bought from proceeds of 
a recent card party. 

Shown in the picture are those 
assembled at the presentation. Read- 
ing from left to right, seated, are Mrs. 



Dorothy Boden, the auxiliary presi- 
dent; Mary Ryder; and Mrs. Helen 
Wind, vice president. Standing: Mrs. 
Hannah Georges, trustee; Mrs. Rex 
Stocker. financial secretary; Mrs. Lou 
Krehmeyer; Mrs. Georganne Krum- 
pelman, recording secretary; Mrs. 
Vida Inzer: Miss Minnie Ruhle; Mrs. 
Mable Zumivalt, chaplain, and Mrs. 
Laura Aumann, warden. 



Canadian Local Meets 



Local 2995 of The Lumber & Saw- 
mill Workers Union, Kapuskasing, 
Ontario, held a convention earlier this 
year. Brother A. V. Cooper, 9th Dis- 
trict Board Member of the United 



Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, was the banquet 
speaker. Thirty-eight delegates were 
present representing 19 companies and 
3500 members. 



Officer Likes Way 
Unions Operate 

In Washington, D. C, an Air Force 
scientist, Major Theodore C. Kahn, 
resigned from the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science 
because it refused to act like a mili- 
tant trade union. 

In his resignation letter, published 
in the organization's magazine. 
Science, Major Kahn declared. 
"Whether or not you like the union 
approach, or whether you feel that it 
goes against the grain of your organi- 
zation to compromise the scientific 
ivory-tower tradition, the fact remains 
that the Ph.D. scientist is not generally 
compensated in our culture for the 
sacrifice, effort and skill that his ex- 
tensive training entails." 

Officers of the 60,000-member As- 
sociation confessed to reporters that 
it wasn't the first time they'd received 
proposals from members to convert 
the AAAS into a union with a collec- 
tive bargaining and grievance-handling 
program. 



T>ROT6CT VOUKSGLF 




WITH TH? UNION CA8CC , 

■ imMJIIl:H»1'l,HM.)M«IM*lH.»J»J^« 



JUNE, 19 6 1 



31 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



Let's Have the Truth 
About the Missile Bases and Work Stoppages 




In recent weeks the press has been filled with stories 
about the construction of U. S. missile bases and alleged 
work stoppages. There have been charges and counter- 
charges. Many citizens have gotten the impression there 
have been deliberate slowdowns by labor and that union 
members have been paid exorbitant wages. Let's set 
the facts straight. 

This entire matter was reviewed in Washington at a 
meeting called by Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg. 
Present were representatives of labor and management. I 
was on hand to speak for our Brotherhood. We all agree 
with the letter President Kennedy sent to the meeting 
in which he said "The security of our nation and the 
lives of each of us are today tied inexorably to our missile 
program and may well depend tomorrow upon what we 
now do in space." 

Despite the urgency of the program there has been a 
substantial loss of man-work days but labor does not bear 
the full responsibility as the headline writers would have 
you believe. As Newsweek Magazine points out in the 
May 20 issue "Some of the evidence brought before the 
Senate Committee looking into these charges is several 



years old and the concerned faults already corrected. 
For example, the exorbitant electrical worker's wages 
that were paid at Cape Canaveral were revised two years 
ago . . . Labor was far from the lone villain of the missile 
lag. As early as last September, Former Secretary of 
Defense Thomas Gates, Jr. said, "We're all to blame. The 
Defense Department, the services, the contractors, labor, 
everybody.' Byron MacNabb, operation manager of Con- 
vair-Astronautics at Cape Canaveral, said, 'There is a 
lack of decision on the part of the government'." 

Following our full days of discussions in Washington 
Secretary Goldberg said to the press, "I met today with 
the representatives of unions, companies, and govern- 
ment agencies involved on our missile sites. Following 
our discussions these men — both union and management 
— pledged their complete support to the President's 
effort to assure uninterrupted and economical work on 
missile sites. ... I will immediately begin to prepare 
recommendations to the President. I shall conduct 
further discussions with the group . . . and my recom- 
mendations will be designed to achieve, as the President 
requested, 'a voluntary and equitable solution to the 
labor-management problem in this vital area, fair to the 
workers, the managements, and the public alike'." 

That's fair enough. Labor asks only its fair share of 
the gain and the blame. To show that we mean business 
the Building Trades Department, AFL-CIO, has en- 
dorsed a 4-point program to handle labor disputes and 
prevent work stoppages. 

In response to our program Secretary of Defense 
Robert McNamara said, "This action reflects responsible 
leadership and sets forth an example of how free labor 
meets an urgent problem involving our nation's security. 
Your response is a tribute to our democratic institutions. 
Labor, as a partner of the armed forces, plays a vital 
role in this complex task of building missile sites . . ." 

Let's get on with the job. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




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Now you flick a switch to get the right sanding action for any production 
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One minute it's a heavy duty orbital sander for fast stock removal (perfect 
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Has plenty other features like an exclusive 3 position front knob that also 
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EB VPi 
IT 




/ 





THE 



CAR 

FOUNDED 1881 




NTER 



-*.-.. ," 



M 



/ 




ERICA 

My country, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing. Land where my 

rather s died! Land of the Pilgrim's pride! From ev'ry mountain side, Let freedom ring! 




W[y native country, thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love. I love thy 

rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills; My heart with rapture thrills Like that above. 

Let music swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song. 




Let mortal tongues awake; Let all that breathe partake; Let rocks their silence break, 

Che sound prolong. Our fathers' God, to Thee, Author of liberty. To Thee we sing. Long may 

>ur land be bright With freedom's holy light; Protect us by Thy might. Great God. our King! 



How to make your 
money grow up 

with your family 




A little at a time makes a lot — when you stick to it. 
Millions of Americans save automatically by buying U.S. 
Savings Bonds through the Payroll Savings Plan. Just 
sign up once, and you'll never worry about saving again. 



The only bills that don't grow 
right along with your kids are 
dollar bills. But you make your 
dollars grow too — by investing 
them in U.S. Savings Bonds. Say 
you start to put $6.25 a week 
into U.S. Savings Bonds when 
your daughter is three years old. 
By the time she's in high school 
— and wants shoes and dresses 
and the beauty shop for herself 
instead of for her doll— you'll 
have close to $3,900 to help you 
meet these "growing-up 
expenses." And over $600 will 
be earned interest. 




Ever see this picture? Probably not very 
often. It's of President Theodore Roosevelt as he 
appears on the largest Series E Bond the public 
may purchase— the $10,000 U.S. Savings Bond. 
Most Bond buyers collect Thomas Jefferson's 
picture. He's on the $50 Bond. Cost: just $37.50. 

Why U.S. Savings Bonds 
Make Good Saving Sense 
• You invest without risk under a 
U.S. Government guarantee . You 
now earn 3%% interest to matu- 
rity • You can save automatically 
on the Payroll Savings Plan . You 
can buy Bonds at any bank • Your 
Bonds are protected against loss, 
fire, even theft • You save more 
than money— you buy shares in a 
stronger America. 




They'll need more than money. They'll need a peaceful world to grow up 
in. U.S. Savings Bonds are shares in a stronger America. Buying them helps 
your country assure freedom's security. 



******** 



/*pntb\ ^ ou save more than money 
■^anniversary | with U.S. Savings Bonds ** 

^Si 1961 / This advertising is donatedby 

***+++*** The Advertising Council and this magazine. 



'«c st** 




THE COVER 

"America" is one of the stirring, patriotic songs that 
Americans have come to love and which they sing on the 
Fourth of July and historic days of the year. The tune 
was composed by Henry Carey, an English musician and 
composer, about 1740. Since about 1745 the same tune 
has been the British anthem and is familiar today to mil- 
lions as "God Save the Queen". 

In 1832, a Yankee minister of the Gospel, Samuel 
Francis Smith, wrote the words that are so much a part of 
our tradition, "My Country, 'tis of thee . . ." He came 
across Carey's tune in an old German song book and put 
the two together in a hymnal. From the first time it was 
sung by a New England congregation "America" was a 
great success. 



@£\Lj3^ 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 



??Y|f7E hold these truths to be self-evi- 
** dent, that all men are created 
equal, that they are endowed by their 
Creator with certain inalienable Rights, 
that among these are Life, Liberty and 
the Pursuit of Happiness. That to secure 
these rights. Governments are instituted 
among Men, deriving their just powers 
from the consent of the governed . . ." 

These words, once so familiar to 
Americans, are taken from the Declara- 
tion of Independence. On this July 4th 
we mark the 185th birthday of this 
document. Perhaps not many citizens 
have read the Declaration in recent years. 

None the less, this old document is the 
key to U. S. liberty. Perhaps we ought 
to take time out this July 4th to re-read 
— or read for the first time the entire text 
of the Declaration of Independence. At 
the same time let us refresh our mem- 
ories about the man who wrote it — 
Thomas Jefferson. He was one of the 
most sophisticated men of his time but 
let every reader of The Carpenter make 
note that he sat at a portable desk he 
had carried from Virginia to Pennsyl- 
vania to write this political masterpiece 
— a desk he had designed and constructed 
himself. Jefferson knew, understood, de- 
fined and defended for all time the rights 
of those who work with their hands as 
well as their brains. 

He was Minister to France. Secretary 
of State and President of the United 
States but when he wrote his epitaph he 
selected three achievements for which he 
wanted to be remembered by his fellow 
men. This marks the measure of the man 
he was — author of the Virginia Statute 
on Religious Freedom, author of the 
Declaration of Independence and founder 
of the University of Virginia. 



VOLUME LXXXI 



NO. 7 



James A. Eldridge, Editor 
JULY. 1961 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

3 America Lets Its Guard Down by R. E. Livingston 
9 AGC and Building Trades Sign Pact 
19 Religious Leaders Underscore Labor's Stand on Migrant 
Labor by Harry Conn 

DEPARTMENTS 

2 Washington Roundup 

10 Canadian Section 

12 Editorials 

15 Budget Battle 

16 Index to Advertisers 

17 Progress Report 

18 Official Information 
21 In Memoriam 

23 Random Reading 

24 Outdoor Meanderings 

25 Short-Cuts 

26 What's New 

27 Local Union News 

32 In Conclusion by M. A. Hutcheson 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579-P should he senl lo THE 
CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building. 222 E. Michigan Street. Indianapolis 4. Indiana. 

Published monthly at SIO Rhode Island Ave.. N. E.. Washington IS. D. C, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at' Washington. 
D. C Subscription price: United Stales and Canada $2.00 per year, single copies 20r in advance. 







ASHINGTON ROUNDUP 



MARITIME ISSUE AND A STRANGE COINCIDENCE The problem of the decline of the 
American Merchant Marine disturbs a great many people. This decline means the 
loss of jobs in the ship construction, repair and cargo handling industries. The 
Carpenters share the apprehension held by many over the shocking state of affairs 
pertaining to the merchant marine. In order to inform our members on this matter 
a special article was planned some time ago and it was scheduled for this issue. 
This month will see a peak load of travel and we will see pointed up the fact 
that we are in a sad situation. 

Much of the damage to American workers in the shipping and shipbuilding 
industries comes from Americans — Americans who are using foreign flags. We call 
these "runaway" ships. The users, that is the American owners who use foreign 
flags — Panama, Liberia, Greek, etc. — call them "flags of convenience." 

It is a coincidence that just as this article is scheduled and while the 
July issue was being assembled, the National Maritime Union was on strike against 
these foreign flags. The strike helps to reenforce the information and conclu- 
sions found in the article "America Lets Its Guard Down" on page 3. This 
article by General Secretary R. E. Livingston is both informative and important. 
We think every member of Congress ought to make it required reading. 

HOUSING HOPE As this issue of The Carpenter was being prepared for press the 
United States Senate had just passed an omnibus housing bill. The vote for the 
bill 64 to 29 was decisive, but it did not come without plenty of political 
static. After the Senate passed the bill, the measure went to the House of 
Representatives where we may expect to see a lusty volume of opposition. 

We think we will have a housing bill before the session ends and a pretty 
good one. In this measure as passed by the Senate was an element of particular 
interest to the skilled worker groups. This provision would make it possible 
for so-called middle income people ($4,000 to $6,000, roughly speaking) to obtain 
loans for housing. These people have been caught in the squeeze. They earn too 
much to benefit from public housing projects and yet they find it difficult and 
in most cases impossible to enjoy really first class housing in the commercial 
market. 

As Carpenters we are glad to see a good housing bill because it will be a 
real stimulus to employment. We are also glad to see hope for housing for the 
middle income people which is where most of our members will be found. 

VACATION SAFETY NOTE This month and next will mark the peak periods for the 
year for vacations. The working people of America, organized and unorganized 
can thank the trade unions for their increasingly generous vacations. Unions 
fight for vacations and win. And the rest of the country is heavily influenced 
by the action of union-employing firms. 

And as vacations become more generous we note more and more travel. This 
means a better time for all, but it also increases summer hazards. For as work- 
ing families travel about, going to national parks, going to the mountains or the 
seashore, they inevitably incur certain risks. Most of all are the risks incident 
to motor travel. The National Safety Council has been cooperating with labor 
unions and other groups in an endeavor to reduce the appalling toll of accidents. 
The Safety Council may list a number of hazards in summer, but the motor travel 
danger is one which is of especial importance. 

While this is no place to go into details on summer safety, we cannot 
refrain from enjoining our members who may be travelling to use the utmost care 
everywhere. If every motorist would use more care on the highway, we would see 
a dramatic reduction in the loss of life. More care everywhere would result in 
real lifesaving. Among the many ways to help in this cause is that of refraining 
from too much speed. Let's see a use of the slogan in every day application of 
"Slow Down and Live." If we all slow down a bit, a lot more of us will be alive 
to enjoy next year's vacation. 

2 THE CARPENTER 



awadto 



LETS ITS GUARD DOWN 




By R. E. LIVINGSTON, General Secretary 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America 



AT the end of every war, the United 
States has allowed its Merchant 
Marine to deteriorate. For example, 
after World War I our Merchant 
Marine almost disappeared. When 
World War II broke out, it was neces- 
sary for us to engage in a crash pro- 
gram of shipbuilding. American 
shipyards and the shipbuilders suc- 
ceeded, under the most difficult cir- 
cumstances, in building merchant ships 
at a rate never before equalled. At 
the end of World War II. our Mer- 
chant fleet was larger than all other 
Merchant fleets combined and was. in 
fact, the biggest and most efficient 
Merchant fleet in the history of the 
world. Commencing in 1946 our gov- 
ernment again allowed our Merchant 
fleet to deteriorate, so that at the time 
of the Korean War we lacked suffi- 
cient ships and seamen to move the 
men and material required by that 
war. By taking ships out of the re- 
serve fleet, and by a most vigorous 
recruitment of seamen by the mari- 
time unions, we were able, but be- 
latedly, to meet that crisis. 

Great Rush for Suez 

After the Korea War, the American 
Merchant fleet rapidly declined in 
quantity and quality. When the Suez 
crisis occurred in 1956. we found our- 
selves again short of men and ships. 
The government thereupon called upon 
American shipping companies to en- 
gage in a crash building of tankers. 
The unions recruited additional sea- 
men. The sad fact is that now most 
of the supertankers built to meet the 
Suez emergency are idle, and the 

JULY, 1961 



additional seamen recruited are un- 
employed. 

According to the American Bureau 
of Shipping, of our total dry cargo 
exports in 1946, American-flag ships 
carried 60.9 per cent; in October, 
1960, American-flag ships carried 
18.3. Of our total exports by tanker 
in 1946, American-flag ships carried 
39.9 per cent; in October, 1960, 
American-flag ships carried IS. 3 per 
cent. Of our dry cargo imports, in 
1946 American-flag ships carried 56.3 
per cent; in October, 1960, American- 
flag ships carried 14.3 per cent. Of 
our tanker imports in 1946, American- 
flag ships carried 75.8 per cent; in 
October, 1960, American-flag ships 
carried 3.3 per cent. 




R. E. LIVINGSTON 
. . . warns of America's declining mari- 
time power in a world of rapid changes. 



Our economy depends to a large 
extent upon oil, as does our national 
defense. Because of the exhaustion 
of American oil reserves, we are be- 
coming more and more dependent 
each year on foreign reserves. A sub- 
stantial percentage of the oil we use 
is now imported. And the even more 
alarming fact is that only about 3 per 
cent of the oil we import is carried 
on American-flag ships, with Ameri- 
can crews owing allegiance to this 
country. 

O// Industry Is Not Alone 

The oil industry is not, of course, 
the only industry affected by the run- 
away-flag gimmick. More than one- 
third of the iron ore we use in the 
United States is now imported, and 
practically all of it is carried on 
foreign-flag ships. Almost all of our 
aluminum is derived from imported 
bauxite, and almost every pound of it 
is carried on foreign-flag ships. For 
these indispensable sinews of war, oil, 
iron and aluminum, we are now al- 
most completely dependent upon for- 
eign-flag ships, and on foreign crews 
recruited in all parts of the globe, all 
without loyalty or allegiance to this 
country, and many with ideologies 
which are in basic conflict with the 
American way of life and American 
institutions. Indeed, many of the 
runaway-flag ships are manned by 
crews recruited in Cuba, and other 
Latin American countries, and they 
show a marked and alarming sym- 
pathy with international Communism. 

The depression in the American 
Maritime industry is steadily growing 
worse. Eighty (80) per cent of the 
documented American seamen are 
unemployed. Inevitably, the indus- 



tries dependent upon the Maritime 
industry are also depressed. For ex- 
ample, the United States has more 
and better shipbuilding facilities than 
all of the other countries in the world 
combined. But most of our shipyards 
are shut down and most of the 
highly skilled craftsmen in the indus- 
try have been obliged to find employ- 
ment elsewhere. At present, in spite 
of all of the government subsidies for 
ship construction, less than one mil- 
lion gross tons of shipping are being 
built in all American shipyards. 
French yards are building almost half 
as much, West Germany is building 
70 per cent as much, and Japan is 
building substantially more. Includ- 
ing ship construction for the Navy, 
only about 200,000 men are employed 
in American shipyards, as compared 
to 354,000 in 1946 and 377,000 in 
1941. 

What is the "runaway flag" gim- 
mick? All this was recently explained 
in detail by Edwin N. Altaian, the 
Legislative Director of the Maritime 



Trades Department, AFL-CIO, in 
testimony before the House Ways and 
Means Committee in Washington. He 
said, "I want to call to your attention 
what the Maritime Trades Depart- 
ment regards as the most flagrant and 
outrageous tax haven device used by 
American citizens. I refer to the op- 
eration of ships owned entirely by 
American citizens under foreign flags. 
We call these ships "runaway-flag" 
ships. In international affairs they are 
referred to as "flags of convenience". 
The users of the gimmick refer to 
them as "flags of necessity". Here is 
how the gimmick works: If an Ameri- 
can oil company operates a tanker 
under the American flag, the opera- 
tion is of course governed by Ameri- 
can tax laws, American labor laws, 
American safety standards, and other 
government regulations. 

It's a Simple Thing to Do 

But under existing law, all the oil 
company has to do to escape all of 
these laws, and to completely escape 




Two chapters in America's maritime history are shown in the above photographs. 
The background photo shows the launching of a wartime ship when America was 
in desperate need of tonnage to carry men and munitions to the battlefronts of 
Europe and the Far East. Inset photo shows Liberty ships in "reserve" status. 



regulation by the American govern- 
ment, is to organize a corporation in 
Liberia or Panama, transfer the naked 
legal title to the ship to its foreign 
corporation, and thereafter operate the 
ship under the foreign flag. The ship 
never leaves the trade in which it was 
engaged under the American flag. The 
ship never goes to Panama or Liberia. 
It does not employ Liberians or Pana- 
manians. It continues to carry oil 
from its foreign origin to an Ameri- 
can port. It continues to enjoy all the 
blessings of doing business with 
America, but it completely escapes 
the impact of American law, and it 
is thereby able to increase its profits 
many fold. In further discussion of 
this matter for the sake of simplicity, 
I shall refer only to Liberia, because 
the great proportion of the runaway- 
flag ships sail under the Liberian flag. 

Tax Dodge Is Obvious 

"So long as the tanker is operated 
under the Liberian flag, and until the 
profits of the Liberian operation are 
transferred by dividend or otherwise 
to the American parent corporation, 
the tanker owners never pay any in- 
come tax on the ship's operation. This 
amounts to an unlimited tax defer- 
ment. Indeed, in a practical sense, it 
amounts to complete tax avoidance. 

"It must be emphasized that the 
Liberian corporation does not pay any 
income tax to Liberia. Now let me 
emphasize that this operation does not 
involve the investment of a dollar by 
the American company in Liberia. 
This is altogether unlike the case in 
which an American corporation builds 
a factory in a foreign country, em- 
ploys the citizens of that country, pays 
taxes to the country, and actually par- 
ticipates in the economy of the foreign 

Facing Page Photos 

Construction and repair of ships should 
be big business in the U.S., but unfortun- 
ately much of this business is slipping 
away. The scenes opposite are scenes 
from American yards employing a variety 
of skills. 

Top left, a big "prop" gets an overhaul. 

Top right, reinforcement is made on a 
vessel in for an overhaul and refitting. 

Center, ship construction makes a striking 
industrial pattern. Unfortunately, the 
U.S. is way down the list in shipbuilding 
volume. 

Lower left, the cluttered deck means that 
a ship is getting major attention from an 
army of skilled shipworkers. 

Lower right, a drafting room in a large 
American ship construction and repair 
yard. Shipwork takes an extraordinary 
amount of planning and drafting work. 



THE CARPENTER 




JULY, 1961 



I . ;■ V:: :': ! : : '•!' ~±* 




Past, present and future power on the 
high seas are shown in these photos. 
The days of sail are recalled in the old 
U.S.S. CONSTITUTION, above. Top 
right is the N.S. SAVANNAH, nuclear 
powered vessel built for the atomic age. 
At lower right is the UNITED STATES, 
pride of today's American passenger fleet. 







country. In the case of the runaway- 
flag ship, let me repeat that the ship 
never goes to Liberia, and in all prob- 
ability no Liberian will ever see it." 

What is the direct effect of all this 
upon the American Merchant Marine? 

We're Running In 4th Place 

At the end of World War II the 
American merchant marine was the 
largest in history, and larger than all 
other merchant fleets combined. To- 
day, we rank fourth as a maritime 
power, after Great Britain, Norway 
and Liberia, and we are rapidly losing 
ground. On April 1, 1961, there were 
905 privately-owned vessels of 1,000 
gross tons and over in the active 
ocean-going U. S. merchant fleet. As 
of June 30, 1960, there were more 
than 2,000 ships in the merchant ma- 
rine of the United Kingdom, 1,346 
ships under Norwegian flag, 946 un- 
der the Liberian flag, and 520 ships 
under the flag of Panama. As of 
December 31, 1960, of the Liberian 
fleet of more than 900 ships, 135 
were wholly-owned by United States 
companies and their affiliates. While 
American companies were operating 
900 ships under the American flag, 
as of December 31, 1960, wholly- 
owned American companies were op- 
erating 461 ships under foreign flag. 



As compared with our 905 privately- 
owned ships, the USSR has a mer- 
chant marine consisting of 841 ships. 
Gulf Oil Corporation operates 16 
tankers under the Liberian flag. D. K. 
Ludwig operates 26 tankers under the 
Liberian flag. Socony-Mobile Oil 
Company, Inc. and Standard Oil Corn- 



Japan Speaks 

"As of the end of March, J 960, 
Japan had 310 shipyards for steel 
vessels and 1,370 for wooden vessels 
. . . there are 13 shipyards capable of 
building oil tankers of more than 33,- 
000 deadweight tons. Many of them 
can construct ships of over 60,000 
DW tons. In 1949, the construction 
of a 7,000 gross top tramper took one 
million man-hours, but by 1954, the 
amount of time required dropped to 
690,000 man-hours and by 1959, 
further to 450,000 man-hours . . . 
The shipbuilding industry is now con- 
cerned with such projects as the de- 
velopment of atom-powered ships, liq- 
uid petroleum gas transports and 
super-speed ships . . ." 

—from "JAPAN REPORT," 
a monthly information bulle- 
tin published by the Em- 
bassy of Japan. 



pany of New Jersey jointly operate 
13 tankers under the Panamanian 
flag. In addition, Socony operates 8 
tankers under the Panamanian flag 
and one under the Liberian. Stand- 
ard Oil of California operates 9 tank- 
ers under the Liberian flag and 15 
tankers under the Panamanian flag. 
In addition to the joint operation with 
Socony, Standard Oil of New Jersey 
operates 31 tankers under the Pana- 
manian flag. Texaco operates 22 
tankers under the Panamanian flag. 

United Fruit On the List 

United Fruit operates 15 dry cargo 
ships under the Honduran flag. Alcoa 
operates 8 ore carriers under the 
Panamanian flag, 1 under the Li- 
berian. Mr. Ludwig operates 15 ore 
carriers under the Liberian flag. 

The continued existence of this 
vicious situation is highly dangerous. 
It is destroying the shipping industry 
of the United States, without con- 
tributing substantially to the economy 
of the tax haven countries. It is seri- 
ously weakening our national defense, 
by making us dependent on foreign 
crews for the most strategic war ma- 
terials, by reducing the size and qual- 
ity of our Merchant Marine, by 
destroying the incentive of American 
business to invest in American-flag 



THE CARPENTER 



shipping operations. It is impeding 
the development of improved tech- 
nologies in the shipping and ship- 
building industries. It is forcing into 
other industries highly skilled seamen, 
shipbuilders, and other crafts which 
are indispensable to our existence as 
a first-rate maritime power. In spite 
of the lower costs of the runaway- 
flag fleets, their operation has not 
resulted in any saving to American 
consumers, and indeed enables Ameri- 
can international oil and ore com- 
panies to exercise monopolistic control 
over prices. The only beneficiaries of 
the runaway-flag operations are the 
already bloated international cartels 
in oil and ore. To satisfy their greed, 
the Government, the American con- 
sumer, the American tax payer, and 
the American ship operator are being 
victimized. 

Kennedy Turned On the Light 

President Kennedy in his tax 
message of April 20, 1961 said: 

"Profits earned abroad by Ameri- 
can firms operating through foreign 



(Editor's Note: We gratefully ac- 
knowledge the assistance Ray Mur- 
doch of the Seafarers' Welfare Plan 
gave Brother Livingston in the prep- 
aration of this article.) 

subsidiaries are, under present tax 
laws, subject to U.S. tax only when 
they are returned to the parent 
company in the form of dividends. 
In some cases, this tax deferral has 
made possible indefinite postpone- 
ment of the U.S. tax; and, in those 
countries where income taxes are 
lower than in the United States, 
the ability to defer the payment of 
U.S. tax by retaining income in the 
subsidiary companies provides a tax 
advantage for companies operating 
through overseas subsidiaries that is 
not available to companies operat- 
ing solely in the United States." 

/f's Costing U. S. Money 

The recommendations the President 
then made for "plugging" these tax 
loopholes are the first effective pro- 
posals made to eliminate this great 
economic evil which has not only cost 



the U.S. tax dollars but it has con- 
tributed greatly to the weakening of 
our prestige as a world power. Con- 
gress should promptly enact this 
needed legislation. 



Strike Note 

As this issue of THE CAR- 
PENTER was going to press the 
National Maritime Union and 
the Seafarers Union were on 
strike in American ports. One 
of the key points at issue be- 
tween the unions and the ship 
owners is the question of jur- 
isdiction over the crews on 
American-owned ships registered 
under foreign flags. This serves 
to emphasize the vital impor- 
tance of this timely article. 



Foreign ships and foreign flags are playing havoc with Ameri- 
can maritime power. Below are shown ships from maritime 
nations which are garnering a heavy share of both ship con- 
struction and ocean-going shipping. Top left is a dutch 
vessel fitted for cargo and passenger service. Lower left is a 
Swedish ore carrier. Top right, is the Queen Mary, one of 
the great prides of the British merchant navy. At lower 



right is a vessel in late stages of construction in a Japanese 
shipyard. The growth of the Japanese shipping and ship con- 
struction industries have been one of the spectacular develop- 
ments of the post-war era. The inset life preserver is from a 
cruise ship which flies the Liberian flag. The name "Monrovia" 
will be found on many ships with "flags of convenience." 
Greek and Panamanian registries are extensively used. 




JULY, 1961 



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AGC and Building Trades Sign Pact 

General President Hutcheson Joins in Industry-Wide Agreement 




The representatives of the international trade unions and the 
representatives of the Associated General Contractors of 
America, Inc. are shown meeting in Washington, D. C. to 
develop an effective work stoppage plan. Seated, left to right, 
Harold Thirion, international representative of the Teamsters; 
J. H. Lyons, Sr., president of the Iron Workers; AGC Execu- 
tive Director James D. Marshall; AGC Labor Committee 
Chairman Charles Keller, Jr.; Maurice A. Hutcheson, presi- 
dent of the Carpenters; Peter Fosco, secretary-treasurer of 
the Laborers; E. J. Leonard, president of the Plasterers; Joseph 
J. Delaney, president of the Operating Engineers, and John J. 
Murphy, president of the Bricklayers. Standing, left to right. 



E. T. Kelly, AGC national staff; O. William Blair, vice presi- 
dent of the Carpenters; AGC Past President Frank J. Rooney; 
AGC Assistant Executive Director William E. Dunn; W. E. 
Naumann, AGC Labor Committee member; Hunter Wharton, 
secretary-treasurer of the Operating Engineers; Prof. John T. 
Dunlop of Harvard; John J. Hauck, secretary-treasurer of the 
Plasterers; J. H. Lyons, Jr., vice president of the Iron Workers; 
Vincent F. Morreale, general counsel of the Laborers; AGC 
Past President Lester C. Rogers; James D. McClary, Donald 
K. Grant and N. B. O'Connell, all members of the AGC 
Labor Committee. The new pact will help speed public and 
private construction work throughout the country. 



Our General President. M. A. 
Hutcheson, and the general presidents 
of several of the other basic trade 
unions have been concerned for some 
time with the extent of work stop- 
pages in the building and construction 
industry. Over the past several years 
these men have met with the officers 
of the Associated General Contractors 
of America, Inc. to discuss ways to 
resolve disputes without resort to 
strike, lockout or litigation, in the 
interests of their members, the in- 
dustry and the public. 

These efforts recently bore fruit in 
an agreement that was signed between 
the seven international unions and the 
Associated General Contractors of 
America. 

This agreement established volun- 
tary machinery for the settlement of 
all disputes between these parties 
which may arise on a construction site 



and in a locality, which are not other- 
wise governed by procedures estab- 
lished by collective bargaining. The 
agreement also establishes a Labor- 
Management Appeals Board for Con- 
struction, to be known as the Joint 
Appeals Board, which shall be avail- 
able to decide any disputed issues 
between parties which voluntarily 
agree to use this machinery. 

In addition to the Brotherhood's 
General President, the following inter- 
national presidents signed the agree- 
ment — John .1. Murphy. Bricklayers, 
Masons and Plasterers International 
Union; Joseph J. Delaney, Interna- 
tional Union of Operating Engineers; 
Peter Fosco. International Hod Car- 
riers. Building and Common Laborers 
Union; J. H. Lyons, International 
Association of Bridge, Structural and 
Ornamental Iron Workers; Edward J. 



Leonard, Operative Plasterers and 
Cement Masons International Asso- 
ciation; Harold Thirion (signed for 
James R. Hoffa), International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters. Chauf- 
feurs. Warehousemen and Helpers 
of America. 

Signing for the Associated General 
Contractors were Charles Keller. Jr., 
Keller Construction Corp.: James D. 
McClary, Morrison-Knudsen Co.; W. 
E. Naumann, M. M. Sundt Construc- 
tion Co.: N. B. O'Connell. Turner 
Construction Co.: Frank J. Rooney. 
Frank J. Rooney Co.: Donald K. 
Grant. Guy F. Atkinson Co.; and 
Lester C. Rogers. Bates & Rogers 
Construction Corp. They will serve 
on the Joint Appeals Board. Professor 
John T. Dunlop of Harvard Univer- 
sity will serve as the non-voting chair- 
man of the Joint Appeals Board. 



JULY, 1961 




'"frv 



cMlciil 




mmmmm mmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmm 

S E CT I ON 



THE PRESIDENTIAL VISIT 



Recognition of Place in World Affairs Accorded Canada 



THE timely visit of U. S. President 
John F. Kennedy awakened in Ca- 
nadians a new interest, a new concern, 
for their place in world affairs. This 
is all to the good. 

The fact that the President saw fit 
to make Canada his first visiting point 
since his election was a compliment 
in itself. It acknowledged the role 
that Canada has played, and could still 
play, as a middle power between the 
big powers and the many small ones. 

Canadians took the Kennedys to 
their hearts. Certainly the First Lady 
commanded as much attention at first 
as the President himself. Mrs. Ken- 
nedy would attract a good eye any- 
where and Ottawa, with its French- 
Canadian background, has a fair share 
of good eyes. 

The President's visit was more than 
a routine goodwill trip. Or to put it 
in another way he combined business 
with pleasure. 

Canada, for example, has not seen 
fit to join the Organization of Ameri- 
can States. A seat has been kept open 
for it and President Kennedy invited 
Prime Minister Diefenbaker to fill it. 
Could the present touchy situation be- 
tween the U. S. and some countries in 
Latin America be relieved with the 
help of Canadians at the council table? 

Perhaps the President thought so. 
"Your skills, your resources, your 
judicious perception at the council 
table — even when it differs from our 
own view — are all needed throughout 
the Inter-American community." 

Parliament listened earnestly and 
politely. But what will happen to this 
OAS invitation? Likely nothing. The 
Conservative press, which most closely 
reflects government policy, has been 
sending up alarm rockets. 



"A magic wand," said the Toronto 
Telegraph, "in the hands of an able 
and attractive American President 
would be a wonderful device in inter- 
national affairs. But such, alas, is an 
illusion. . . . There is little anti- Ameri- 
canism in Canada, but there are areas 
of friction and frustration . . ." and 
so on and so on. 

The Financial Post was more 
pointed. It said Canada should stay 
out of the Organization of American 
States. "There is no contribution to 
hemispheric peace and welfare that 
we can possibly make as a member 
of OAS that we can't make as a non- 
member. And in some cases non- 
membership can be a positive advant- 
age. It is quite understandable that 




JACQUELINE KENNEDY 

... the President's wife charmed Cana- 
dians during official visit from the I . S. 



President Kennedy wants more votes 
for his side in the OAS. He wants us 
to come in so that we will vote with 
him the way the other satellites like 
Byelorussia or Bulgaria vote with the 
Soviet Union in the UN." 

This is very blunt speaking and 
Canadians are not always blunt 
speakers. The present mood of Cana- 
da, however, is not too badly reflected 
in these comments. The Cuban de- 
bacle upset people in this country. 
Kennedy's bold, even rash, words 
afterwards got a poor reception. 

There are deeper reasons for the 
coolness of the Conservative press, but 
the President's major address in the 
House of Commons was generally very 
well received. 

It should be noted that the Cana- 
dian Labour Congress has announced 
its support for the entry of Canada to 
the OAS. Canadian trade unionists 
are vitally interested in the ICFTU 
activities in Latin America — in the 
Caribbean area in particular — and 
would like to see our government 
make a bigger contribution. 

Canadian trade unionists would al- 
so support President Kennedy's appeal 
for larger Canadian commitments in 
economic and technical assistance to 
the underdeveloped nations of the 
world. He asked for aid to the extent 
of one percent of Canada's gross na- 
tional product — about $350 million a 
year. This is five or six times what 
Canada is contributing now. Prime 
Minister Diefenbaker has already 
brushed this suggestion off. The trade 
union movement would support it. 

The President has more important 
things to do then keep on prodding 
Canada. He has a great deal of un- 
finished business in and around his 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



own country. But the United States 
would do well to keep a good weather- 
eye cocked to the north for some time 
to come. This broad land has stra- 
tegically-situated resources that U. S. 
industry cannot very well do without. 



But the size of the U. S. industrial 
foot across the border is bothering a 
lot of people here, and the frustration 
of not knowing what to do about it 
doesn't make for even tempers — or 
objective decisions. 



CANADIAN NOTES 



A major strike in Toronto's house 
construction industry took place late 
in May. The building trades unions 
charged the contractors with whole- 
sale violations of collective agree- 
ments. Most of the workers are im- 
migrants, recently organized into the 
building trades after public exposure 
of gross exploitation and complete 
disregard of safety precautions by 
employers. 

* * * 

The Ontario government has an- 
nounced a $100,000,000 overhaul of 
the province's secondary school sys- 
tem. 

The Frost government had come 
under severe criticism from the On- 
tario Federation of Labor for its 
failure to provide adequate technical 
school educational facilities. The 
federal government's offer to pay 
75% of the cost of building new 
trade and technical training projects 
was ignored for two years. 

The new plans for education should, 
it is estimated, provide about 20.000 
jobs in the construction and allied 
fields. This is good news to the 20 to 
30 % of building trades workers who 
have been jobless this past winter. 

* * * 

The federal government is backing 
a substantial shipbuilding program on 
the Great Lakes, expected to provide 
up to 10,000 jobs in the shipyards. 
The plan includes payment of 40% of 
the cost of Canadian ships built in 
Canadian yards for two years, then 
35%; payment of half the cost of 
replacing wooden ships with steel 
which would help Canada's outdated 
fishing fleets. Foreign ships would be 
barred from carrying cargoes between 
Canadian ports on the Great Lakes. 

Four federal by-elections held May 
29th returned three Conservative 
government supporters and one 
Liberal. But the Liberals took the key 
seat of Leeds in Ontario. Leeds had 
voted Conservative in every election 
but two since Confederation in 1867. 
The Liberals also got more total votes 
than the Conservatives in the four 
seats. The government has now lost 



three straight by-elections in Ontario 
— two to the Liberals, one to the New 
Party. 

Toronto's huge Royal York Hotel 
was out of bounds starting in mid- 
May. The Hotel and Restaurant 
Union called a strike against sub- 
standard wages, lowest among the 
major hotels in the area, and manage- 
ment's determination to breach key 
contract provisions. Dozens of union 
functions were shifted to other hotels 
but Ontario's Labour Minister Daley 
didn't hesitate to cross picket line to 
attend a dinner. Several Conservative 
cabinet ministers lived in the hotel 
during the strike, but visiting CCF 
Premier Tommy Douglas of Saskat- 



chewan walked out. carrying his own 
bag, and found accommodation else- 
where. The hotel is owned by the 
billion-dollar Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way. 

In the two years from April 1959 
to April 1961, 26,000 workers entered 
the labor force in British Columbia 
but only 2,000 new jobs were created. 
This caused a 24,000 increase in un- 
employment. This is the pattern 
across Canada. Economists say that 
even with the predicted recovery this 
summer and fall, unemployment is 
unlikely to fall much below 500.000 
— or about 8% of the working force. 
* * * 

A cave-in at the subway construc- 
tion project in Toronto claimed the 
lives of two men, an engineer and a 
carpentry foreman. Angus Smith, 
secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters 
District Council, charged that large 
jacks used to support the forms had 
not been properly breached and 
should not have been approved. He 
demanded that further safety precau- 
tions be taken. This is the fifth acci- 
dent in three years in the Toronto 
area involving construction jacks. 



Correction, Please, on Labor Law 



An item from Ottawa in our April 
issue stated that "An Act of the 
federal government makes it com- 
pulsory for unions to file detailed 
reports etc. etc." 

The story should have read "An Act 
presented to the House of Commons 
by the federal government would 
make it compulsory etc. etc." 

Entitled the "Corporations and 
Labor Statistics Act" it would also 
affect U.S. -controlled corporations 
and subsidiaries in Canada. 

The Act has had first reading in the 
House. It must go through second 
reading, committee stage and third 
reading before becoming law. 

The Canadian Labour Congress has 
asked to be given an opportunity to 
present its criticism of the bill. It is 
understood that a similar request has 
been made by corporations concerned. 

There is growing evidence that the 
government — for this session of 
Parliament at least — may drop this 
hill forcing international labor un- 
ions to disclose financial and other 
material. 

The legislation was forecast last 
November 17 when the new session 
convened and has been lying dormant 
on the Commons order paper since 



February 17 with the briefest of ex- 
planations of its purposes from lustice 
Minister Fulton. 

But Mr. Fulton now has dropped 
a hint that the whole thing may be 
dropped. This is what he had to say 
to a query whether he intended to 
proceed with this bill C-70. 

"That matter . . . will have to de- 
pend upon the progress made in deal- 
ing with the legislative program of 
the session." He has rejected further 
efforts to find out what the plans are. 

Bill C-70 was aimed both at corpo- 
rations and international unions and 
it was concocted to meet the strong 
anti-union bias among the rank-and- 
file of Progressive Conservative mem- 
bers of Parliament. 

Many crowed openly when they saw- 
its inclusion in the government legis- 
lation program. Mr. Fulton has ad- 
mitted, however, that he has received 
some requests to ditch the legislation. 

His explanation of the whole bill 
on first reading was brief. It was "to 
compel the disclosure of certain im- 
portant essentials as to the details of 
their operations by corporations and 
trade unions carrying on activities in 
Canada (and) which are controlled 
from outside Canada." 



JULY, 1961 



11 



3EBITOMA1L 




Perry Como Gives the Word 

TV's popular singing star. Perry Como, has a theme 
song "We Get Letters." He uses this song as he fills 
the many song requests his fans send in by mail. This 
month we are borrowing Perry's delightful ditty for 
some editorial thoughts. 

It's time for readers of The Carpenter to sing 
"It's Time to Write Letters." Yes, now is the 
time for all of us in organized labor to write three 
letters. The first one is to our Congressman and 
the other two should be sent to our two U. S. 
Senators. During the coming weeks many pieces 
of legislation vital to America's working people 
will come to a vote in either the House or the 
Senate in Washington. Many phases of President 
Kennedy's progressive welfare program will face 
the vital tests between now and mid August. Now 
is the time to speak up or forever keep your gripes 
to yourself. 
Among these bills are "Health Benefits for the Aged 
Through Social Security." This is also called President 
Kennedy's Medical Care for the Aged Bill. This much- 
needed law bill should have the active, vocal support 
of every American who works for a living. Don't let 
the American Medical Association's phony cry of 
'socialism' mislead you. The doctors' 'company union' 
is talking through its stethiscope. Then there are the 
education bills that would build the needed classrooms 
throughout America; support the Urban Renewal Pro- 
gram — let's rid the U. S. of its shocking slums. These 
are just three of the many items that Congress is now 
considering that affect YOU. 

The Department of Legislation of the AFL-CIO 
has prepared an excellent pamphlet to help union 
members who want to write their Congressmen. 
Just drop a postal card to Brother Andrew Bie- 
miller, AFL-CIO, 815 Sixteenth St.. N.W., Wash- 
ington. He will send you a free copy of "When 
You Write Your Congressman." 



A Thought for the Fourth of July 

There is a particular word that Americans are using 
more frequently these days. It is the word excellence. 
Why? Well, it is really quite simple. A large number 
of thinking citizens are beginning to realize that 
America dare not be second best during the dangerous 
years that are ahead. As we come to know more and 



more about the nature of the Red challenge it is also 
becoming more obvious that we cannot be second best 
in national defense, education or standard of living. 

All three of these are indirectly linked to the 
Soviet threat. Russia and Red China will remain 
for many years to come a military danger to the 
Free World. Our weapons, our strategy and our 
manpower must reflect the excellence that we know 
a democratic society can achieve. 
Our schools must provide the excellence in intellect- 
ual, and moral training. Freedom will be preserved for 
coming generations if today's students have 'tough' 
brains and strong souls. Our standard of living — the 
wages we pay — the houses we live in — the cities we 
build — all must give hope to the underdeveloped areas 
of the world that a decent standard of living can be 
created for all mankind by a free society. 

Excellence is today's watchword for liberty. 



Labor-Management Progress 

On Page 9 of this issue of The Carpenter is a 
remarkable story. We are especially proud of this 
report because of the part our General President, M. A. 
Hutcheson, played in the development of this great 
step forward in U. S. labor-management relations. 

Under this new program an agreement has been 
signed between seven international unions and the 
Associated General Contractors of America, Inc. 
As the story points out, this agreement creates 
machinery for the settlement of any labor disputes 
(other than jurisdictional) without strike or lock 
out. 
Thus, the building trades and a leading trade asso- 
ciation are showing the way toward a new day in 
industrial relations. It is to be noted that seven great 
international unions, including our own Brotherhood, 
were able to come together and present a united front. 
In turn, these unions were able through many weeks of 
negotiation to maintain with the contractors an atmos- 
phere of cordiality. 

This is all to the good. All America will profit 

from this agreement. Much-needed construction 

can go forward to help build a more prosperous 

and secure America. 

General President Hutcheson and all the men who 

developed this agreement deserve the thanks of their 

co-workers and their countrymen. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



^ 



A Tree Doth Grow 

For there is hope of a tree, 

If it be cut down, that it will sprout 

again, 
And that the tender branch thereof 

will not cease. 

Through the root thereof wax old in 

the earth, 
And the stock thereof die in the 

ground; 
Yet through the scent of water it 

will bud, 
And put forth boughs like a plant. 

JOB 14=7 




Give Young Americans This Chance 

Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg has laid before 
the Congress a three-pronged program to help end 
unemployment among the nation's young people. 
According to the Secretary unemployment among this 
particular group is "running at a rate more than twice 
the national average". 

The plan calls for an on-the-job training program 
supplemented with classroom instructions; a public 
service, public-work employment and training pro- 
gram operated in conjunction with state and local 
governments, to develop trained personnel for such 
institutions as schools and hospitals; and a youth 
conservation corps similar to the Civilian Conserva- 
tion Corps of the New Deal days. 
This program should have a top priority in Con- 
gressional discussion, debate and action. Twenty six 
million young people will enter the labor force in the 
next 10 years. They must be trained. They must have 
a sense of participation and accomplishment. There is 
in America today an appalling waste of the talent, 
idealism and incentive of young people. This must 

cease. 

The Administration's program has been endorsed 
unanimously by the President's Labor-Management 
Advisory Committee. It is a part of a wider pro- 
gram of re-training and relocating adults made job- 
less by the impact of automation and inevitable 
industrial changes. 

Let us cross this new frontier at once. 



It's a Free Trip 

A Guest Editorial 

(Editor's Note: The following editorial is taken from 
the Religion and Labor newsletter Walking Together. 
We are indebted to the Rev. Clair M. Cook, Editor, 
Columbus, O. for these apt words.) 

Want a trip to Rome? . . . Acapulco? . . . Jamaica? 
. . . Paris? . . . 

One way to get it is to be an air conditioner dealer 
and make your sales quota. If you are a General Elec- 
tric man, you may be one of the 750 central air con- 
ditioning dealers to spend a week next November at 
the Castellana Hilton in Madrid. If you are with Gibson 
Refrigerator Sales Corporation, you'll probably be 
among the 7,000 dealers flying to Jamaica and Panama 
for sales meetings this fall. Oh, yes — bring your wife, 
too. It's all at company expense. 

Or perhaps you might get to go to the Caribbean 
on a floating sales meeting junket. A Washington 
travel agency which booked passage for 7,000 busi- 
ness guests last year is now offering "a three-ship 
flotilla, with the host firm's name emblazoned on 
banners on the sides of each ship." Company officials 
will get about from one ship to another by heli- 
copter, and business sessions aboard the flagship 
will be piped to the others by closed-circuit TV. 
Swimming, lavish buffets, floor shows, and first-run 
movies will be attractions to offset the drudgery of 
sales meetings. 

These are among the items reported in a recent 
Wall Street Journal article. Where dealer "incentive 
trips" cost manufacturers $5 million in 1952, a trade 
publication called Sales Meetings estimates the tab is 
$100 million currently. While electrical appliances, in- 
cluding TV and radios, are most heavily involved, the 
practice has spread to many other businesses also. J. I. 
Case Co., the farm and construction equipment maker, 
spent $6 million on dealer meetings in the past four 
years, including one in Hawaii and a Bal Harbour. 
Florida session to which they flew 7,000 dealers and 
their wives. 

But these lavish junkets, ultimately paid for by 
the customer, are beginning to lose effectiveness, 
some think. Case's sales in 1960 fell off more than 
$70 million; officials say the high-pressure ballyhoo 
resulted in unrealistic orders which were cancelled 
when times got harder. One dealer in appliances 
was so eager for a trip that he ordered 60 air con- 
ditioners at one time — with a sales record of only 
25 in a year. He finally sold them out at cost, which 
was a blow to other dealers. And, says the article, 
some are afraid the public may lose confidence in 
dealers who go barging around on such trips — some 
have been invited on as many as a dozen jaunts in a 
year. 

As the old phrase goes, it's "nice work if you can 
get it." Unfortunately, we poor consumers can't get 
it — all we can do is pay for it. But then, it doesn't 
cost even GE too much — after all, it's tax deductible 
. . . Cost of doing business, you know. . . 



JULY, 1961 



13 




These 

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cluding new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course lor 
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Carpenters everywhere are 
using these Guides as'a Help- 
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• INSIDE TRADE INFORMATION ON: 

How to use the steel square • How to file and set saws • 
How to build furniture • How to use a mirre box • How 
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to make joints • Carpenters' arithmetic • Solving men- 
suration problems • Estimating strength of timbers • 
How to set girders and sills • How to frame houses andO^i 
roofs • How to estimate costs • How to build houses.^V^ 
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HIGHEST QUALITY 

CARPENTERS 
OVERALLS 

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KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



^^M 



attl 





America's Homemakers are Cost-conscious 



Many people are watching the fam- 
ily pocketbook more closely these 
days. And, if you're an expectant 
mother, you'll probably welcome sug- 
gestions for inexpensive maternity 
clothes to wear during the next few 
months. 

You can stay fashion-conscious and 
budget-wise by sewing your lady-in- 
waiting wardrobe with cotton bags. 
These containers, used for packaging 
feed, flour and other commodities, are 
attractive, durable and easy to 
launder. You'll find them in florals, 
plaids, checks, geometries, border 
prints — almost every design imagin- 
able, to suit any style or occasion. 

Bags provide attractive sewing 
fabric, but that's not all. They're 
highly economical, because the only 
cost is the thread and trimmings. By 
stretching your clothing dollar now, 
you'll be able to have that smart new 
sheath you've been hankering to buy 
after the baby comes. 

Before you start sewing, you'll want 
to save the number of containers 
needed for each outfit. One 100- 
pound bag contains about a yard and 
a third of material, and you'll need 
four or five matching ones for those 





A gay print smock and trim black pedal 
pushers all from cotton bags. 



expandable, and later expendable, 
maternity frocks. These containers 
come as a bonus when you buy feed, 
flour and other commodities. If you 
live on a farm or in the suburbs, you 
probably already have a supply of 
sacks on hand City dwellers usually 
can obtain them from textile shops 
or feed dealers. Why not ask your 
friends and relatives to help you save 
empty bags? 

When the sacks are collected, you'll 
find them easy to prepare for sewing. 
Simply rip the chain-stitched seams, 
soak off paper band labels or remove 
printed brand name with warm, soapy 
water, dry and press, and you're ready 
to begin placing your pattern. 

A well-planned maternity wardrobe, 
like any other, should be tailored to 
the tastes and activities of the wearer. 
If you're a full-time housewife, you'll 
want lounge wear, plus a dressy out- 
fit or two for shopping. If you're a 
working gal, you'll need darker, more 
tailored clothes. 

For variety, make a mix and match 
wardrobe from plain and print cotton 
bags. A basic collection might include: 

1 . A tailored, two-piece dress made 
from a dark print, suitable for shop- 
ping or afternoon wear. 

2. A slenderizing black skirt made 
from dyed osnaburg bags, with a 
sleeveless overblouse sewn from a 
paisley or small floral design. 

3. Black dyed osnaburg pedal 



pushers and a middy blouse in a 
bright novelty print. 

These three outfits, made from 
about a dozen empty sacks, can be 
interchanged to make six ensembles 
that will take you from the morning 
supermarket session to an afternoon 
shopping spree. What's more they've 
hardly made a dent in your bank bal- 
ance. 



An extremely pleasant custom that 
grows more popular with each year is 
the serving of tasty tidbits with bever- 
ages at a party or before a company 
dinner. Whatever you may call these 
appetite-teasers — canapes, appetizers 
or hors d'oeuvres — serving them 
strikes a note of informality, and when 
served before the meal they whet the 
appetite for the main courses to come. 

If you're curious about the different 
names of these "little foods", served 
both hot and cold, you'll be interested 
in the following explanations gathered 
from dictionaries and food ency- 
clopedias: 

Hors d'oeuvres. A French expres- 
sion, "hors" means "outside", and 
"oeuvres" means "main ingredients" — 
in other words, "outside the meal". 
The word is the same whether in 



a.i«g | 3Wbpi^ Tg ' 


1 






V|| g 









Slim skirt and attractive sleeveless blouse 
make a maternity wardrobe basics. 



JULY, 1961 



15 



singular or plural. It was first used 
to describe a number of little dishes 
served by French chefs who were try- 
ing to keep diners happy while the 
elaborate main courses were being 
prepared. Now, of course, in most 
countries the term describes any kind 
of small tasty dishes served before the 
meal, whether fish, meat, fowl, fruit, 
vegetable or other food. 

Appetizer. This is simply the Eng- 
lish word for hors d'oeuvres. 

Canape. This is the same French 
word that gives us "canopy". In every- 
day French, canape is a restful seat 
or settee, but in culinary French 
canapes are small pieces of bread or 
rolls which support small mouthfuls 
of fish, meat, fowl or anything else 
that is appetizing. Thus all canapes 
may be served as hors d'oeuvres or 
appetizers, but an hors d'oeuvres or 
appetizer is not a canape unless it is 
served on a small piece of bread or 
roll. 

Whatever you call your little ap- 
petite-teasers, you'll always find a wide 
and versatile selection in fishery pro- 
ducts which are always popular. 
Whether you choose to serve conveni- 
ence frozen foods like fish sticks or 
cooked shrimp; to open cans of some 
of the many kinds of herring, sardines, 



YATES AMERICAN 








Canapes, appetizers or hors d'oeuvres — 
delicious by any name. 

smoked salmon or anchovies; to make 
your own appetizers, such as tiny fish 
balls, clams or oysters casino; or to 
spread finely chopped or mashed fish 
on crackers or toast, you'll find fish 
or shellfish interesting to serve and 
delicious to eat. If you like to make 
your own, here are two favorites that 
are inexpensive yet "special" in ap- 
pearance and taste. 

Clams Casino (same recipe for 
oysters) 

Open clams carefully and retain the 
juices. Remove upper shells, leaving 
clams in deeper halves. Sprinkle each 
with a few drops of lemon juice and 
bits of finely minced green pepper, 
chopped onion and chopped bacon. 
Season with salt and pepper. Place 
in a shallow pan or on a cookie sheet 
and bake in a hot oven (450 degrees) 
until bacon crisps. 

Tiny Codfish Balls 

Shape canned codfish cakes into 
tiny round balls, % inch in diameter, 
and fry to a golden brown in deep 
hot fat. Serve with a cocktail pick 
stuck into each. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 




Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 




Belsaw Machinery Co., 
Kansas City, Mo 


25 


Construct-O-Wear Shoe Co., 
Indianapolis, Ind 


24 


Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


16 
8 


Estwing Mfg. Co., Rockford, III 


Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn... 


8 


Hydrolevel, Ocean Springs, Miss 


26 


Irwin Auger Bit Co., Wilmington, 
Ohio 


25 

14 


H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, Mo. .. 


National Supply & Hardware Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis 


16 
14 


Technical Courses and Books 

Audel Publishers, New York, N. Y. .. 


Chicago Technical College, 
Chicago, III 


14 


A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 


16 


H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 


22 



MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 
on each ^ 

STAIRCASE 



ELIASON 



P 
STAIR GAUGE 



\ 



Saves its cost in ONE day — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Guaranteed — made of 
nickel plated steel. 

Postpaid (cash with order) or C.O.D. 
plus postage; only. 



$12.95 




ELIASON TOOL 
COMPANY 

6944 Pillsbury Ave., So. 
Minneapolis 23, Minnesota 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease Vz inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is M, inch and they increase 
Vi" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9%" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and IN ONE MINUTE the cuts. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & IS44 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid-C.O.D. fee extra. 
Canada $2.75 Postpaid Money Orders. 
No C.O.D. 
Californians add 4% 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



PROGRESS 
REPORT 






Summer's heat has not slowed the progress on the 
Brotherhood's new Washington headquarters. In the pic- 
ture at upper left is the main entrance with its new, green 
shrubbery. The beautiful paneling of the huge board 
room is seen in the left center picture. The new Dark 
Room with some of its equipment is at lower left. The 
lights can be moved around the room on tracks along 
the ceiling. Workmen's cars are visible in the parking 
lot as seen from one of the offices in the picture at the 
top. Brother Fred Blankenship, Local 132, below, works 
on one of the handsome office doors. 



JULY, 196 1 



17 



OFFICIAL 
INFORMATION 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

John R. Stevenson 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

O. Wm. Blaier 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
3615 Chester Ave., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 4, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
11712 S. E. Rhone St., Portland 66, Ore. 

Eighth District, J. F. Cambiano 

17 Aragon Blvd., San Mateo, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 12, Ont., 
Canada 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



TO ALL FINANCIAL SECRETARIES — 

DEATH AND DISABILITY CLAIMS 



It is the desire of the General Office to process and 
properly dispose of all applications for funeral or 
disability donations as expeditiously as possible. Fi- 
nancial Secretaries can greatly assist us in that en- 
deavor by seeing that each claim is completely and 
properly filled out and promptly mailed directly to 
the GENERAL TREASURER, along with the re- 
quired supporting papers. 

As the funeral donation on the death of a member 
is payable to the decedent's estate, or to the person 
presenting proof that he or she has paid the funeral 
expenses, with each such claim we must have either 
Letters of Administration or the funeral bill, indicat- 
ing who the responsible person is. 



This is not required in a claim for funeral donation 
on the death of a member's wife or husband. In such 
claims the member should always be named as "Ap- 
plicant" for the donation, unless the member for 
some reason is incompetent and unable to take care 
of his or her own affairs. In that event we should have 
Power of Attorney or Guardianship papers. 

If there are any unusual circumstances in connec- 
tion with any claim, a full explanation should be 
forwarded with the application for funeral donation. 
By so doing you may eliminate much unnecessary 
correspondence and delay in the proper adjustment 
of the claim. 



NOTICE TO RECORDING SECRETARIES 



The Quarterly Circular for the months July, 
August and September, 1961, containing the quarterly 
password, has been forwarded to all Local Unions of 



the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in 
receipt of this circular should notify the General 
Secretary, Carpenters Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Religious Leaders Underscore 
Labors Stand on Migrants 




CONN 



By Harry Conn 
Press Associates, Inc. 

Written expressly for The Carpenter 

Washington — When organized reli- 
gion and organized labor stand shoul- 
der to shoulder in humanitarian 
endeavors "there'll 
be a great day 
acoming . . ." 

Nowhere is this 
better exemplified 
than in the joint 
efforts of these two 
great groups to 
elevate the farm 
worker to normal 
standards of de- 
cency and job se- 
curity. Represent- 
ing millions of Americans, they have 
a target in Public Law 78. 

Chances are, unless you live in the 
Southwestern United States, Public 
Law 78 doesn't mean a thing to you. 
And even if you do live in the South- 
west the law will have no direct im- 
pact on you unless you operate a 
corporation farm or work on one. 
Few Carpenters fit into these cate- 
gories but the indirect implications of 
the law and its moral impact means 
that it cannot be ignored. 

Based on Brotherhood 

Both religion and labor are founded 
on concepts of human brotherhood. 
Basically, this is why they are fighting 
Public Law 78. The law directs the 
Secretary of Labor to recruit some 
400,000 Mexican braceros to culti- 
vate our crops each year. 

Both the House and Senate have 
held hearings on whether to continue 
the law. In these hearings every na- 
tional religious group and every na- 
tional labor organization that testified 
called for either an immediate end to 
the bracero program or safeguards 
written into the law with a definite 
termination date in the next two years. 

Opposing these humanitarian-moti- 
vated groups were wealthy and power- 
ful organizations of growers who have 
richly profited from the bracero pro- 
gram. Use of Mexican contract 
laborers has enabled the growers to 
keep wages depressed and frustrate 



efforts to unionize the American farm 
workers. 

For the time being, it appears that 
wealth and power are riding high over 
humanitarianism. A coalition of con- 
servative Republicans and Dixiecrats 
joined forces and by a 231 to 157 
vote the House acted to continue the 
farm import program for another two 
years and did it without adding any of 
the safeguards sought by the religious 
and labor groups as well as the Ken- 
nedy Administration. 

Still Hope 

No vote has been taken in the Sen- 
ate so that the fight is not yet over. 
Opponents of Public Law 78 are still 
hopeful that efforts from the pulpits 
and union halls will convince enough 
Senators that American workers are 
being displaced by Mexican braceros 
at a time of high unemployment when 
jobs are scarce. 

If the Senate should vote to restrict 
or curtail the import program, the 
House and Senate conferees will meet 
in an effort to iron out the differences. 
Humanitarianism could yet win out. 

Whether success or failure, how- 
ever, the campaign of religious groups 
for social welfare legislation has 



much significance. Year by year reli- 
gious bodies have become more out- 
spoken on vital issues, lining up 
closer to organized labor. 

Most religious groups, for example, 
supported higher minimum wages and 
depressed area legislation. They are 
speaking out in favor of medical care 
for the aged through the Social Se- 
curity structure. And they have even 
exposed the evils of so-called "right 
to work" laws. 

So their efforts on behalf of the 
tragically exploited farm worker fits 
into the pattern. 

Take the case of the National 
Council of Churches. It represents 34 
Protestant church bodies with a total 
membership of 39 million persons. In 
a resolution adopted by the Council's 
board in February it declared that 
Public Law 78 "involves human and 
ethical issues of grave concern to the 
conscience of Christian people . . ." 

Two Main Reasons 

The resolution graphically sets forth 
the two main reasons for its position: 

1. "The importation program has 
injurious effects on the family and 
community life both of the Mexican 
nationals who are imported and on 
the domestic workers who, because of 
the presence of Mexican nationals, are 
deprived of employment or find it 
necessary to migrate in search of em- 
ployment, and 

2. "Importations tend to produce a 
labor surplus thereby depressing wages 
and labor standards for domestic ag- 
ricultural workers; and even if the 
United States has failed to make the 




Children of migratory workers are pressed into service at an early age in cotton 
fields, orchards and truck gardens. Religious leaders have become aroused. 



JULY, 1961 



19 



necessary adjustments to enable all 
farmers to secure an equitable share 
of the national income, there is no 
moral justification for perpetuation of 
substandard wages for agricultural 
labor." 

Testifying before Congress for the 
National Council were Rev. Victor C. 
Obenhaus and he was accompanied by 
Rev. William Scholes, western field 
representative of the Division of 
Home Missions of the Council. 

A similarly strong position against 
Public Law 78 was taken by Rev. 
James L. Vizzard when he testified on 
behalf of the National Catholic Rural 
Life Council. 

Concerned with Welfare 

He told the House hearing that it 
may seem strange that the NCRLC 
and "the other church organizations 
here represented have such a strong 
and continuing concern with matters 
of social and economic policy when 
the final objective justifying our exist- 
ence and our activity is the spiritual 
welfare of souls. 



"Yet it is too well known to need 
emphasis that the material conditions 
of men's lives can profoundly affect 
the spiritual. A blighted rural dis- 
trict or desperate personal poverty in 
the countryside can be as deadly to 
the life of the spirit as can an urban 
slum or a city breadline." 

Also testifying or supplying state- 
ments before Congressional hearings, 
in opposition to Public Law 78, were 
representatives of the Unitarian Fel- 
lowship for Social Justice, the Board 
of National Missions of the Evangeli- 
cal and Reformed Church, Young 
Christian Workers, National Catholic 
Welfare Conference and Board of 
Missions of the Methodist Church. 

Most of these groups took an even 
more militant position than did the 
Administration or the AFL-CIO. They 
wanted the import program halted 
immediately. The Administration and 
the AFL-CIO were willing to extend 
it two years provided there were very 
rigid safeguards. 





Illegal migrants are apprehended when found working in the United States illegally. 
Organized labor is seeking stricter enforcement and stronger laws to protect American 
farm workers and their families and provide better living standards. 



Asks Equal Treatment 

AFL-CIO Legislative Director An- 
drew J. Biemiller, in testifying before 
the House Committee, said the AFL- 
CIO hoped that growers would be 
denied use of braceros unless Ameri- 
can workers were given at least equal 
standards, that the imports be re- 
stricted to unskilled work, that the 
season for braceros be limited and 
that the Mexicans not be used as 
strikebreakers. He asked that the pro- 
gram be killed outright in two years. 

Studies made by the Department of 
Labor show that where Mexican im- 
ports are used heavily wages for 
American workers are pushed down. 
On the other hand, when higher 
wages are paid more domestic workers 
seek out the harvesting jobs. 

The impact of the bracero program 
was explained to Congress recently by 
Arnold Mayer, Washington represent- 
ative for the Amalgamated Meat Cut- 
ters. He declared: 

"When a grower needs workers, he 
offers jobs at a certain piece or wage 
rate — say 60 cents an hour. If dom- 
estic farm workers refuse the jobs 
because the pay is too low, the 
grower need not raise the wage to 
attract labor. He can tell the Federal 
Government that he is unable to get 
workers (true, at this wage rate) and 
he can normally get a group of 
braceros. 

"Actually, in many lush crop areas, 
the grower, farm worker and Govern- 
ment need not go through the initial 
stages of this game any more. Do- 
mestic farm workers have learned 
from experience to stay away from 
these areas. 

Effects Disastrous 

"As expected, the effect on farm 
labor income has been disastrous. 
Field labor wages in some parts of 
Texas have stayed at the same level 
for nearly a decade — at about 50 
cents an hour. Wages for cotton har- 
vesting have dropped in recent years." 

The bracero has something denied 
the domestic farm worker — a mini- 
mum wage. It's only 50 cents an 
hour. The domestic farm worker is 
also denied all the other protections 
which have been written into law for 
the craftsman and the factory worker: 
fair labor standards, prevailing wages 
under Davis-Bacon, abolition of child 
labor and so on. 

Both religious and union leaders be- 
lieve that as long as the Mexican bra- 
cero program continues the farm 
worker will continue to be a second- 
class citizen. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMORIAM 



L. U. NO. 10, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Froelich, John 
Grime, Alfred 
Heckman, Charles F. 
Jallits, Frank 
Johnson, John 



L. U. NO. 12, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Boutell, Dayton 

Zinsmeyer, William 



L. U. NO. 30, NEW LONDON, CONN. 
Farrar, Louis Lester 

L. U. NO. 33, BOSTON, MASS. 

Baker, Edmund 
Lovejoy, Joseph 
Morgan, Jacob H. 
Shaw, John 
Susnar, George 

L. U. NO. 40, BOSTON, MASS. 
Hawkes, John E. 



L. U. NO. 44, 

CHAMPAIGN-URBANA. ILL. 

James, E. P. 
Jensen. Andrew 
Marr, William J. 



L. U. NO. 61, KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Bolden, Ray 
Brewer, W. B. 
Danielson, Henry 
Dickey, Byron M. 
Gargliardi, Vincent 
Howell, Hershell 
Knoth, Jess 
Mayfleld, Thomas A. 
McFall, William B. 
Morast, H. L. 
Petry, Roland 
Potts, C. F. 
Quick, A. C. 
Ramey, William 
Snyder, William 
Solomon. J. P. 
Straton. William 
Strelluf. Andrew 
Way, T. E. 
Wright, James G. 

L. U. NO. 96, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Poirier, Oscar 

L. U. NO. 101, BALTIMORE, MO. 
Lawrence, Leroy A. 

L. U. NO. 103, BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Barnett, P. T. 
Hagood. H. E. 
Smith, T. J. 

L. U. NO. 129, HAZLETON, PA. 
Ganss, Walter H. 



L. U. NO. 132, WASHINGTON, 0. C. 

Bassett, William H. 
Givers, R. E. 
Green, William Russel 
Jarmanes, James W. 
Leatherwood. George J. 
Lingebach, William L. 
Richardson, Harold 
Speiden, Robert V. Sr. 
Stockman, W. H. 
Wright, Elisha B. 
Young, Robert E. 

L. U. NO. 143, CANTON, OHIO 
Schoeppner, Joseph H. 

L. U. NO. 213, HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Aseltine. Earl 
Boatman. Leo 
Bryan, Prentice 
Chambers, T. C. 
Humphreys, I. D. 
Thomason, W. L. 
Torrance, Walter J. 
Wicks, E. D. 

L. U. NO. 218, BOSTON, MASS. 

Caprio. John 
Conti, Anthony 
Farnell, Charles G. 
Lunetta, Joseph 
Moores, John 
Mosher, Clarence W. 

L. U. NO. 225, ATLANTA, GA. 

Clyburn, J. B. 
Marks, James W. 
Sewell, Van D. 
Sibley, N. C. 
Thompson, W. Y. 
Tuggle, George 
Young. Norman J. 

L. U. NO. 232, FORT WAYNE, IND. 

Boyette, George 
Johnson, John 
Lee, William 
Sorgen. Clarence 
Whitacre, James 

L. U. NO. 235, RIVERSIDE, CAL. 

Brashears. Burl W. 
Prichard, Dale N. 
Sayre. Leo Oliver 
Stewart, Wesley W. 
Tuchfarber. H. S. 

L. U. NO. 239, EAST0N, PA. 
Beers. Frank E. 

L. U. NO. 246, NEW YORK CITY. N. Y. 
Van Steen. George 

L. U. NO. 257, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Christenson. Knute 
Ecklund, Axel 
Gavin, Thomas 



L. U. NO. 259, JACKSON, TENN. 
Smith, M. L. 

L. U. NO. 264, MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Becker, August 
Guse, Otto 
Rehm, Edward 
Vick, William 
Wanamaker, Charles 
Werner, Fred 

L. U. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILL. 

Cambe, Paul 
Hall, Robert 
Klepper, John 
Lickfers, William 
Peninger, George 
Rieck, Max 
Swingler. Edward 
Yancy, Gordon 
Young, Leonard 
Zinker, Frank 

L. U. NO. 275, NEWTON, MASS. 
Linardy, Antone 

L. U. NO. 301, NEWBURGH, N. Y. 
Tweed, William D. 

L. U. NO. 344, WAUKESHA, WISC. 

Johnson, Louis G. 
Simon, Peter C. 

L. U. NO. 350, NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Soppelsa. Eugenio 

L. U. NO. 366, BRONX, N. Y. 

Belote. William A. 
DeNunzio. Vincent 
Edelman, Benjamin 
Spellman, John 

L. U. 369, 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N.Y. 

Hilferding, Henry A. 
Klesat, Edward L. 

L. U. NO. 403, ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Bize, Maurice J. 
Branton. G. P. 

L. U. NO. 608, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Coen, James 
Conserva, Donato 
MacDonald, Alexander 
McCloskey. Patrick 
Zsula, John 



L. U. NO. 767, OTTUMWA, IOWA 

Cain, Robert E. 
Huber, Carl H. 



L. U. NO. 787, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Jensen, Jens 

L. U. NO. 791, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Hamlin, Fred 
Skaar, Ole 

L. U. NO. 792, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Fairclough, Harold 
Jackson, Charles 
Leider, William 
Nelson, Gust A. 
Oberg, Fritz 

L. U. NO. 1089, PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Harris, George H. 
Harris, Walter F. 
Hynes, Robert 

L. U. NO. 1098, BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Barbay, Charles 
Couvillon, Dudley J. 

L. U. NO. 1114, S. MILWAUKEE. WISC. 
Kuban. John 

L. U. NO. 1194, PENSAC0LA, FLA. 
Cumbie. W. C. 

L. U. NO. 1258, POCATELL0, IDA. 

Emond. Wilfred 
Erickson. Felix 

L. U. NO. 1323, MONTEREY, CAL. 
Maxwell. Levi 

L. U. NO. 1360, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Jette. Ovila 

L. U. NO. 1397, ROSLYN. N. Y. 

Angus, William 

L. U. NO. 1407, WILMINGTON, CAL. 
Barnett, Erik M. 



L. U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS 

Phillips, E. E. (Freer, Texas) 



L. U. NO. 627, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. L U - N0 - 1478 ' RED0ND0 BEflCH - cflL 



Brent, George 
Carver, John N. 
Crawford, B. F. 

L. U. NO. 746, NORWALK, CONN. 
Banks, Clarence 



Butler, W. L. 

Hill, Owen Edmond Sr. 

L. U. NO. 1509, MIAMI, FLA. 

Baker, William S. 
Bakaty, Michael F. 



JULY, 1961 



21 



L. U. NO. 1595, CONSHOHOCKEN, PA. 

Ciociola, Charles 
Clemens, Harry 
Krieg, Clarence M. 

L. U. NO. 1598, VICTORIA, B. C. 

Porteous, John 

L. U. NO. 1681, HORNELL, N. Y. 

Cline, Floyd M. 

L. U. NO. 1683, EL DORADO, ARK. 
Peters, W. R. 



L. U. NO. 1786, CHICAGO, ILL 

Sherry, John 
Vodak, John 

L. U. NO. 1822, FT. WORTH, TEXAS 
Grider, J. H. 

L. U. NO. 1849, PASCO, WASH. 

Bentley, Frank 
Connerly, Dave 
Dahl, Edward W. 
Epperly, John 



Hansen, George 
Jackson, Dick 
Knight, Harry G. 
Leingang, Anton 
Lindberg, Victor 
Paige, L. E. 
Paris, William E. 
Pierce, William Lee 
Rosander, Ben 
Vetter, William F. 

L. U. NO. 1922, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Hiller, Ben. 
Miller. Louis W. 



L. U. NO. 2039, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Delpit, Ernest 

L. U. NO. 2230, GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Kirkpatrick, G. H. 

L. U. NO. 2340, BRADENTON, FLA. 

Sufferling, Cornelius 

L. U. NO. 2435, INGLEW00D, CAL 

Watts. Ralph A. 



Rutgers Awards Distinguished 
Service Medal to Rajoppi 




Second District Board Member Raleigh Rajoppi receives the Rutgers Medal from 
President Mason W. Cross of Rutgers University. 



Raleigh Rajoppi, President of the 
New Jersey State Council of Car- 
penters, and Second District Board 
Member of the United Brotherhood, 
was the recipient of the Rutgers medal 
at the annual commencement of the 
Union Leadership Academy held in 
the University Commons on May 20. 

The medal, symbolic of distin- 
guished service to the university, was 
conferred by Rutgers President Mason 
W. Gross. 

The citation said, "You have dis- 
played a continuing interest in edu- 
cation over the years as manifested, 
for example, by your leadership in the 
purchase, by the Brotherhood, of the 
William Hutcheson Memorial Forest, 



a leading national center for botanical 
research. Further, you have encour- 
aged members within your jurisdiction 
to participate fully in the educational 
program of the Rutgers Institute of 
Management and Labor Relations and 
made it possible for your members to 
enroll in the Union Leadership 
Academy". 

The Union Leadership Academy 
was created 6 years ago as a part of 
the Labor Program of the Rutgers 
Institute of Management and Labor 
Relations. It is now a cooperative 
endeavor of Rutgers, Penn State, 
Cornell and West Virginia Universi- 
ties, four departments of the AFL- 
CIO and thirteen international unions. 



114 Surplus Areas 

The Department of Commerce has 
listed 1 14 areas in 29 states as eligible 
for Federal aid under the Depressed 
Areas Act. These areas have been 
designated as those with surplus work- 
ers — that is more workers than jobs. 
Pennsylvania has 20 areas and Illinois 
six. 



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remittance comes with order. No C.O.D. to 
Canada. 



Order u u 

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Cicr Ci E -'-'-' So - Const. St. 
9IEVCLC Emporia, Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Random Reading 



"Working Men", New Book Designed 
For Young Readers, is Praised 



From time to time THE CAR- 
PENTER has expressed its editorial 
concern that too many young people 
today are growing up without a 
knowledge of the history of organized 
labor. Far too many young people 
joining the labor market these days 
accept the benefits that collective bar- 
gaining brings them without any un- 
derstanding of or sympathy for the 
long, hard struggle that brought to- 
day's benefits into existence. Children 
who grow up in the homes of union 
members should not be as ignorant of 
these matters as children who have no 
personal contact with unions but often 
union members themselves fail to 
teach their youngsters the story of 
their great heritage. Now a new book 
has come along that tells well the 
story for young people. It is "Work- 
ing Men: The Story of Labor" by 
Sidney Lens. Here is the whole 
stormy history of the labor movement 
in America. This is the first book for 
young people which presents the 
problems of the labor movement 
against the background of American 
history itself. 

The reader is given an insight not 
only into the story of unions and their 
strikes, but the role of labor as a 
social and political force is well-de- 
fined. Historical perspective is given 
to the conflict between Jefferson and 
Hamilton, the impact of Jacksonian 
democracy, the role of Lincoln in the 
Civil War, the "gilded age", the 



WORKING 
MEN 



J SIDNEY J LfN; 




"golden twenties", the great depres- 
sion, the New Deal and today's post- 
war world. 

Through all of this the author skill- 
fully weaves the ebb and flow of the 
labor movement. In some detail Lens 
recalls the first unions, the labor 
parties, the co-operatives and such 
early groups as the Knights of Labor. 

Fortunately, Lens has included an 
excellent glossary of labor terms. 
These are the special words and 
phrases that are used by those in the 
labor movement but too often the 
words are meaningless to outsiders. 

The line drawings by David Collier 
used to illustrate the book have simple 
dignity and greatly enhance the text. 

This may be a book for young peo- 
ple but any adult can read it to learn 
or to refresh his memory of the gal- 
lant story of the working man in 
America. 

Often the officers of the Locals are 
looking for some suitable memorial 
for a member of the Brotherhood. 
The presentation of this book together 
with a memorial inscription to any 
public or school library would be a 
lasting and influential monument to 
any worthy carpenter. 

A word about the author: Sidney 
Lens has been active in the American 
labor movement for 30 years. He is 
the author of several books and 
numerous articles on labor matters. 
He lives in Chicago. 

"Working Men: The Story of 
Labor" is published by Putman and 
sells for $2.95. It can be bought in 
any bookstore. 

"Blueprint Reading," Guide to 
Working Plans, Available 

"Blueprint Reading: An Interpre- 
tation of Architectural Working 
Plans" is a handsome new study guide 
recently published by Prentice-Hall. 
It sells for $6.65. 

The author, William J. Hornung, is 
Director of the National Technical 
Institute and member of the teaching 
staff of New York University. His 
new book offers easy-to-follow direc- 
tions for understanding and inter- 
preting plans, elevations, cross-sec- 
tions, wall sections, and enlarged 
detailed drawings. Explaining the 



meanings of various lines, symbols, 
and conventions as they occur, the 
book facilitates learning by immediate 
association. 

Each chapter presents an individual 
phase of the subject covered. This 
book was written specifically for the 
building trades and it contains precise 
technical information, self-examina- 
tions and a concluding section on self- 
testing assignments. It is crammed 
with point-by-point professional know- 
how. It has important cross-reference 
questions and answers, numerous illu- 
strative drawings and a glossary of 




terms and a list of common abbrevia- 
tions to eliminate technical stumbling 
blocks. 

"Blueprint Reading" can be pur- 
chased at any bookstore or ordered 
direct from Prentice-Hall, Englewood, 
N. J. 

Pamphlet on Canada Gets 
Reviewer's Recommendation 

Canada and the United States — 
Neighbors in Democracy" is a pam- 
phlet reprint of the annual report of 
Distillers Corporation — Seagrams Ltd. 
It is being distributed free by Mr. S. 
Bronfman, the president of the cor- 
poration. The 38-page booklet is a 
superb study of the Congressional and 
Parliamentary systems under which 
these two great governments operate. 
It answers many questions, it explains 
many differences and it illuminates 
many of our common problems. The 
House of Seagrams is to be congratu- 
lated for doing a public service. Wide- 
spread reading of "Canada and the 
United States" would lead to better 
understanding on both sides of the 
border. Incidentally, the pamphlet is 
not only packed with knowledge but 
it is also a thing of beauty. Mr. 
Bronfman will be happy to send any 
reader of the THE CARPENTER a 
free copy. His address is 1430 Peel 
St., Montreal 2, Canada. 



JULY, 196 1 



23 



\»l 







By FRED GOETZ 



Izaak Still in Style 

Tons and tons of literature has been 
written on the angling arts, all phases 
of it: fly fishing, bait casting, trolling, 
surf fishing, spin fishing, drift angling 
and other techniques but little has 
been written on what is perhaps the 
most universal form of angling: "Still 
fishing." 

Each angling method has its merits 
and I won't argue with anyone as to 
what is the most satisfying technique. 
It's a matter of choice. But for a 
downright relaxing approach to fish- 
ing fun, ya' just can't beat the bottom- 
bait and bobber rig. The beloved 
Izaak Walton sub-titled his famous 
book; the Compleat Angler, The Con- 
templative Man's Recreation. What 
is more typical of that than still fish- 
ing? 




Two fisherfolk who will go along 
with that philosophy are Bert Fore- 
man of Lodi, New York and his dad. 
Bert has been a member of Local 603 
out of Ithaca for 18 years, his dad is 
a retired member of the same local. 
Bert sends in the following photo of 
his dad, a' still fishing from the bank 
of the Clyde River, where he says 
there is a goodly number of pike. 

Here's hoping, Bert, that you and 
your dad get your share this year. 



Lu's Friend Jake 

Lu Richardson of 1608 Linwood, 
Parsons, Kansas, a member of Local 
1022, recalls that in all his outdoor 
meandering last year one saunter 
stands out as memorable — the time 
that he, and his party (four friends 
who had never hunted before) all got 
a limit of upland game birds. 

It wasn't the number of quail in 
the sack that delighted; no, it was the 
action; the delight of the new hunters 
in the sport and the blue-ribbon per- 
formance of "Jake," his English setter. 

And here's a photo of "Jake," 
pointing to one in the brush. 



Squirrel Loses Twice 

Out from the town of Glenville, 
West Virginia, Billy Schimmel was 
hunting with his Grandpa Davis. 

They sat in the woods very quietly, 
saw nothing, heard nothing for the 
longest time. 

Then overhead appeared a large 
hawk, carrying a red squirrel in its 
talons. Billy drew a bead and let go 
with his .410 shotgun. 

The hawk flopped around in the 
sky a bit, a few feathers scattered into 
the wind, and down at Billy's feet 
tumbled the squirrel — with a single 
pellet in it! 





This is "Jake." 



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24 



THE CARPENTER 




THE CARPENTER will pay $5.00 
for each job pointer accepted and 
published. Send along your pet trick 
for making a job easier. It can earn 
you five dollars and the gratitude of 
your fellow members. Include a rough 
sketch from which we can make a 
drawing. When the same idea is sub- 
mitted by more than one reader, the 
letter bearing the earliest postmark 
will he awarded the check. 



Miter Block 



-1 X -* Ail" BLOCK 
CUT CORNER s^ 
TO CORNER 




X fa A IZ' BOARD 



Take a piece of 4 x 4 — 3W long, 
cut it from corner to corner, making 
a 45-degree side. Then bolt block to 
a piece of 1 x 6 — 12" long, saw on 
any desired side to make a 45-degree 
miter or a square cut. This type of 
miter will not cut out like the conven- 
tional type of miter box. 

John F. Arnold 

(L. U. No. 61) 

6000 Saida 

Kansas City 23, Mo. 



Handy Lubricant 

To keep my measuring tape in good 
working order, I have found the most 
effective lubricant to be the wax paper 
from my lunch box. The wax is handy 
and it does not pick up the dirt like 
other oils or lubricants. 



Ralph E. Ferguson 
(L. U. 668) 
645 S. Fifth St. 
San Jose, Calif. 



Right Size Wrench 




Ever find yourself without the right 
size Allen wrench? Here is a solution. 
Cut the tang of a triangle file at the 
right place for size. Use it straight 
with a pair of pliers, or heat and bend 
to a right angle. 

Milo L. Curts 
(L. U. No. 1664) 
Route 1, Box 250 
Bloomington, Ind. 

Glass Cutting 

In making difficult cuts on a piece 
of window glass, hold the glass under 
water and cut with a pair of tin-snips. 
It will cut like a piece of chalk. 

Fred Mayer, 50-year member 

(L. U. No. 602) 

95285 Sequoia Dr. 

St. Louis 23, Mo. 

Handy Aid 

On the faces of all my "C" and 
bar clamps I glue pieces of innertubes. 
using rubber-to-metal adhesive. This 
saves trying to hold clamp blocks, the 
clamp, and closing the clamp — for 
which we should have three hands. 
Bruce V. Reppert 
(L. U. No. 492) 
R. D. #3 
Boyertown, Pa. 




I MAKE $500 an hour 

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in my 

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BUSINESS 

- Grower Squires 



3* 





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good steady cash income with 
your own COMPLETE SHARP- 
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mower blades ... all cutting 
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experience needed. 

FREE BOOK tells howyoucan 
start your own retirement 
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payments only $15.00 a month. 
Send coupon today. 



BELSAW Sharp-All Co , 7122 Field Bldg., 

Kansas City 11, Mo. 
Send FREE Book "LIFETIME SECURITY.' 

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3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for oil electric drills. 
Bores up to 5 times foster in any wood, at any 
angle. Sizes Y-t" to 1", $.75 each. Sizes IVe" to 
PA", $1.25 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /$" to 
3". Only $4.00. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, s / e " to l%". Only $3.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes Va" *o 
I'/j". As low as $1.05 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for 50 ft. sixe 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision mode of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
perfect chalk line every time. 









IRWIN 

every bit as good as the name 



Wilmington, 
Ohio 



JULY, 1961 



25 



<^Z//&z£o'7%e&j 



This column is devoted to introducing 
new developments in materials and prod- 
ucts to our members. The articles are 
presented merely to inform our readers, 
and their publication is not to be con- 
strued as an indorsement, since all the 
information is based on claims made by 
the makers. Those interested in obtain- 
ing further details regarding any product 
are requested to write to the company 
rather than to THE CARPENTER or 
the General Office. 

Open the Door, Richard 

Contractors and builders attending 
this year's trade shows are being in- 
troduced to a new remote-control 
garage-door operator developed by 
Berry Door Corp., carrying a five-year 
guarantee. 

Designed for 30-minute installation 
on any one-piece or sectional door, 
the new Berry operator is so simple 
that builders will rarely be bothered 
with service calls because most main- 
tenance can be handled by the home- 
owner. 

In addition to ease of installation, 
builders and contractors are reportedly 
impressed with the new operator's 




fully adjustable safety clutch and 
automatic, self-adjusting, full-chain 
tension and drive. There is also a 
detachable operating arm for manual 
operation. 

The transmitter on the new Berry 
operator is a transistorized remote- 
control unit about twice the size of a 
package of cigarettes. It is completely 
portable and requires no installation 
in the automobile. It can be moved 
from car to car or will actuate the 
door from inside the house. 

The signal from this unit opens the 
door and turns on the light. The light 
stays on when the door is open; when 



the door is closed, the light is ex- 
tinguished. 

The entire unit powered by a Va - 
horsepower electric motor comes to 
the installation site fully assembled. 

Art and Wine 

An old world art — wine cask 
carving — is brought to life in Cali- 
fornia by sculptor Kilgore Kirby. 
Such carvings were common centuries 
ago and some still can be seen in the 
world's great wine areas, but the 
technique of sculpting the casks was 
long thought to have vanished. Kirby, 
a sculptor and artist all his life (who 
lives in San Mateo), is reviving it in 
California with the hope it will stimu- 
late the use of wood sculpture to lend 
warmth to the cold glass, stainless 
steel and concrete of modern archi- 
tecture. He is shown employing 
mallet and chisel on a giant cask 
head which is to adorn a fashionable 
San Francisco area restaurant (Zack's 
in Sausalito). At lower right is the 
sketch he is following. The cask once 
held 6,000 gallons of California wine 
for aging. 

The Wine Institute, 717 Market St. 
San Francisco, Cal., will be happy to 



Accurate, Easy 
LEVELING 




for FLOORS 
..FOOTINGS 



The old reliable water level is now modernized 
into an accurate low-cost layout level. 50 ft. clear 
tough vinyl tube gives you 100 ft. of leveling in 
each set-up, and more if necessary. With its 
special container-reservoir, only 7" dia. x 4", the 
LEVELEASY remains filled and ready for fast 
one-man leveling. Compact and durable, this 
amazing level is packed with complete illustrated 
instructions on modern liquid leveling. 

Stop wasting time and money on makeshift 
methods. Thousands of carpen- 
ters and builders everywhere 
have found the LEVELEASY sim- 
ple and fast as a steel tape and 
just as accurate. It pays its way. 

If your tool dealer has not yet stocked Leveleasy, 
use our quick mail service. Send your check or 
money order for only $7.95 today by airmail and 
have your level on the way tomorrow. Money 
back guarantee. 

Please rush ( ) Leveleasy(s) 

Q Check or money order enclosed 

□ C.O.D. $7.95 ea. plus postal charges 

□ Purchase order attached 

□ FREE LITERATURE 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto Ave., Ocean Springs, Mississippi 
RST IN LIQUID LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




V- 



y 



send any reader of THE CAR- 
PENTER a free pamphlet "Little 
Wine Cellar All Your Own". The 
pamphlet tells the householder how 
any home may have a wine cellar. 




26 



THE C ARPENTER 




Arizona Honors Apprentices in Awards Program 







Front Row: Kenneth Henderson, Robert Artherton, Dan Ginn, 
Arthur Cox, Arnulfo Ohton, Raymond Stewart, John Fredre- 
gill, Delno Martenson, Richard Mills, Carroll Fitchett. Middle 
Row: Alex Gordoa, Louis Rippstein, Gilbert Soto, Samuel 
Tharp, Robert Stanley, Robert Pais, Ronald Fischer, Robert 
Koons, Charles Smith, Terrance Knowles. Back Row: Robert 



Hook, Rosario Figueroa, Ronald Owsley, Don Williams, John 
Thomas, Dennis Furlone. Completing, but not shown in 
picture: Billy Joe Cowan, Marvin H. Davis, Dan DeWitt, 
George Frost, Elvan E. Hiser, Jr., Joe House, Thomas F. 
Moore, Ralph G. Reid, and Michael Ware. A meritorious 
award was made to Julius Pitrat, retiring co-ordinator. 



The Central Arizona Carpenters 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee held 
their annual Completion and Awards 
Ceremony May 26, 1961 in the 
Phoenix Union High School Audi- 
torium. 

Completing their four years of ap- 
prenticeship were thirty-five men from 
the Central Arizona Area. At this 
time, these young men were presented 
certificates of completion by the Direc- 
tor of the Arizona Apprenticeship 
Council, Steve Medigovich and 
awarded United Brotherhood Journey- 
man Certificates by Bob Barrett, Sec- 
retary of the Central Arizona District 
Council of Carpenters. 

The new journeymen were also 
awarded certificates by the Phoenix 



Union Adult Evening School for com- 
pletion of four years related technical 
training. 

Principal speaker of the evening 
was Leslie Mahoney of the architec- 
tural firm. Lescher & Mahoney, speak- 
ing on "Carpentry and Building 
— Past, Present and Future." 

Each new journeyman was awarded 
a set of Audels, given by the Arizona 
Carpenters' Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee. E. J. Wasielewski, a management 
member of the Committee, made the 
presentation. 

Jerry Crittenden, Central Arizona 
Outstanding Apprentice of 1960, was 
awarded a special certificate by Clyde 
English, Chairman of the Central 
Arizona Carpenters J.A.C. and Ken- 



neth Zuidema, Secretary. 

Outstanding attendance awards were 
made to Dennis Furlone, Joe House 
and Arnulfo Ohton by Vernon Foster, 
executive secretary of the Arizona 
Carpenters' Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee. 

A meritorious service award was 
made to Julius Pitrat, Central Area 
Co-ordinator, who retired after many 
years of service. The presentation was 
made by John Douthit, State Super- 
visor, U. S. Department of Labor, 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing. 

The affair was attended by repre- 
sentatives of management and labor 
as well as the wives, parents and 
friends of the new journeymen. 



Blaier Speaks in Johnstown 



Local 1419, Johnstown, Penna., recently celebrated its guests included Charles M. Slinker. International Repre- 



58th anniversary in gala style. 

Among those attending the affair held in the 
Masonic Temple was O. William Blaier, 2nd General Vice- 
President of the Brotherhood, who spoke. Other honored 



sentative and President of the Pennsylvania State Council 
of Carpenters; James A. Kunes, Secretary and Treasurer 
of the State Council, and Patrick Cosgrove, Vice-President 
of the Pittsburgh District Council. 



JULY, 1961 



27 



Secretary Goldberg Honors Apprentice 




Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg recently honored 
Brother William H. Meyers, Jr., Local 1665, as the Out- 
standing Apprentice in the Building and Construction 
Trades for 1960. 

The District of Columbia Apprenticeship Council 
selected Brother Meyers on the basis of his accomplish- 
ments as the winner of the highest scholastic achievements 
awards comprising a $350 J. C. A. C. Scholarship; a 
bronze plaque sponsored by his own Local 1665 and a 
$100 U. S. Savings Bond. He was also cited for his 
accomplishments during his on-the-job training and for 



the fact that he was immediately promoted to foreman 
level upon the completion of his apprenticeship. He was 
shortly thereafter promoted to the status of Superintendent, 
Grunley-Walsh Construction Co., Inc. 

Brother Meyers is shown in the above photograph 
receiving the 6th Annual Bridges-Randolph Award from 
Secretary Goldberg. On the far right, is 2nd General 
Vice-President O. William Blaier. At the far left is 
Nicholas R. Loope of the Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship 
Committee. The award was presented in Mr. Goldberg's 
Washington office. 



Ladies Auxiliary 797 




To the Editor: 

On March 8, 1961, Carpenters' Auxiliary No. 797, 
Kalispell, Montana, was organized and received its charter. 
Officers were elected and installed. They are shown in 
the picture, from left to right, as follows: 

Mrs. Ann Miller, warden; Mrs. Ida Kortum, trustee; 
Mrs. Martha Petersen, vice president; Mrs. Dorothy 
Chilson, trustee; Mrs. Helen Root, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Mae Sudan, president; Mrs. Annabelle Harris, con- 
ductor; Mrs. Edyth Barce, financial secretary-treasurer, 
and Mrs. Charles Lengstorf, trustee. 

We have one business meeting each month, on the 
fourth Wednesday, at which time we serve refreshments 



to our sponsoring local union at their meeting also. 

We would be happy to hear from other auxiliaries on 
any good ideas for projects and membership. 

Helen Root, Recording Secretary 

1145 4th Ave., W. 

Kalispell, Mont. 



Santa Ana Gives Three Pins 



( 




Three members of Local 2172, Santa Ana, Cal., were 
awarded 25-year pins. Left to right are Arnold St. George, 
President, who gave out the pins and Andrew Znetko and 
Erhardt Petersen, recipients. Jack Sundin, not shown but also 
eligible was confined to his home because of sickness. 



LOOK FOR TH€ 
CtMOAt -A 
CAS50 




28 



THE CARPENTER 



Two Veterans Get Plaques 



Proud of His Craft 




Local 503, DePew & Lancaster, N. Y., recently pre- 
sented plaques and gifts to two veteran Brothers who 
are retiring. 

Front row, left to right, Joseph Sojka, Local Trustee; 
Pensioner Stanley Derjko, member of the Brotherhood 
since 1927; Pensioner Alvin Girardin of Local 2052. He 
has been a member of the Brotherhood since 1917. He 
is seen receiving his plaque from President Otto Meyer. 

In the background, left to right, are Anthony Suchyna, 
Treasurer; Henry J. Nijadlik, Recording Secretary; Leon- 
ard Kisiel, Delegate to the District Council and Local 
Trustee; Jerome H. Naurocki, Financial Secretary; Leon- 
ard Putzback, Vice-President, and James Kozlowski, Sgt.- 
at-Arms. 



Newport Celebrates Birthday 




On May 7 Local 176, Newport, R. I., celebrated its 
75th birthday. Some 350 members, wives and guests 
attended the anniversary banquet at the Shamrock Cliff 
Hotel. 

Brother Harry P. Hogan, General Representative of the 
Brotherhood, was the speaker. 

Among the distinguished guests were Cornelius C. 
Moore, toastmaster and attorney for Local 176; Lt. Gov. 
Edward P. Gallogly, Mayor James L. Maher. Edwin C. 
Brown, Secretary-Treasurer of the Rhode Island AFL-CIO, 
.ind Clifford J. Cawley, State Director of Labor. 

In the picture, left to right. Charles McLeish. Local 176 
President; Harry Hogan, General Representative: Albert 
Fournier. Business Agent of Local 176; Cornelius Moore, 
toastmaster, and Lt. Gov. Gallogly. 




Brother Luther Moll, Treasurer of Local 314, Madison, 
Wis., displays the historic plaque which he assisted in 
designing and building. The plaque will be installed at 
the Carpenter Shop in the pioneer village at Nelson Dewey 
State Park, Cassville, Wis. 

The Carpenter Shop, which will help preserve the 
history of the wood-working industry in Wisconsin, is to 
be dedicated to the memory of the late Fred E. Gastrow. 
one of the founders and first President of the Wisconsin 
State Council of Carpenters. Brother Gastrow also served 
as Representative of the Brotherhood. 

Brother Moll is a member of a family that has a 
remarkable record in the Brotherhood. His father was 
treasurer of the local and his uncle was President. 



Apprentices Honored 




Local 1382, Rochester. Minn., honored 15 apprentices 
at a recent banquet. The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Raymond J. 
Jansen was the speaker. 

Shown in the front row left to right are Eugene Weis. 
chairman, representing employers; Earl Leach, instructor: 
Leon W. Vanberg. committee member: Ralph Hammond, 
committee member, and Floyd Whipple, member of the 
committee representing employers. Back row left to right 
are the apprentices — Roger Lubahn, William Frutiger. 
Leo Muller. Robert Schley. Donald Wittlief. Donald 
Clark. Dale Tlougan. Willard Grimm and Paul Lange. 
Other apprentices not present for the picture were Donald 
McLagen, Marlin Haack, William Berk, Henry Oots. 
Lewis Larsen and Louis Mueller. 



JULY, 1961 



29 



Local 2212 Helps Girl Scouts 



Brothers Going to Fair in 1964 



iffi 




Over the years the members of Local 2212, East 
Orange, N. J., have given of their time and skills to assist 
Boys' Clubs, Volunteer Ambulance Squads and other civic 
groups. Recently they completed the task of installing a 
tile floor in the new headquarters of the West Hudson 
Girl Scout Council. 

Sixteen members of the Local are shown above with 
Jack R. Spaeth, official of the Newark Parquet Flooring 
Co.; Mrs. Frederick Gillespie, Girl Scout Council Presi- 
dent; Mayor and Mrs. Joseph Healey and James P. Pat- 
terson, Business Representative of Local 2212. 



Buckeyes Honor Llewellyn 





Charles Llewellyn has served as treasurer of Local 716, 
Zanesville, O., for more than 50 years. He was recently 
honored at a dinner for members and their wives. 

Shown above, left, is Local 716 President J. E. Showers, 
Llewellyn and C. W. Leffler, right, who received his 50- 
year membership pin. Twenty-five year membership pins 
were given to Walter Forsythe, Henry Fuchs, Fred Long, 
Lawrence Pflieger, Phillip Schlaegel, Paul Schultheis, 
Bryce Showers, Neal Smitley and Bert Wayble. 



Ted Is the Man 

Brother Ted Kenney, President of the Chicago District 
Council, was named "Labor Man of the Year" by the 
Junior Association of Commerce of Chicago. He received 
a plaque attesting to this honor at a dinner held at the 
Ambassador West Hotel. 



k ■; 




The New York State Council of Carpenters has selected 
the new Americana Hotel in New York City for its 1964 
meeting. The announcement was made by President 
Charles Johnson, Jr. The conference dates will be August 
13, 14, 15, 1964 and will be scheduled so as to allow all 
delegates and their families to visit the 1964 New York 
World's Fair. 

The Americana, now under construction and slated to 
open in mid- 1962, is one of New York City's first hotels 
in 30 years. The fifty-story structure will have 2,000 
guest rooms, a built-in garage and 7 restaurants. It is lo- 
cated on the east side of Seventh Avenue between 52nd 
and 53rd Streets. 



Local 286 Helps 'Envoy' 

Local 286, Great Falls, Montana, gave $100 to Miss 
Stanlee Ann Wardinsky, who has been chosen by the 
American Field Service as an exchange student. Miss 
Wardinsky, a high school pupil, will spend the summer 
in The Netherlands. She will use the money to help 
defray her expenses. 

Brother Stanley H. and Mrs. Wardinsky are the proud 
parents of this young American 'ambassador'. 



30 



THE C ARPENTER 



The Eyes of Texas 



California Carpenters Honored 




Local 2238, Sweetwater, Tex., recently gave 25-year pins to 
Brothers E. C. Roach, Ben Koen and V. B. Billiard. 




The third annual banquet of Local 876, Hamilton, Mass., 
was held in honor of 5 veteran members. Fifty year pins 
were presented to Ray Knowlton, Frank Burton, Frank 
Buzzell, Alex MacDonald and Percival Burton, shown above, 
left to right. 

Local 109 Selects Olive 




Local 109, Sheffield, Alabama, has selected William F. 
Olive, as Outstanding Apprentice to attend the Southern States 
Apprenticeship Conference in Jackson, Mississippi, on July 27 
through July 29. Left to right are D. H. Thomas, President, 
Local 109; Olive Pete Cain, Chairman of the Apprenticeship 
Committee, and Roy L. Moore, Recording Secretary of Local 
109. 



Carpenters Local Union 1280, Mt. View, Calif., paid 
tribute of 25-year members and Past Presidents at a 
recent meeting by awarding appropriate pins. 

The pins were presented by Brother Joe Cambiano, In- 
ternational Executive Board member representing the 
Eighth District and a 55 year member of our Brotherhood. 
Brother E. A. Roberts, 46 years of continuous member- 
ship, was the senior member of a group of 19 members 
having 25 or more years of continuous service. The 
senior member of the Past Presidents receiving pins was 
Brother N. H. Beck and he has 40 years of continuous 
membership in Local 1280. 

The evening was enhanced by an excellent buffet pre- 
pared by Ladies Auxiliary 554 much to the delight of the 
guests, members and their wives who attended the 
presentations. 

Past Presidents, guests and Officers are shown above 
shortly after completion of the presentations. Reading 
from left to right, top row: Brothers W. E. Dowell, 27 
years; F. O. Jorgenson, District Council Secretary; Joe 
Cambiano, International Executive Board Member; Leigh 
Keeline, President; L. E. Bee, Financial Secretary; Chris 
O'Toole, Recording Secretary and 27 years; Elmer Berg- 
lund, 25 years; Arnold LeBlanc, Past President; Harold 
Halfhill, 27 years; Nels Swanberg, 25 years; center row: 
D. L. Chesrown, 26 years; Frank Simmons, 27 years; 
Antonio Mirenda, 26 years; Carl Peterson, 34 years: Frank 
Robinson, 26 years; Carl Swanson, 26 years; Wayne Brad- 
ford, 40 years; C. H. Clayton. 31 years; Gustav Anger, 25 
years; bottom row: Duane Bridgman. Past President; N. 
H. Beck, Past President, 25 years; C. G. VanStraaten, 
Past President, 26 years; George E. Price, Past President 
and now Business Representative: Carl West, 26 years; E. 
A. Roberts, 46 years, and Robert McWhinnie, 42 years. 



Local 169 Floats Along in Parade 




Local 169, East St. Louis, III., joined in the city's recent 
celebration to mark the 100th anniversary of the city's in- 
corporation. Shown above is the float sponsored by Local 
169 and some of the Brothers on board for the ride. 



JULY, 1961 



31 



IN CONCLUSION 




H 




M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



Social Security Needs Some Changes 
"hree Recommendations 




The Social Security system is now a part of our lives.